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Requests for interviews/inspections/observations etc ...

Discussion in 'Early Years' started by sadika, May 8, 2011.

  1. sadika

    sadika New commenter

    First of all let me say I am well aware of the pressure of these ... BUT why are there SO many requests from teachers, including NQTs who seem unable/unwilling to think for themselves? A recent thread was asking for suggestions for a story ... there's yet another about "Going on a bear hunt" ... it concerns me that if these trained professionals cannot work out basic things like this for the interview/inspection/observation WHAT do they expect to happen day in day out in their classrooms??? Would you trust them teaching a class of children??
     
  2. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    I believe sharing ideas is a good thing and that we can all learn from each other but it is sometimes worrying that posters don't seem to have a clue and even more worrying the way some postes react to suggestions.
     
  3. InkyP

    InkyP Star commenter

    I worry too that these people, either NQT's or new to the age group, seem so badly prepared or just lacking in self-confidence. Is the initial training lacking or are they bewildered by it all?
     
  4. sadika

    sadika New commenter

    I agree with sharing - and have contributed many hopefully helpful contributions in the past - and indeed received helpful advice too. What I am bothered about is requests for seemingly BASIC things. Every EY professional needs to have the ability to "think on their feet", adapt rapidly, have banks of ideas to turn to. The internet has provided us with a wonderful opportunity and there should be no excuse for a lack of knowledge and willingness to research and find out .... resources are plentiful - Google and it's there on a plate! Maybe there is TOO much reliance on this rather than a desire and confidence to sort it out for yourself?
     
  5. InkyP

    InkyP Star commenter

    I seem to remember finishing my 4 year BEd course in 1985 (pre-Google or TES online - no internet then) and being raring to go. I thought I knew it all - obviously I didn't know the half of it but at least I had some confidence.
    I think it's great to be able to share ideas and I'm always looking stuff up on the internet via Google, it's the lack of confidence in their own abilities that concerns me.
     
  6. I am wondering if it has something to do with the emphasis on planning in the later primary years. Students and new teachers then feel insecure when they may not be able to plan everything down to the last moment. But, in early years you really do have to think on your feet. More often than not, the plan is abandoned because of the way the children respond, and of necessity you have to go off at a tangent. It's great! Never a dull moment. But the ability to make the best of this takes longer to master than the ability to create a three part lesson plan.
     
  7. I completely agree with you, I find it incredible that there are SOOO many posts (especially this time of year) requesting ideas for interviews. One person the other day actually asked for ideas for a ten minute maths session - how do people actually survive in teaching if they have no simple ideas?? It so frustrating!! I have always asked advice of co workers once I've had made my decision about what I'm doing, but it just seems so crazy how many people can't even think of anything basic!! Do they not do this everyday anyway!!
     
  8. My recent experience of 2 NQTs is that no they can't think for themselves anymore, even though like previous posters have said type it in google and there will be 100s of ideas waiting on a plate for them! I also find it very worrying when you offer advice you get the response I would expect from a stropy teenage maybe it is just me!
     
  9. I suppose the people asking for ideas on here are just trying to maximise the chances of finding good ideas by using other professionals. They probably look on Google as well. The sad thing is that other people's ideas never work as well as your own, because you haven't thought them through enough. I would advise these people to present some of their own ideas on here and get feedback rather than expecting to be presented with a buffet of possibilities.
     
  10. Luckydip

    Luckydip New commenter

    I think thatif you are not willing or certainly have a bee in your bonnet about helping others, then you should de-register on this website!! At the end of the day even though I am an experienced teacher, I still like to ask other professionals for their help and ideas. I dont think there is anything wrong with that, after all I thought we were supposed to do this job for the children??? and if there is anyway we can make their learning fun, why should we feel like we can't ask others?I hope that whatever demons you are holding they are resolved. I will continue to ask and help other teachers!!!
     
  11. Luckydip

    Luckydip New commenter

    Many of the people probably do have lots of ideas themselves, but are looking for ways they can improve or add to them. I don't think they use the ideas entirely!!
     
  12. Middlemarch

    Middlemarch Star commenter

    A primary head who posts regularly on TES recently interviewed for a main scale post and 4 out of 6 candidates turned up and did the same lesson - that they'd all taken from a thread on TES like the ones here.
    Needless to say, all four were unsuccessful.

     
  13. Luckydip

    Luckydip New commenter

    Well then that is silly if they can't make it their own! ubt. I don't think that we should stop helping one another!
     
  14. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    I don't think anyone on this thread has suggested that people stop helping others or that sharing ideas is wrong.
     
  15. NellyFUF

    NellyFUF Senior commenter

    I don't remember parading my wares when I applied for jobs way back when. I talked about what I could do of course.............I remember all sorts of interviews and all sorts of questions.
    It may be that there is greater pressure on our young teachers.
    It may be that there is greater pressure on us!
    In the old days, singing songs and rhymes and reading stories with the odd game in a smaller group maybe, was the order of the day. Now you have to see learning happen during a carpet session. Add to the that the management of a new group of children in interview situation... I think it is a tall order.
     
  16. Middlemarch

    Middlemarch Star commenter

    It is - but given that the job is immensely hard, it seems to me that ensuring the successful candidate can actually do the job requires allowing all candidates an equal chance to show what they can do.
    Propping any one of them up by supplying lessons because they say they have 'no ideas' is doing the entire profession a disservice.
     
  17. sadika

    sadika New commenter

    Re: Propping any one of them up by supplying lessons because they say they have 'no ideas' is doing the entire profession a disservice.
    Yes - that's what worries me - the ones who admit to having "no ideas" - I don't mind helping anyone who is prepared to help themselves and wants to run ideas past others - and over the years I have done so.

     

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