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Refusing

Discussion in 'Behaviour' started by seska, Jan 4, 2011.

  1. What am I supposed to do when a pupil refuses to follow any and all instructions? Sit in the correct seat. Stop talking. Do some work. The usual normal tasks... I've sent him to our school's naughty room a million times. He doesn't care. His family apparently don't care. He's a pain elsewhere in the school, but I'm constantly under pressure to keep him in the classroom, even though his behaviour clearly falls within the "send to the naughty room" criteria. He drives me batty and takes all my time because he's majorly disruptive.
     
  2. What am I supposed to do when a pupil refuses to follow any and all instructions? Sit in the correct seat. Stop talking. Do some work. The usual normal tasks... I've sent him to our school's naughty room a million times. He doesn't care. His family apparently don't care. He's a pain elsewhere in the school, but I'm constantly under pressure to keep him in the classroom, even though his behaviour clearly falls within the "send to the naughty room" criteria. He drives me batty and takes all my time because he's majorly disruptive.
     
  3. keep sending him out. Again and again and again and see (ask around) what other teachers do -if they do the same, someone might get the message.
    For you to have to focus such a lot of your attention on that one unruly pupil is unfair to all the others who deserve a LESSON.
     
  4. RaymondSoltysek

    RaymondSoltysek New commenter

    It's absolutely right to keep sending him out: if he deserves it, he goes. Always remember that.
    However, try focusing on his behaviour as part of the class. Deal with one aspect at a time - let;s say, coming in and sitting in correct seats. Set that as the target for the month and offer a class wide reward. Then, remember to give specific feedback . Something like this:

    "Okay class, I'm a little concerned about how we enter the room and the seats we sit in. So - jackets off, books out, into correct seats for the whole period. If everyone does that right, you'll earn one point on the board towards a word / number / general knowledge quiz at the end of the week, with prizes."
    Practice it with them. Then
    "Well done, Joe, you've got your jacket off. Karen, you have you're book out, thank you. Darren (and it's always a Darren), you're not sitting in the correct seat, so I'm afraid the class doesn't earn it's point. However, if you move to your correct seat now and stay there for the period and go to the correct seat tomorrow, the class might earn their point for today's period."
    Try not to concentrate on Darren all the time: occasionally say, "Joe, you haven't got your jacket off, but if you take it off now and I don't have to remind you tomorrow, the class might get their point back."
    It'll take time to retrain him in all the behaviours you want from him, and in the meantime you continue to play the discipline system. However, obviously sending him to the naughty room isn't working, so you have to try other ways to skin this particular cat. Peer pressure can work pretty well!
     
  5. RaymondSoltysek

    RaymondSoltysek New commenter

    I should have added - a class wide reward scheme like this has the added benefit of allowing you to recognise the pupils who ARE behaving, thereby emphasising your expectations in a positive way that says thank you to them for that. They deserve that boost too!
     
  6. It's important to keep a log of his behaviours with specifics. This helps if his case should go any further, E.g temporary exclusion.
     
  7. Agreed.
    I'm not entirely against the idea of using peer pressure as a means of getting children to work harder but I disagree with using it in this instance.
    The boy in the OP is behaving in an appalling manner on a consistant basis and the rest of his class already have to put up with his continual disruption. I find it morally repugnant that your proposed solution effectively involves punishing the classmates for a situation that is beyond their control and certainly not their responsibility to sort out.

     
  8. Random175

    Random175 New commenter

    Isn't it? I am also a mother of teenage children it takes alot more than a few times to get them into good habits and keep them there. Personally I don't like using peer pressure as I think it can get out of hand too easily and you end up with a tell telling, point scoring culture in the class room. Ultimately he will get bored being sent out. You just need to have the conviction that you are doing the right thing for him, for the other children and for your own sanity. I think most behaviour matters to do with teenagers are a matter of attrition and every one knows teaching secondary is a marathon and not a sprint.
     

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