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Reclaiming PPI?

Discussion in 'Personal' started by Zebrahead, Feb 24, 2012.

  1. There is so much on the TV and radio about this at the moment, Ive looked at Martin Lewis website and downloaded the forms, but Im not sure if Ive paid it in the first place!
    Ive had credit cards since 2006, took out a loan in 2009, possibly had one earlier cant really recall. Also I have a mortgage that is just on basic rate as in not fixed at the moment.
    How can I find out if ive paid PPI?
    Thanks
     
  2. If you look on any statements you have, it should say 'Payment Protection', or something similar, in the list of payments.
     
  3. Anonymous

    Anonymous New commenter

    If you've paid it it will be mentioned on your statements.
    Coincidentally I have just received an offer from the first of the half a dozen claims I put in about 2 weeks ago. I foolishly said yes every time it was offered on a card or loan as it was implied that it would be wise to have it. However, teacher terms and conditions (6 months full pay, 6 months half pay for illness) and a local agreement guaranteeing no redundancies meant that I was unlikely ever to need it or qualify for a pay out.
    I'm still hyperventilating over what they're about to pay me back. Genuinely...I'm in shock. ...and that's just the first card.
    If you've paid it claim it back!!!!
     
  4. Reclaim it if you've paid it! It is easily worth the time and effort spent filling out the paperwork. They repay the actual amount you have paid plus interest. Often it was sold as income protection, payment protection, insurance or something like that. Usually the lender would imply that you really should have it and that you would be far more likely to gain approval for the loan (or whatever) if you agreed to take it.
    It can be worth thousands of pounds to you just for the sake of filling out some papers and the cost of a stamp - do it now!
     
  5. Crowbob

    Crowbob Established commenter

    How much? [​IMG]
     
  6. Anonymous

    Anonymous New commenter

    Enough to hyperventilate over! Dinx can confirm that.
    ...and me with a dodgy heart too!!!
     
  7. kibosh

    kibosh Star commenter

    I've hit a stumbling block in my claim. Received a horrible letter the other day from the bank I had my credit card with . . . . thinly veiled threats and a point blank refusal to provide me with the Credit Agreement I asked for, though they have cashed the cheque for £1 I had sent them.
    Not sure what to do next. But I'm not giving up on this.
    Years ago I tried to stop paying the Payment Protection and the bank wouldn't let me. I eventually got so sick of them I transferred my balance to another card and simply paid off the debt within 6 months.
     
  8. Anonymous

    Anonymous New commenter

    At the end of the letter I received this morning MBNA informs me that if I'm not happy I can contact the Financial Ombudsman:
    Financial Ombudsman Service
    Customer Contact Division
    South Quay Plaza
    183 Marsh Wall
    LONDON
    E14 9SR
    and their phone number is:
    0300 123 9 123
    Their service is free.

    oh...and if you're making a claim there is no need to use one of the many companies making a fortune out of this. One of my colleagues is pursuing a claim with a company which is charging her 30% of whatever she is offered. By using the forms on the banks own sites you pay nothing.


    I suggest you contact them. If it's any help you could PM me your email address and I'll scan the Ombudsman leaflets that were enclosed.

     
  9. kibosh

    kibosh Star commenter

    Interesting, same bank as me. [​IMG] The letter I received (from them) was not nearly as helpful.
    Thanks for the Ombudsman details. I'm going to take a closer look at Martin Lewis's website. If I hit a block, I will PM you, Seren, thanks for the offer.
    I wouldn't dream of it. Scammers the lot of them.
     
  10. Crowbob

    Crowbob Established commenter

    No fun! I want figures [​IMG] (for no reason other than nosiness)
     
  11. kibosh

    kibosh Star commenter

    Yeah, my nose is bothering me too. [​IMG] I'm glad someone is getting joy with all this malarky, makes me hopeful that one day I might be the one hyperventilating . . . I think I might salivate or drool though.
     
  12. Anonymous

    Anonymous New commenter

    Sorry for being mysterious!
    Perhaps knowing the grounds which I used to complain that the PPI was mis-sold might help? I stated that I never asked for PPI but when it was offered to me it was suggested that I would be wise to take it out in case I was ever ill or lost my job. They were aware I am a teacher and that, as such, my terms and conditions of employment meant that I'd be paid, in full, for illness for 6 months and half pay for a further six months - this meant it was unlikely that I'd need to claim PPI and that I was unlikely to qualify for it if I was off. Where I work we also had a 'no redundancy' clause in our council contract so, unless I was sacked (also unlikely) I was unlikely to lose my job. Are those grounds any use to you?
    On that basis MBNA haven't even entered into a dialogue - they are paying out the full amount of PPI I paid in, along with very substantial interest (on the amount and as compensation). The final figure is not to be sneezed at.
     
  13. Indeed and I can also add that the Financial Services Ombudsman is very helpful. Be aware that the process is not brief - it may take quite a few months for them to process your claim but the FSO people were very good in putting the boot up mine. Just keep on their case. I discovered that, for less than the amount I was paying on mine every month, I could have covered all my outgoings through my bank...I did not do that either but it's worth a thought.
     
  14. Anonymous

    Anonymous New commenter

    I lookback at the loans and cards I have had an curse myself for not getting PPI as I had a good job with sick pay and did not need it.
    Still - techinically I saved money by not getting it.
    Whilst I'm at it, I also look back and wish I'd put money in to building societies which converted to banks. Missed out on that. And bought a house in 1993 when they were cheap.
    Maybe I need a whiplash claim so I can finally use one of those companies who advertise on daytime TV.
     
  15. kibosh

    kibosh Star commenter

    They will be when I get to that stage. At present my first letter requesting my credit agreement has been snubbed with a point blank refusal to provide. My second letter, posted today, is requesting under the freedon of info act that all the charges or statements for my account be provided and sent to me. I've only kept a handful of statements, as I closed the account years ago.
    If they refuse to oblige me with my account charge details, I will contact the Ombudsman.
    I was self employed when I was forced to take out PPI and queried it twice during the autumn of 2006. It's probably going to be a long, slow haul, but hey ho, if I get there eventually I'll be chuffed.
     
  16. Halifax - told them it was implied I should definately take it. Phoned them - they have dedicated team 1 month ago. Got a letter yesterday - paying it and its done. From 2 little phone calls. Good luck everyone
     
  17. For those wanting figures... my husband was self-employed when he got loans/credit cards and so the PPI was definitely mis-sold. He is looking at getting nearly £10,000.

    Sometimes I wish I hadn't been so careful with money!
     
  18. Anonymous

    Anonymous New commenter

    There's a certain irony in the fact that the more bad you were at managing your money the more you're likely to get back. I was very bad indeed, staggering from one financial crisis to another.
     
  19. I had one of those poxy companies hounding me so I eventually gave in and let the man come round to discuss it with me. I was told they'd take 30% of the total claim and the meeting would take 30 minutes.

    He was here two hours and I was then told I'd have to pay £120 up front. I was fuming and told him that this was not what I'd been led to believe on the phone. It didn't sit right but I felt hounded into signing. There was a 14 day cooling off period so I called him the next day and told him I'd slept on it and didn't want to go ahead (by the way I hadn't paid the £120 as he did it for 35% instead of 30% and no up front fees). I asked him to bring all my paperwork (and therefore personal details) back to me and he said he would. Two days later he called me to say his boss told him he had to send it to head office so he had done that instead. I have subsequently put in a complaint to the company and have e mailed them to cancel the entire process.

    I know I could earn money back but I only had one possible claim and for the amount they were going to take before giving me my share it just doesn't seem worth the hassle.

    I'm also very annoyed I am not entitled to my personal details back and have a feeling they are going to try and run the claim anyway. If they do, I shall go mad.
     
  20. Anonymous

    Anonymous New commenter

    disguise - I urge you to contact the Financial Ombudsman. I posted the contact details earlier. Do it tomorrow!!!
     

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