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Recent Pension Increase.......Can't be the only one fuming about this?!

Discussion in 'Pay and conditions' started by ogara66, May 2, 2012.

  1. A lot less in my pay packet this month and hence during a time of pay freeze I and all in my profession have been given an effective pay cut!
    When I rang my local representative for the NASUWT, he told me that there was nothing I could do about this pension increase as the government had instituted laws to enforce it and apparently no teacher even has the right to opt out of this increase.
    In addition, he said that I was the only teacher who had rang him to discuss this matter and hence it would appear (although it is still early days yet!) that many in the teaching profession are prepared to roll over and allow these insidious increases.
    If the teaching profession as a whole does allow this, be prepared, as think tanks have informed the govenment that with regard to public sector pensions they have not gone nearly far enough.
    By rolling over and fully accepting this increase today, teachers will be voting for numerous more cuts to their pensions over the decades to come! Both the government and the Unions are closely watching to see what the response of the teaching profession will be.
    If teachers do nothing, key talent will also drain from the profession as surely as night follows day. Those of us who propose that teachers have the moral duty to teach in all circumstances hopefully are aware of this.
    I am hoping the NASUWT at national level will have foresight enough to anticipate the government's (and future governments) potential to erode pensions even more in the decades to come. Having spoken to them at the local level, I am starting to have doubts about their ability to anticipate and react effectively on our behalf, but they still have time to show the opposite and to be fair they have done fairly well up to now in many respects. (Although, their Action Short Of Strike Action appears to be very ineffective)
    I for one am hoping that both teachers and our unions will come up with a response in the near future that displays much more intelligence and some "lateral" solutions to the messy situation the current government have created.
     
  2. A lot less in my pay packet this month and hence during a time of pay freeze I and all in my profession have been given an effective pay cut!
    When I rang my local representative for the NASUWT, he told me that there was nothing I could do about this pension increase as the government had instituted laws to enforce it and apparently no teacher even has the right to opt out of this increase.
    In addition, he said that I was the only teacher who had rang him to discuss this matter and hence it would appear (although it is still early days yet!) that many in the teaching profession are prepared to roll over and allow these insidious increases.
    If the teaching profession as a whole does allow this, be prepared, as think tanks have informed the govenment that with regard to public sector pensions they have not gone nearly far enough.
    By rolling over and fully accepting this increase today, teachers will be voting for numerous more cuts to their pensions over the decades to come! Both the government and the Unions are closely watching to see what the response of the teaching profession will be.
    If teachers do nothing, key talent will also drain from the profession as surely as night follows day. Those of us who propose that teachers have the moral duty to teach in all circumstances hopefully are aware of this.
    I am hoping the NASUWT at national level will have foresight enough to anticipate the government's (and future governments) potential to erode pensions even more in the decades to come. Having spoken to them at the local level, I am starting to have doubts about their ability to anticipate and react effectively on our behalf, but they still have time to show the opposite and to be fair they have done fairly well up to now in many respects. (Although, their Action Short Of Strike Action appears to be very ineffective)
    I for one am hoping that both teachers and our unions will come up with a response in the near future that displays much more intelligence and some "lateral" solutions to the messy situation the current government have created.
     
  3. So, just what sort of action do you think the profession is prepared to take in an attempt to stop pension increases?
     
  4. Action should be radical but over the years the unions have allowed us to be stitched up by too much legal redtape. Personally, I would be for lessons once or twice a week with minimal educational content but I believe this would be a legal minefield.
    Thankfully, if neither of the large unions decide to do anything, I don't have to pay my union subscriptions.
    Both large unions are eyeing each other at the moment up to see who blinks first...... and neither of them seem to believe that teachers have the stomach to put up any fight.
    The NASUWT's 'Action Short of Strike Action' appears to be simply a type of "media propanganda" to make teachers believe they are doing more for them than the NUT.
     
  5. docendo discimus

    docendo discimus New commenter

    Roll over and not do anything?! I seem to remember NASUWT balloting for strike action over pay and conditions and going on strike over it recently. I went on strike, I lost a days pay. Most members didn't even bother to return their ballot papers. When the strike was called, most members in my school went against the strike and didn't bother to walk out. Now they are all moaning about their pay cuts - hypocrites!
     
  6. DaisysLot

    DaisysLot Senior commenter

    Yep! Agree with above.
     
  7. emilystrange

    emilystrange Star commenter

    i WAS thinking that perhaps the strikes were forgotten?
     
  8. lardylegs

    lardylegs Occasional commenter

    Absolutely. Everyone had a chance to show their feelings when the strike was on. But oh, no, they couldn't leave the kiddies for a single day. And now - shockaroony - less money in your pay packet, who'd have thunk it?
     
  9. coppull

    coppull New commenter

    We assume all of your colleagues ,who did not go on strke,will now not be giving good will,free time and working to contract in school. It will not cost them any money. If they cannot do these things ,no reason to moan about pension increase last month and pension increase in 2013 and 2014.Pay freeze in September 2012 and vitrual pay freeze in Septmember 2013 and 2014.
     
  10. Crowbob

    Crowbob Established commenter

    A lot of bluster that does not answer this question: "So, just what sort of action do you think the profession is prepared to take in an attempt to stop pension increases?"
     
  11. coppull - work to rule etc withdraw goodwill; how exactly will that send a message to HM Treasury?
    Schools are not the decision makers here, so I think it is wrong to take such action. Equally there is no stomach amongst the profession for further strike action.
    It seems this is a battle we have already lost. Face it, were we negotiating from a position of incredible weakness to start with.
     
  12. jubilee

    jubilee Star commenter

    It will eventually send a message to government if enough teachers work ro rule, as is their right.
    It will show up just how much is provided by teachers in terms of time and their own money, extras that teachers should no longer be prepared to offer when they are effectively suffering a pay cut for 3 yeras in a row, as well as losing more money to increased pension costs for inferior pension cover.
    The alternative is to carry on giving free services (lunch time clubs, after-school clubs, school trips ouuside school time etc) which is nonsensical when the teacher resents their ever decreasing pay in real terms.
    If school ask why you are withdrawing certain services, make it clear that you need your extra time after school to manage economies in your own budget (shopping around for deals etc) or for looking for p/t work some evenings/weekends to make up for your depleting salary power.
     
  13. Join a different Union. It seems that due to the close ties between PCS and UCU, that UCU are the only teaching Union striking this Thursday?
    All the main secondary school Unions decided it was too close to exams. Now I hear rumblings of colleagues who are annoyed with the timing... two weeks before AS exams, AFTER the delivery of the syllabus... I fail to see any impact here on students attainment. There are before and after college revision sessions on each and every topic in our syllabus. I feel no guilt personally.
    If someone could suggest a way, other than industrial action, to get our point across I'm all for it. The concessions that were achieved, and therefore the REDUCED DEDUCTION we all experienced in our pay packets this month was as A DIRECT RESULT OF the strikes last year.
    It NEEDS to continue or the momentum will be lost.
     
  14. lardylegs

    lardylegs Occasional commenter

    I'm sad to say I fear it is a lost cause. The constant HT cry (which they have clearly been primed to emit) of " What have you got to moan about? You're lucky to have a job at all! Do you know how many teachers have lost their jobs because of budget cuts? Do you realise how tight our budget is?"
     

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