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resignation

Discussion in 'Early Years' started by bossyhill, Jan 30, 2011.

  1. I am about to resign a position I have only just begun. I fell into the trap of a part-time job teaching, believing it to be exactly that; part-time. What I'm finding is that it requires a full-time commitment, and this year my focus needs to be on a course I am studying part-time. I have decided to hand in my notice tomorrow and am wondering whether there are circumstances when schools allow you to leave earlier then would be usual, particularly since I have been there such a short time. I utterly regret taking up the post, but somehow thought it might work out, instead I feel really stressed and unhappy and feel that the workload keeps building. Now I feel I cannot do neither my course nor the job well. I am sure that the school is unhappy with me too. It is meant to be a job for only two terms to cover someone's maternity leave, but it requires so much extra work as the school wants me to change the way things have been running and introduce things that have not been done before. The thought of being able to leave makes me feel like I can breathe again, so I'm making this difficult choice. Please respond, I haven't had anyone to talk to about this, so any replies would be welcomed.
    Thank you,
    Miss Hill
     
  2. I am about to resign a position I have only just begun. I fell into the trap of a part-time job teaching, believing it to be exactly that; part-time. What I'm finding is that it requires a full-time commitment, and this year my focus needs to be on a course I am studying part-time. I have decided to hand in my notice tomorrow and am wondering whether there are circumstances when schools allow you to leave earlier then would be usual, particularly since I have been there such a short time. I utterly regret taking up the post, but somehow thought it might work out, instead I feel really stressed and unhappy and feel that the workload keeps building. Now I feel I cannot do neither my course nor the job well. I am sure that the school is unhappy with me too. It is meant to be a job for only two terms to cover someone's maternity leave, but it requires so much extra work as the school wants me to change the way things have been running and introduce things that have not been done before. The thought of being able to leave makes me feel like I can breathe again, so I'm making this difficult choice. Please respond, I haven't had anyone to talk to about this, so any replies would be welcomed.
    Thank you,
    Miss Hill
     
  3. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    The school could release you early (without working notice) but it will depend on finding a replacement and at the head and governors discretion
     
  4. Yes, I am hoping for something like that, thank you.
     
  5. grumbleweed

    grumbleweed Established commenter

    hello misshill
    A lot will depend on your contract, and I would check on your period of notice, I recall it may be 4 weeks if on a temp contract, but I'm sure others will correct if m wrong.
    You may not even have a contract yet if you only just started?
    The head may release you early, if they can fill the post easily enough,I was released early once.

    Sorry to hear yu are finding it hrad going, have a chat with your head tomorrow.

     
  6. thank you and will do!
     
  7. In the meantime, perhaps you could point out that you are only a part-time teacher and that you are not able to fulfill expectations in the time for which you are employed. Ask your headteacher for non-contact time to do 'extras' or ask him or her politely when you are to do these extra things.
    If more teachers were firmer about this, then teachers would not get so put upon. I've often called for 'time-management' studies to show how the things we are expected to do are 'doable' within a reasonable time frame (and, of course, they rarely are doable). They do not seem to exist - and if they do, I've never heard of them nor seen them.
    Hopefully, as you are so disaffected and unhappy anyway, you'll be able to get tougher about not working silly hours for a part-time appointment.
     
  8. inky

    inky Lead commenter

    Is your job share partner being similarly put upon? Is an Ofsted pending?
    I'm part-time and do PPA cover with no non-contact time. I fought my battle and caused outrage on here because I refused to do planning.
     
  9. inky

    inky Lead commenter

    How is this affecting your job share partner?
    I had to fight a bit of a time battle recently since I'm now part-time and do PPA cover with no non-contact time. It caused a bit of a furore on here. However, my HT supported my case, which I presented with official documentation about roles, so it's worth having a go.
    Maybe you've bitten off more than you can chew, though. There's always going to be out-of-hours stuff and you need to concentrate on your course. What about supply? It'll tide you over and you won't have any responsibilities beyond marking. You can also skip a week when an assignment is due!
    Good luck.
     
  10. had definitely bitten off more than i could chew and my head saw that too, she said she respected my honesty in saying it was more than i could manage right now. i feel the school could have made it easier for me to take up the position, but i am just so happy to leave- just two weeks to go. the person i'm job sharing with is taking up the job full-time which is so much better for the children. so all's good, am not thinking about my future reference right now, will be happy to do supply for a while.
     

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