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Remedial Reading Schemes

Discussion in 'English' started by wanderfar, Apr 18, 2012.

  1. wanderfar

    wanderfar New commenter

    I am currently looking into different reading schemes for those in Year 7 who have very low literacy. I would love to hear from people who have implemented schemes, which they have chosen and why, and how well they have worked. I have looked at Read Write Inc and heard of 'accelerated reading' or something like this that have been successful in a secondary setting.
     
  2. wanderfar

    wanderfar New commenter

    I am currently looking into different reading schemes for those in Year 7 who have very low literacy. I would love to hear from people who have implemented schemes, which they have chosen and why, and how well they have worked. I have looked at Read Write Inc and heard of 'accelerated reading' or something like this that have been successful in a secondary setting.
     
  3. We use the following:

    dandelion readers for those who need phonically decodable books

    rigby rapid (we bought ks2 version but they've now brought out one for ks3 which looks even more age appropriate)

    project x (though we use these for guided reading, they are also designed to be used for independent readers)

    dockside - these have a good look to them for older pupils

    I am happy with all of these and continue to use them all.

    We've had accelerated reading in the past - I wasn't at this school then - and though I know some think highly of it, it doesn't seem particularly engaging to me. The pupils sit on a computer and answer questions after they've read the text. Personally, I prefer to do this one to one, or in guided reading, so pupils can express themselves more fully and you can tailor the questions to different AFs. By the way, project x books come with teaching notes which include questions and activities for guided reading linked to AFs. Both Rigby and Project X have teachers' books too with further guidance.

    I looked at Read Write Inc but decided against it because it looked very workbook-oriented to me and I wasn't impressed by the look of these workbooks. i also prefer to plan more creatively than just follow a really structured scheme of work. However, I know many schools love it and have found it has raised levels. I just haven't spoken to anyone I know who uses it - I've only read articles about it.

    Sorry if this is really rambling but I hope it helps. Please ask if you'd like further info/clarification.
     
  4. Before investing in a new scheme, u might first like to establish exactly what their problems are.
    How good is their grasp of basic English phonics?
    U can check that by getting them to read some of the regularly spelt words from the 300 most used English words:

    <font size="3">a, about, across, again, air, along, am, an, and, around, as, at, away, baby, back, bad, because, bed, been, before, began, best, better, big, birds, boat, box, boy, but, by, came, can, car, cat, children, cried, dad, dark, day, did, didn&rsquo;t, different, dog, duck, eggs, end, even, feet, fell, first, fish, floppy, fly, for, found, fox, from, fun, garden, gave, get, girl, go, going, got, gran, grandad, green, had, hard, has, hat, help, her, here, him, his, home, horse, hot, house, I, I&rsquo;ve, if, in, inside, is, it, it&rsquo;s, its, jumped, just, keep, king, let, let&rsquo;s, like, liked, little, long, lots, made, make, man, may, miss, more, morning, mouse, much, mum, must, my, need, new, next, night, no, not, of, off, on, or, our, out, over, park, place, play, queen, rabbit, ran, red, right, round, run, sat, say, sea, see, shouted, sleep, so, still, stop, stopped, suddenly, sun, take, tea, tell, than, that, that&rsquo;s, their, them, then, these, they, thing, things, think, this, three, time, top, tree, trees, under, up, us, use, way, well, went, when, which, while, why, will, wind, window, wish, with, yes. </font>
    If they can read the above fluently, check how they cope with the trickier ones:
    From the 100 most HF ones:
    <font size="3">he, of, the, to, was,</font><font size="3">all, be, are, have, one, said, we, you, by, my, call, before, come, could, do, down, into, look, me, more, now, only, other, right, she, some, their, there, two, when, want, were, what, where, which, who, your.</font> [/b]
    Being able to read all the above without hesitation is essential for reading fluency. If they are fine with those, then they just need more practice and any text will do, as long it appeals to them.
    If u are not sure what causes English reading difficulties, look at
    http://englishspellingproblems.blogspot.com/2009/12/reading-problems.html


     
  5. Masha, you posted the same thing here in 2005 and everyone said you were a bloody nuisance then. You've learned nothing.
     
  6. Wrong. I did not even join tes list till 2006, and did not publish my first blog post til Dec 2009.
     
  7. 27 May, 2005
     

  8. https://community.tes.co.uk/forums/t/138606.aspx?PageIndex=1
     
  9. recliningbuddah

    recliningbuddah New commenter

    The new Heinneman Rapid Plus series is good and yuo can buy it online too!
     
  10. Oh and I've remembered that on another thread, some TES posters recommended the new Project X code books which are phonically decodable. They look good and we're looking into whether we can afford any more books.
     

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