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Reduced state school pay

Discussion in 'Pay and conditions' started by samantha2013, Jul 8, 2012.

  1. In these rough economic times, state school pay should be reduced since it is not fair to place the burden on the taxpayer. We are all in this together.
    A disproportionate number of students who enter the best universities and most productive jobs come from private schools, so our private school pay should be increased at 2x the pace of inflation.
     
  2. In these rough economic times, state school pay should be reduced since it is not fair to place the burden on the taxpayer. We are all in this together.
    A disproportionate number of students who enter the best universities and most productive jobs come from private schools, so our private school pay should be increased at 2x the pace of inflation.
     
  3. emilystrange

    emilystrange Star commenter

    someone get rid of this ***, please?
     
  4. The taxpayer does not support us, but we do support the state schools. Gove is right to bring in regional pay deals for state schools, our economy is on its knees. We need to reduce the size of the state.
     
  5. emilystrange

    emilystrange Star commenter

    who are you, gove? go away. we take enough **** as it is from the govt and media, without your mindless spouting of tory claptrap. we actually need to reduce the number of public school educated clique members in government. at the moment, i see none of them suffering from the economy being on its knees - and they're the ones who caused it/allowed it to happen/aren't doing anything much about it now.
     
  6. jubilee

    jubilee Star commenter

    You'll be calling for nurses in the NHS to have pay cuts next, with nurses in private hospitals getting pay increases!
     
  7. Compassman

    Compassman Star commenter

    You are Michael Gove or Michael Wilshaw and I claim my £10! However, if you are not then how low do you think teachers pay should be?
     
  8. emilystrange

    emilystrange Star commenter

    i don't think the silly girl realises that in a market economy, she's going to find it hard to get another job with all the extra applicants. the one she's got may well fall foul of budgets and cheaper labour.
     
  9. There should be a flat rate for all state school teachers. I think that £25,000 is a fair maximum salary (new recruits should start on less, say £18,000, with a 10 point scale to get to £25,000). Allowances should be capped at £5000 i.e. maximum pay to be £30,000 in London, but lower caps elsewhere, where teachers don't need to earn so much to survive.
     
  10. In my well known private school, we have a reputation for paying well. We also only recruit the very best from Oxford, so state school teachers would generally not be well qualified enough.
     
  11. Oh this did cheer me up on a wet Monday morning!
    "We only recruit the very best from Oxford."
    The very best from Oxford don't teach in private schools. They run the country.
    Something suspicious here, methinks.
     
  12. Morninglover

    Morninglover Star commenter

    Try living on that in - say - Tunbridge Wells, Walton-on-Thames or many other parts of the country where living costs are nearly as high as London. You'd find recruitment impossible...
     
  13. Morninglover

    Morninglover Star commenter

    Why Oxford...not really the top these days I'm afraid.

    BTW if your school recrutis so well at the moment, as a private company they need to pay less until they can't fill vacancie: that's how capitalism works!
     
  14. If our present cabinet (or the OP) really represent the best from private schools and Oxford, then I don't think much to the education on offer there, certainly not the teaching of critical thinking skills, or economics.
     
  15. DaisysLot

    DaisysLot Senior commenter

    Dear Sam,
    If you are one of those 'very best from Oxford' then I do need to inform you that you do unfortunately come across as, well, to be blunt, quite thick. I would advise keeping a low profile so that your well known private school doesn't have to become red faced at your complete inability to think beyond the end of your own snotty and pointed nose.
    Also that Cambridge topped the league tables internationally as the leading university once again (You sound like the kind of person who likes a league table)

    Happy Monday - Daisy - M.A CANTAB - From a 'comp', working in a 'comp' and proud.
    P.S Let's hope Oxford university press are now recruiting brighter folk from beyond the uni in order to avoid being fined 1.9 million next year eh?
     
  16. keyboard2

    keyboard2 Established commenter

    Arbitrary twaddle. What evidence do you have to support your suggestions?
    Why should a teacher in Newcastle be paid less than a teacher in Devon? They do the same job, don't they? Is it the teacher's fault that Newcastle has inadeqaute provision for private sector pay and employment?
    Anyway, where do you think the state employees spend their wages - in the private sector.
    I notice you do not mention regional pay for MPs doctors. Why? The same principle applies.
     
  17. I notice it states recruits only the very best from Oxford. No mention of the University. Maybe she means the very best from Oxford Job Centre, or the very best from a postcard in the window of one of the newsagents in Oxford. [​IMG]
     
  18. Middlemarch

    Middlemarch Star commenter

    I smell troll...
     
  19. jubilee

    jubilee Star commenter

    Reminds me of Jeffrey Archer who created the impression that he was an Oxford graduate when he'd followed some courses at an Oxford College (not an Oxford University College).
     
  20. jubilee

    jubilee Star commenter

    Are you all qualified enough to deal with multiple Special needs in a mainstream classroom and increasing numbers of pupils with behavioural issues?
    Do you teach for 190 days per year in 38 school weeks?
    Does your school get fined £3k for each pupil that it decides it can no longer cope with, leading to the school deciding that the teachers (and other pupils) have to put up with said pupil after all?
     

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