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Read write Inc in reception. Help and guidance please.

Discussion in 'Early Years' started by chubbyone, May 3, 2011.

  1. chubbyone

    chubbyone New commenter

    I am wondering if any one had any ideas or help they can give me'. I am currently being the RWI manager for the school and to date I have been able to run a very effective RWI programme to all of key stage 1 and children who require it in Ks2 ( i.e. Below a level 2a). It has been running since January and we are now doing our 3rd cycle of ability groups from the baselines as directed in the programme.
    When reception did their baseline assessment at the end of spring 2, the majority are still doing speed sounds but a group of children are according to the assessment ready to do ditties (b and c) and some are achieving the level to do (d) which is the first set of books. In addition to this 5 children are above this!!! So on paper you cod argue that you need a group doing speed sounds, a group doing ditties 1-20, a group doing ditties 21+ and a group going the books. If not then how are they being stretched and challenged?
    My question is how do you do this when they are in a very CI/ outdoor/ Indoor environment? Currently they have 30 mins max phonics each day where they are split into 4 groups and basically doing the same. The assessments show they are not all the same and over half are to be honest filling in time.
    How can I put a programme in place that in ks1 lasts an hour into reception where I would be lucky if they could manage 30 mins. The main issue I have is staff saying , which I do agree with, it goes against the eyfs if we do RWI, but from a RWI point of view they should be going more.?

    Hope this makes sense? Can anyone help or tell me' how they manage it. We are lucky in reception that there is 5 clear ability groups and there are enough staff to cover the groups.
     
  2. chubbyone

    chubbyone New commenter

    I am wondering if any one had any ideas or help they can give me'. I am currently being the RWI manager for the school and to date I have been able to run a very effective RWI programme to all of key stage 1 and children who require it in Ks2 ( i.e. Below a level 2a). It has been running since January and we are now doing our 3rd cycle of ability groups from the baselines as directed in the programme.
    When reception did their baseline assessment at the end of spring 2, the majority are still doing speed sounds but a group of children are according to the assessment ready to do ditties (b and c) and some are achieving the level to do (d) which is the first set of books. In addition to this 5 children are above this!!! So on paper you cod argue that you need a group doing speed sounds, a group doing ditties 1-20, a group doing ditties 21+ and a group going the books. If not then how are they being stretched and challenged?
    My question is how do you do this when they are in a very CI/ outdoor/ Indoor environment? Currently they have 30 mins max phonics each day where they are split into 4 groups and basically doing the same. The assessments show they are not all the same and over half are to be honest filling in time.
    How can I put a programme in place that in ks1 lasts an hour into reception where I would be lucky if they could manage 30 mins. The main issue I have is staff saying , which I do agree with, it goes against the eyfs if we do RWI, but from a RWI point of view they should be going more.?

    Hope this makes sense? Can anyone help or tell me' how they manage it. We are lucky in reception that there is 5 clear ability groups and there are enough staff to cover the groups.
     
  3. mystery10

    mystery10 Occasional commenter

    Sorry I am not the right person to ask, but just some thoughts. If you go on the OUP website you will see the names of schools that are RWI model schools. You could perhaps pick out schools that you feel you could learn from and ask them how they do it ........ ones with good literacy results, similar size to your school etc.
    Maybe these schools would also be able tell you how they justify RWI to staff who think that it "goes against the EYFS" . Why do you yourself feel it goes against the EYFS? I'm only a parent, but I've read all the EYFS bumph over the years, and RWI teacher handbooks etc and I don't feel it "goes against the EYFS".
    Also, you could develop the children who are "filling in time" without necessarily using RWI as such. Msz might have some good ideas here - from what she has written in these forums she picks and chooses what she feels is best and gets great results.
    I'm a bit puzzled by your end sentence - "we are lucky in reception that there is 5 clear ability groups and there are enough staff to cover the groups". If this is the case, why can't they each do appropriate phonic tasks in their ability groups for part of the day?
    It's great that you are trying to solve this problem. It's sad if children are already "filling in time" in reception. One might be able to understand this problem for a superbright child in year 6 who has gone way beyond the capabilities of every teacher in the school, but it's sad if this is already happening in reception.
    Also I was a bit puzzled by "the majority are still doing speed sounds" - from the rest of your message I presume you mean speed sounds set 1?
    From what you have written, I would suggest that the progress through the phonic sounds and reading levels is slow in your class compared with, say, the progress that Msz reports she used to have in her reception classes. In addition to this if half the class are marking time it doesn't sound as though your current approach is going to lead to the leaps forward that you may need.
    Good luck.

     
  4. We have one class of 26 children and we have 3 TAs who also teach the smaller RWI groups. The sessions last for about 45 / 50 minutes at the moment (those children in higher groups have an hour long session - I finish early !). I'm not sure what you mean when you say 'carpet based' - even the lower groups need to work at tables for the handwriting and the 'Fred Fingers' activities.
    We do have snack time, just not in RWI time :)

     
  5. mystery10

    mystery10 Occasional commenter

    chubby one, there was something in one of your posts which made me wonder just how you were assessing which part of the RWI scheme to place children on. It sounded as though you had some children going over speed set 1 sounds again and again because they make 5 or more mistakes on them. I don't see this in the phonics handbook as part of the placement assessment - pages 28 onwards.
    Don't be like my daughter's school - she started speed set 2 in January so far as I can tell and so far has been taught 4 sounds from speed set 2 since then!! What's the point? I hasten to add it's nothing to do with my daughter; more that they don't run the groups very often, and when they do they just seem to go over the old sounds again and again. There's even a child from year 3 in her group (she's in reception). How is this child ever going to learn to read if they don't expose them to all the sounds rather faster than this?
    The thing they haven't worked out in my children's school is what to do when a member of staff is away. So they run the groups with all the reception and KS1 staff, but on the days a member of staff is away (very often) they don't run the groups. And they don't send anything home for parents to practise with their children - or for children to do for themselves - so all the practice takes place in the sessions which are few and far between - so they never move on. It is truly farcical.
    Good luck with it; some schools get fantastic results with it, some more mediocre - model yourself on the true models and you'll be great.
     
  6. chubbyone

    chubbyone New commenter

    Mystery the assessments we have done are the ones in the handbook. We started RWI in key stage 1 in January after we dud the baseline in December. Groups were done and then we assessed again using assessment 2 at the end of spring 1, regrouped then just before Easter using assessment 2 to regroup for this term. When I did the training a question was asked if they need to get all the sounds intact to say they are that level and was told use own judgement but as a thumb rule if a child makes 5 or more mistakes then they have not achieved that level. When wr fo them therefore if they get 5 mistakes or more we say they are to be taught that level, also we say they have to have all the sounds in the boxes done except for box A. This was because we will filling in gaps and because of the turn around of groups those who say have one sound missing but can read all the words soon move up 2 groups as they accelerate their learning and also fill in gaps. The exception for this is speed sounds as tge assessments ate given to the teacher who has that group or what I have done as rWI manager is said you need to revisit these sounds but teach these as the ones the majority know are just shown but for argument sake no one had 's' ticked or 80% of group haven't then it is taught but if all bare a couple know it then it is just shown and revised.

    I agree with you in some schools it works in others no, as it stands in ours it is the push the children need and touch wood it is working. Some say it doesn't work for their schools for various reasons. The added nightmare I have in organising it as I could have 120 children who have groups ranging from A to know it all into 14 teaching groups of which 4 are teachers and the rest very able and brilliant teaching assistants , into 10 teaching areas ensuring teachers have the larger groups! It works brilliantly when everyone is in and thankfully only once has an adult been in due to illness so for the first day I did the group instead of ppa for an hour then unfortunately the 10 children stayed in their classes and missed phonics for the 4 days but the 110 other children still it. I have a supportive senco and deputy who will always put any additional adults in for phonics cover if an adult is absent.
    Have to say because of the logistic nightmare that it is if we were not getting the results and progress or impact on learning it would not be done.
     

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