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Rehoming cats

Discussion in 'Personal' started by Crowbob, Apr 26, 2011.

  1. Crowbob

    Crowbob Established commenter

    Your problem isthe children, not the cats. Rehome the children.
     
  2. Phoenixchild

    Phoenixchild Occasional commenter

    The RSPCA rehomed them to you? Another reason I loathe the RSPCA.
    Contrary to popular belief cats CAN be trained, I know, I have 6 and have homed several others, including a pregnant female, trained her litter and rehomed them all.
    I have no useful suggestions for rehoming, again, those poor cats, why not try the Cats protection league this time though, I've always found them very helpful.
     
  3. Phoenixchild

    Phoenixchild Occasional commenter

    Have just realised how that sounded, I just mean that your circumstances were obviously not suitable for those cats.xx
     
  4. I wonder if they have had an experience with children/loud noises etc in the past that causes them to be stressed by your children. You can contact the RSPCA/Cats Protection but be aware you will be at the bottom of a long list in terms of their priorities and may have to wait a while before they will take them from you to rehome them.
    How old are your children? If they are very small it may be that once they are a little older and calmer, the cats will adjust. Small children will terrify most cats because they are loud and have no sense of boundaries with animals, but most cats can find places in the house that they feel safe away from the child. If the children are old enough to understand, teach them that the cat is not a toy and that it needs time on its own. If the cat has a favourite sleeping place, tell the children that when the cat is in this place it is not to be disturbed. The children need training just as much as the cats!
    The toilet issue can be horrid but cats can be trained out of it. Removing the carpet is a good idea because then any smell (which may make the cat think its the right place to go) is removed. Once it has their scent on it, they can become confused as it smells like a toilet to them.
    Have a few litter trays in various rooms. As soon as you see him/her squat to go to the toilet, pick them up and put them in the litter tray. Have lots of newspaper around the trays and if they go on the newspaper, dont worry, just put newspaper in the litter tray with no litter too. Gradually decrease the area with newspaper until it is just in the tray, then gradually start adding litter on top of the paper. Has the cat always had problems with going to the toilet on a tray, or has it started recently?
    If its recent its probably stress related - try a feliway difuser - you can get them from vets, they are harmless phereomones that destress cats.
    I hope that helps a little bit. It sounds very stressful but if you're anything like me giving up your cats would be a last resort, so id I were you id try everything I could first! Speak to your vet about it too - they will be understanding and should have further advice.
     
  5. ilovesooty

    ilovesooty Lead commenter

    Some great advice from impulce.

    If they go back to the RSPCA they won't be easy to rehome. I imagine they'll get 7 days' grace then be put to sleep.

    You took them on and they are your responsibility. They sound despereately unhappy and my heart goes out to them.
     
  6. If the cats were rehomed from the RSPCA several years ago, does that mean you've actually had them several years? Just wondering if the children arrived after the cats.
    The advice on litter training is good. For the food stealing, I doubt your cat really connects being put outside with that behaviour - the response needs to be immediate. A short, sharp noise usually works - I clap loudly at cats doing things they shouldn't, like jumping on tables or working surfaces. Sometimes I slap my hand on the table/surface as that can be more effective.
    They usually get the message, and the noise isn't loud enough to hurt!
     
  7. Some cats just have habits that are very hard to break too. One of my cats was a stray and a scavenger when we took her in, and even though she is fed regularly she still obsesses over food when we are eating...if you have bread on the side of your tray its a goner if you dont watch it! When we have guests over we shut her out, and again a loud noise can distract her momentarily, but ultimately she wont break the habit. Its a bit easier to get younger cats out of the habit before it sets in as they begin to assosciate the behaviour with the noise etc, but older cats set in their ways will struggle.
    Anything like putting them out, smacking them etc is pointless as they'll just assosciate it with you and not their previous behaviour. Water pistols are another one for food stealing/scratching sofas as they dont then assosciate the water with you and become frightened of you - but it relies on having a sharp-reflexed person to help!

     
  8. You got there before me.
    Having a water spray bottle or pistol always ready on the bench beside the stove will help with this one.
    I do think the anti-stress air "freshener" could be a worthwhile strategy.
     
  9. What impulse said
    plus
    How does the cat get near the pan? I don't let cats onto work surfaces, if they are in the kitchen they are on the floor. If I have one that does not like those rules then the kitchen door is kept closed (I foster for Cats Protection so have had a lot of cats, some for a couple of days, some for years). Although I have a hallway wide enough for bowls of catfood and water.
    I agreee the cat probably thinks it should use the children's bedroom becaus of the smell, again - can't you close the door?

    Oh and biological washing powder is the best thing to get rid of cat urine/poo smell, other things will clean the smell to human noses but not cats.

    Feliway is good for destressing cats, it does work.

    Have they got access to a liter tray? Most cats know how to use them, if your cat doesn't then try different litter - some only like one particular texture.
    Was Cat no 1 hand reared? Sometimes if they are because the person rearing them cleans their bum on a soft towel they can get the idea that soft things are for toileting - if so you may need to add something soft tot he litter tray - incontinence pads are perfect - soft and will absorbe urine and won't break do to the weight of the othr stuff.
    Can you giveCat no 2 space he/she can get away from the children? It can be as simple as a bookshelf or cupboard that has space for No2 to get away and observe the children safely.
    Finally Cats Protection do run helplines, there will be oine in your local area - you can ask for a cat behaviour person to call you back.
    If after all that you still need to rehome them then

    1) check your agreement with the RSPVA - you may have to return them to them
    2) contact Cat's protection - as long as they are healthy they will not be put down, and of course a donation would be welcome



     
  10. lurk_much

    lurk_much Occasional commenter

    it made me laugh.

     
  11. I didn't find it particularly funny.
    Reading the thread, it was as if the animals were frankly disposables.
    Try harder ducky!
     
  12. DaisysLot

    DaisysLot Senior commenter

    ONe of my cats went through a stage of weeing in a bedroom.... We shut the door and contained him for a while to certain rooms in the house with hard floors until he quit. Your cat may have a urine infection or some such that needs treatment... there is always a reason for such behavior if it is a sudden change.
     
  13. I left this thread as I was very upset at having to think about rehoming my beloved cats and some of the comments made me feel a great deal worse.
    To clarify, the cats were given a home by us prior to having children. Both children are very good but one cat is clearly petrified of them and bolts for cover constantly and has broken things in his haste to get away. I could cope with that however, the problem is it breaks my heart to see him miserable living with us.
    The other cat is far more of a problem and he is the culprit with soiling carpets. I am humiliated at admitting this but my house smells dreadful because he persists in soiling in the bedrooms. We can close the door but the girls are in and out and it has to be open at night, anyway.
    I don't know what to do and would welcome any advice but please don't tell me what a heartless cow I am abdicating my responsibility, as that isn't true at all and is completely unfair.
     
  14. I replied with genuine advice, but you seem to have ignored it.
     
  15. Phoenixchild

    Phoenixchild Occasional commenter

    Then please give us the relevant information up front instead of adding it later and we can maybe be a bit fairer in our responses. That said Impulce did......!
    And just how long did you have your cats before you had children? I only ask because I have found the most timid cat to adapt, yes they set their own boundaries and like to bolt on ocassion but if you give them space to do that I find they come back calmer once the "perceived" threat has passed.
    As for the soiling, I can't get my head round that one at all so will bow to other posters experience.xx
     
  16. Phoenixchild

    Phoenixchild Occasional commenter

    Wine head mixed up necessary and occasion in one collar two sleeves, that makes sense to me. Basically apologies for incorrect and truly awful spelling of the latter.xx
    [​IMG]
     
  17. It wasn't a question of ignoring it, I should have thanked you, though, but some harsher comments came afterwards.
    I'm not really sure what information should have been included, phoenixchild? I said that the cats were scared of the children and that one in particular seemed to have issues with using their bedroom as a toilet. I'm sure you can appreciate I can't have a litter tray in a bedroom with a young child and a toddler. In fact the only 'new' information I have included is that we got the cats before children, which isn't all that surprising really.
    But I am sorry if I was misleading in my original post.
     
  18. I have re read my original post and I really don't see what information I should have included.
    You clearly love cats Phoenixchild which is obviously very much to your credit, I am a cat lover myself which is why I opened my post by saying I feel awful about this and considering rehoming the cats is as much for their good as for ours.
    I don't want my cats, or any animals, living in a home where they are clearly frightened, stressed and unhappy, and nor do I want to live in a house that smells like the inside of a drain, where I am repeatedly woken up at 3 in the morning by a cat scratching on a carpet as he prepares to empty his bowels in the corner of a room two young children share (we have a cat flap so he can go in and out as he pleases.) I am also paranoid that the smell of the room (and it does smell absolutely awful) makes the girls' clothes and hair smell as well.
    There is a litter tray in the hall that the frightened cat does use, or he goes outside, but the other cat seems to see the girls' bedroom as one giant litter tray, I'm sorry but I can't help but question if the people who seem to think I am abdicating my responsibility and seeing the animals as disposables would be quite so understanding if it was their carpets being ruined, if they'd had to replace a Moses basket twice when their child was a baby because the cat did his business in it, if their toddler came running through to the kitchen with cat poo all over her feet, as you can tell this has been going on for some time and I am frankly sick of it and am looking at other options and yes rehoming is the best option I think.
     
  19. ilovesooty

    ilovesooty Lead commenter

    That situation remains. Sorry.
     
  20. Would you care to draw my attention to the part where I said otherwise?
     

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