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Relief / substitute/supply teaching

Discussion in 'Behaviour' started by kabainbridge, Dec 13, 2011.

  1. Hello all, I am a relief teacher in New Zealand and also a beginning teacher. I would love some advice on dealing behaviour problems with primary school students from a relievers point of view.
    I have read all the great advice on your forums but I don't have the luxury of being able to try the reward charts, traffic lights and other strategies that take time to get to know your students.
    Often I dont know names so putting names on the board can be a challenge. I like the advice I saw on one forum about discussing expectations at the beginning of the day and rewarding them with 3 blocks of 10 minutes of game/free time.
    Some schools I teach there are students with anger management problems. Juniors are challenging at the best of times. They dont seem to be able to stand in line without pushing, hitting etc. They are constantly calling each other names or hitting. I feel like I am dealing with these issues all day. Obviously the regular teacher has no rewards in place or I'd be using it or if they do they don't tell me about it.
    Sending for anther teacher to remove them to another class has worked from time to time. I feel like a failure when I have to do this. Time out mats only work when the child will go there.
    I would like other relievers to please share what they do to set the tone, get around not knowing names, and being in control.
     
  2. Hello all, I am a relief teacher in New Zealand and also a beginning teacher. I would love some advice on dealing behaviour problems with primary school students from a relievers point of view.
    I have read all the great advice on your forums but I don't have the luxury of being able to try the reward charts, traffic lights and other strategies that take time to get to know your students.
    Often I dont know names so putting names on the board can be a challenge. I like the advice I saw on one forum about discussing expectations at the beginning of the day and rewarding them with 3 blocks of 10 minutes of game/free time.
    Some schools I teach there are students with anger management problems. Juniors are challenging at the best of times. They dont seem to be able to stand in line without pushing, hitting etc. They are constantly calling each other names or hitting. I feel like I am dealing with these issues all day. Obviously the regular teacher has no rewards in place or I'd be using it or if they do they don't tell me about it.
    Sending for anther teacher to remove them to another class has worked from time to time. I feel like a failure when I have to do this. Time out mats only work when the child will go there.
    I would like other relievers to please share what they do to set the tone, get around not knowing names, and being in control.
     
  3. PaulDG

    PaulDG Occasional commenter

    I don't know what the situation is like in New Zealand, but in England, if you can't name an offender (or, perhaps, name a child exhibiting model behaviour to praise and thank), you're stuffed!

    In England, if the kids don't think you know their names, they take it as both an indication that you don't care about them / respect them enough and believe they can get away with murder.

    So, as an absolute first thing, you must find out their names. If you're not supplied with a seating plan, then use the first few minutes to make your own. Or make them put name cards on their desks. Or both.

    You have no chance (at least in England) until you can name all of the trouble makers and at least 3 or 4 of the good kids. You can still get away without naming about 1/3rd of the class, but only just.
     
  4. Thanks Paul. I should take the time when I meet a new class. You are right. Any thoughts on the other questions in my posting about dealing with the trouble makers. Relief teaching is a challenge. I do lots of things to acknowledge the ones doing what I want- "I see Ella is ready....Well done to this table they are doing really great work I see (then spend time with them)." In the meantime there are those not doing anything or leaving the classroom even. I do spend time setting up the day with my expectations. Maybe I need to resign myself to the fact that these few who dont want to work (consistently for relievers) will spend the day in another class. Maybe I am putting too much pressure on myself to fix this. I just want to learn effective ways of dealing with these ones incase I have them in my own class one day.
     
  5. I work as a primary relief teacher in many schools after working with children with BESD (behaviour emotional social problems) Teaching day to day supply can be a challenge particularly when the children know you are only with them for the day. I go in "hard" from the first minute I meet them. I never shout or raise my voice but I am firm. The time to start is when they line up outside. Set your stall out about your expectations before you get into the classroom. Once in the classroom I make sure I have the upper hand. I am proactive and go in for a lot of "low level nagging" which I continue all day if necessary. eg make sure children are sitting properly at their desks. If there are any children showing off I tell them that I might have to keep tthem in at breaktime to have a chat and get to know them better. Understand the classroom dynamics and find out who the "leaders" are and concentrate on sorting them out. Afternoons are generally more problematic than mornings because there are fewer sanctions you can apply.
     

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