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Real life problems

Discussion in 'Early Years' started by 1Elmer, Nov 8, 2011.

  1. I have an observation next week in numeracy with reception and it has to be made relevant to children's real life experiences. We are focussing on addition and our topic is space. How can I relate it to topic and real life situations? Has anyone got any ideas? Thank you.
     
  2. Anyone?
     
  3. Maybe they could imagine a visit from an alien and teach him how to go shopping with money?
     
  4. cariad2

    cariad2 New commenter

    How about an alien who likes eating 2 different - strange and unusual - thing. Eg worms and flowers. Have a large laminated picture of an alien, 6 small pictures of (for example) worms, and 6 small pictures of (for example) flowers.
    Have a large dice. Choose a child to roll the dice. Whatever number it lands on, put that many pictures of worms next to the picture of the alien. Have a 2nd child roll the dice. Whatever number it lands on, put that many pictures of flowers on the other side of the picture of the alien.
    How many things does the alien have to eat altogether? Children count all the pictures to find out.
    Not exactly related to real life, but I don't know how you could make space related to children's real life experiences.
     
  5. mystery10

    mystery10 Occasional commenter

    No I don't see how you can either. Are you absolutely required to make everything relate to everything else? It could become very time consuming for you dredging up the far-fetched ideas and prevent you moving on with what you need to move on this.
    Well there's more hope for subtraction at least, you can count downwards while you do the blast off, put some dynamite under the carpet, and off they all go.
     

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