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Reading with expression

Discussion in 'Primary' started by mystery10, Jan 16, 2012.

  1. mystery10

    mystery10 Occasional commenter

    How do you teach it? I'm looking for some tips both as a volunteer and as a parent. I'm thinking about children on NC levels 1, 2 or 3.
    As a parent it's harder than as a volunteer as I find they don't like me "interfering" with their reading, but I know they can do it when they choose to. With one of them that is extremely rarely so I'm worried it will go completely rusty!! They've had plenty of modelling hearing good reading aloud both from me and audio books.
     
  2. mystery10

    mystery10 Occasional commenter

    How do you teach it? I'm looking for some tips both as a volunteer and as a parent. I'm thinking about children on NC levels 1, 2 or 3.
    As a parent it's harder than as a volunteer as I find they don't like me "interfering" with their reading, but I know they can do it when they choose to. With one of them that is extremely rarely so I'm worried it will go completely rusty!! They've had plenty of modelling hearing good reading aloud both from me and audio books.
     
  3. nick909

    nick909 Star commenter

    I've always seen it as something that comes with fluency - a reader who lacks fluency won't be able to read with expression, unless they've practised the text previously.
    I'd teach it to less confident readers by allowing them to become familiar with a piece of text first. Then, modelling and allowing child to practise.
    Fluency is still the key though. I've never found any other way to allow children to become fluent, other than lots of reading allowed.
     
  4. mystery10

    mystery10 Occasional commenter

    So maybe plays? It gives a "natural excuse" to read and re-read. I struggle to find ones that are a suitable reading level and that don't have a huge number of parts in them. Somewhere between 2 and 4 parts would be good for the family or volunteering situation.
     
  5. nick909

    nick909 Star commenter

    [​IMG]
    Ahem...
    aloud.
     
  6. chocolateworshipper

    chocolateworshipper Occasional commenter

    I think the key is to make reading fun. If the text tells you that a person is angry - make them SOUND angry (either when you are reading their speech or when you are talking about them in the third person). If you read that someone is "bored" - sound bored when you read that word. Emphasise words in italics (the author is telling you that this is the most important word in the sentence). Give the children lots of praise when you hear expression - tell them it is so much more interesting to listen to.

    Good luck!
     
  7. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    We read with "attitude" and practise reading text in different styles
     
  8. The best way to develop expression is to demonstrate to children what you mean by reading a passage to them and then asking them to read it back to you. If you are reading 1:1 with a child you can do this as you read through the book.
    It is also important to consider the reading level of the book. To develop fluency children need to be reading at the independent level NOT the instructional level.
     
  9. ShadowMan

    ShadowMan New commenter

    If you know they can, then why are you worried? Shy children will never read with expression. It's far too embarrassing. I never read with expression until I was at least 34.
     
  10. mystery10

    mystery10 Occasional commenter

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