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Reading

Discussion in 'Early Years' started by lizdot, Mar 9, 2019.

  1. lizdot

    lizdot New commenter

    Hi
    I have until recently tried to ensure that I hear every child read the same number of times, but now I or my TA are doing extra reads with some who are not progressing as quickly as the others. One such child is rarely read with at home, she refuses to with her parents. My TA is questioning the amount of extra time we are giving her. She feels it could be better spent with children who, in spite of support at home, are still falling behind.
    Just wondering about your thoughts on this and whether you prioritise some children for extra reads.
     
  2. caterpillartobutterfly

    caterpillartobutterfly Star commenter

    Being nursery, I don't hear children read. But I definitely prioritise for 'extra' anyone who isn't progressing as much as expected for whatever it is. Not generally 'extra' of the same thing, but something similar so teaching the same skill in a different way.

    For children without support at home, extra in school could well be all they need to catch up. However those who aren't progressing, despite all the support from home, probably won't catch up with just some extra reads at school. So, I'd actually say the total opposite to your TA...doesn't mean I'm right and she's wrong though.
     
    Lara mfl 05 likes this.
  3. grumbleweed

    grumbleweed Lead commenter

    I'd be inclined to look at what the child is finding difficult. If it's blending, play some phonics games, for example.
    If children don't have support at home, bare in mind that being read to is just as important as reading, so you could so some small group additional stories, perhaps repeating their favourites. Sometimes I think we forget that children still need to be read to....a lot!
    For children getting support at home but still falling behind, I'd try to find out why. What is it they are struggling withwith can it be built in to day to day things? Sometimes just 'more reading' is not the solution as more of one thing always means less of something else. You need to look at what matters most for the child.
     
  4. Lara mfl 05

    Lara mfl 05 Star commenter

    Very true. I'm old enough to remember the days when mos Primary classes had a story read to them at the end of the day, sigh.
    Being read to, singing /saying nursery rhymes etc. are all so important and sadly something which seems to have been squeezed out of home and school life these days. :(

    I'd tend to agree with ctob 'those who aren't progressing, despite all the support from home, probably won't catch up with just some extra reads at school. So, I'd actually say the total opposite to your TA'. If they've good support and aren't progressing it suggests, to me, that there's additional problems which need addressing.
     

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