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Reading diaries

Discussion in 'Early Years' started by kaz_allan, Aug 11, 2011.

  1. We have bought new diaries for sept for home-school links. Can anyone advise what info they put in it for parents.
    I was thinking of putting in the front ideas fr how to complete the diary with tips on helping with reading at the back.
    I havnt worked out exactly what to write yet but if anyone has already done this I would be so grateful to have a look and see if I could adapt it to our school.

    Thank you very much
     
  2. We have bought new diaries for sept for home-school links. Can anyone advise what info they put in it for parents.
    I was thinking of putting in the front ideas fr how to complete the diary with tips on helping with reading at the back.
    I havnt worked out exactly what to write yet but if anyone has already done this I would be so grateful to have a look and see if I could adapt it to our school.

    Thank you very much
     
  3. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    This is one I found
    As parents you are your child's most influential teacher with an important part to play in helping your child to learn to read.
    Here are some suggestions on how you can help to make this a positive experience.
    1. Choose a quiet time
    Set aside a quiet time with no distractions. Ten to fifteen minutes is usually long enough.
    2. Make reading enjoyable
    Make reading an enjoyable experience. Sit with your child. Try not to pressurise if he or she is reluctant. If your child loses interest then do something else.
    3. Be positive
    If your child says something nearly right to start with that is fine. Don't say 'No. That's wrong,' but 'Let's read it together' and point to the words as you say them. Boost your child's confidence with constant praise for even the smallest achievement.
    5. Regular practice
    Try to read with your child on most school days. 'Little and often' is best.
    6. Communicate
    When you hear your child read please write a short commentand any concerns in the reading diary. Your child will then know that you are interested in their progress and that you value reading.
    7. Talk about the books
    There is more to being a good reader than just being able to read the words accurately. Just as important is being able to understand what has been read. Always talk to your child about the book; about the pictures, the characters, how they think the story will end, their favourite part. You will then be able to see how well they have understood and you will help them to develop good comprehension skills.
    8. Variety is important
    Remember children need to experience a variety of reading materials eg. picture books, hard backs, comics, magazines, poems, and information books.

     
  4. Hi Debbie can i ask why you suggest learning the sounds before the letter names when the ELG states to know letter names and sounds
    The link you suggested above will be helpful to cut and paste as needed thanks
     
  5. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    Letter names are merely a convention and don't help a child to read or write. Teaching letter names before a child is secure in phonics knowledge confuses children who are just beginning to decode words.
    Point 4 LSL of the profile
    Links sounds to letters, naming and sounding letters of the alphabet is the only ELG that mentions knowing letter names and if the child has achieved the other 8 then they are probably ready to learn letter names . The proposed ELGs (Tickell Review) don't include this expectation
     

  6. Brilliant post, we've just got new diaries too and I had completely forgot about this! Saved me a job :)
     
  7. I suggest that it is fine for children to learn about 'The Alphabet' by singing an alphabet song with letter names - and learning about alphabetical order. Children also need to know about the finite bank of letter shapes.
    The Alphabet is also useful as a very simple alphabetic code for saying the letter shapes as their 'sounds' - and this teaches that capital letters are code for the same sound as their lower case equivalent letters.
    I would not overemphasise, however, children learning each letter shape by its name discretely until after the children have a firm grounding in blending for reading and segmenting for spelling using sounds.
    I would also make sure that I taught the 'alphabetic code', 'sounds' and the skills of blending and segmenting in a very core and thorough way and would never say things such as, 'that letter says its name' when teaching reading or spelling.
    I would also use sounds, at first, to repeat spellings. Saying letter names for spelling is a very sophisticated convention which plays no real part in the process of orally segmenting the spoken word for spelling.
    Even literate adults spell longer and new and challenging words via a 'sounds break down' and not by letter names.
    Further, I would never worry about advice from 'above' if I thought it was flawed. That is how I challenged the National Literacy Strategy advice and the 'searchlights reading strategies' many years ago. I was teaching with the synthetic phonics teaching prinicples years before they became well-known and promoted.

     

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