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Remedial ingredients

Discussion in 'Cookery' started by 16 Heath, Jun 2, 2011.

  1. What has been your best remedy ingredient to date?
    Once new to cooking curries - had a very sheltered upbringing - decided to make a curry for a friends coming over for dinner. This was when I was young and turrning up with a bottle of **** wine made us feel "grown up".
    Despite my youthful confidence, chucked in too much chilli powder and realised had nothing but searing curry to serve for guests. With quick thinking, I grabbed the chutney my mum had made for me and added enough until the sweetness removed the heat. Friends still rave about the 'fruity' curry I made.
    This is probably the only cookery event in my life where I have come out smelling of roses. As a result, am too scared to cook anything new for guests.
    Anyone else got great "save the day ingredient" stories. Perhaps we can all learn from each other.


     
  2. What has been your best remedy ingredient to date?
    Once new to cooking curries - had a very sheltered upbringing - decided to make a curry for a friends coming over for dinner. This was when I was young and turrning up with a bottle of **** wine made us feel "grown up".
    Despite my youthful confidence, chucked in too much chilli powder and realised had nothing but searing curry to serve for guests. With quick thinking, I grabbed the chutney my mum had made for me and added enough until the sweetness removed the heat. Friends still rave about the 'fruity' curry I made.
    This is probably the only cookery event in my life where I have come out smelling of roses. As a result, am too scared to cook anything new for guests.
    Anyone else got great "save the day ingredient" stories. Perhaps we can all learn from each other.


     
  3. nick909

    nick909 Lead commenter

    Lemon or lime can be dish-savers for me.
    Most frequently, when a much needed kick of acidity is needed to lift a slightly sweet dish, or one lacking much freshness.
    To offset oiliness, with certain fish, for example.
    To bring out the flavours in some fruit, soft fruit particularly (blueberries, sugar and lime juice are a recent discovery, cooked gently as a compote to top porridge - lovely!)
    To balance the heat of chilli - lime is essential in many curries
    To give chargrilled meat a kick - lemon on barbecued chicken or lamb...mmmm...


     
  4. At leastonce a month, I end up throwing out lemons. I will know how to put them to good use next time. Never would have thought of any of these for myself. Cheers.
     
  5. I've read somewhere adding a couple of squares of good dark chocolate (or cocoa powder) can take the heat out of chilli. Not tried it though-would rather it it! [​IMG]
     
  6. Si N. Tiffick

    Si N. Tiffick Occasional commenter

    I always put a couple of squares of Maya Gold into my chilli- it doesn't take hte heat out but rather intensifies the flavour. Do try it!
     
  7. That's it. I am trying these suggestions - all of them - as I am so curious!
     
  8. egyptgirl

    egyptgirl Senior commenter

    100% agree. Chocolate and chilli is a classic combo and works amazingly well. Give it a go!
     
  9. You can freeze the juice as ice cubes - then just use as you need.
    Also, if you only need a squirt of lemon juice - stick a skewer into the lemon and just squeeze out as much juice as you need. Keep the lemon in a tupper box and you can still squeeze out juice the next time you need it (lasts a few days in the box).
    You can also slow dry slices of lemon or orange in the oven (stick a wooden spoon in the door to make sure you dry rather than cook) and use as cake decoration or in a pot pourri (I stick mine in one of those large windlight things - very nice in Winter) or even hang them in your wardrobe.
    Or - use the lemon for cleaning. Great for lime scale - either squeeze the juice and use it or cut a lemon in half and rub on the surface you want to clean. Tis GREAT for cleaning sinks (and is a natural disinfectant).
    You can also use lemon juice to clean guitars and strings but if you are not as obsessed as my family is with guitars, this may not be an option for you.
    Place slices of lemon (or wedges) in a saucer on a windowsill and it will deter insects such as midgies (think of those citronella candles you can buy - why pay for them?)
    You can also use lemon juice as a natural stain remover on clothes before washing. Also add some lemon juice to your white wash load - they come up nice and white.
    Use them to shine up metal - taps, sinks (as mentioned), pans, etc.
    Also great for getting grime off windows.
    Rub a wedge or half a lemon over your chopping board after washing - it acts as a disinfectant.
    Sprinkle onto fruit to stop discolouring when making a fruit salad.
    If you have grated cheese and are finding it difficult to clean - rub a wedge of lemon along the grooves.
    I feel like Mrs. Beeston or summat. I should write a book on a million and one uses for food which has nothing to do with cooking [​IMG]

     
  10. Off the topic, but I am glad. I love this post!
     
  11. You are very generous and kind.
    I just logged in and reread my post and thought "God, CQ, you do waffle on sometimes".

     

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