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read write inc how in FS?

Discussion in 'Early Years' started by teentiny, Feb 18, 2011.

  1. Had INSET on read write inc; latest answer to my school's woes. Feeling completely overwhelmed and can't sort out how to impliment this is Reception. Trainer very energetic and enthusiastic but no help as seemed to be ex-KS2 teacher. She said yr R could do about 30 minute sessions daily...... but we were advised by advisor to keep large group focus time to 10-15 mins max. If we break activities into small group work this will be all our adult group work time so no PSRN etc with adult lead groups. At the moment we split classes 3 or 4 ways for letters and sounds with each group working at differentiated level for about 15 mins.

    Is anyone using readwriteinc in Yr R? How do you fit everything in?
     
  2. Had INSET on read write inc; latest answer to my school's woes. Feeling completely overwhelmed and can't sort out how to impliment this is Reception. Trainer very energetic and enthusiastic but no help as seemed to be ex-KS2 teacher. She said yr R could do about 30 minute sessions daily...... but we were advised by advisor to keep large group focus time to 10-15 mins max. If we break activities into small group work this will be all our adult group work time so no PSRN etc with adult lead groups. At the moment we split classes 3 or 4 ways for letters and sounds with each group working at differentiated level for about 15 mins.

    Is anyone using readwriteinc in Yr R? How do you fit everything in?
     
  3. What is the expectation of the senior management in your school?
    If it's to implement a new systematic phonics programme, then should you be sticking with what you have done before - or implement the programme according to its design.
    I can't answer these questions for you, but it seems to me that you are saying you are supposed to implement the programme, but you want to stick with past practice but just use some new resources.
    So, back to your inschool brief....
     
  4. I have experience from working in an RWI school a few years ago, and successfully implemented it in reception. If your school wants to use it as a systematic phonics programme throughout, then go with it; it does get results, and it doesn't mean you have to stop all your other CLLD provision.
    We started the children on the programme a few weeks into the Autumn Term, and worked through Set 1 (at a rate of about 4 sounds per week) in sessions of about 20 minutes. When Set 1 was finished, we started Set 2 and the Ditties - these sessions would take up to 45 minutes (approx.) and we'd sometimes get through all the children with a ditty (in groups of about 6), and sometimes we'd take two days (with 24 children split into 4 groups - sometimes 2 groups per day/sometimes all 4 - the other groups would either do the handwriting sheet, or play literacy games: bingo, etc while my TA and I worked on the ditties).
    When the children were reading confidently, we'd split the class again - some children would move on to the Green Books with me, and my TA would work more with the children needing a little more help and support. We never put reception children in with the rest of KS1, and sometimes had problems with 'setting' our very youngest Y1s in the Autumn - the young, more-able children found it tough being in with sometimes, much-older children.
    The system certainly works though, and I've bought the resources for my current class, even though we're not an RWI school - I love them!! Good luck, and be enthusiastic - it really pays off!
     
  5. I have just had 2 days read write inc phonics training and the school I am on placement in a reception class and the school are following the scheme. I felt the same about the training- it was mostly aimed at ks1 and above, not much on reception.
    The children are learning speed sounds 1. We begin the session by saying the sounds and writing the graphemes in the air. Use the flash cards- the letter side should be shown and the children say the sound and then turn it to the letter side with the picture, the children should write the letter in the air and say the phrase that goes with the letter.
    Next, the class split into smaller groups. One group works on an activity independently for example, reading CVC words and matching them to pictures or segmenting CVC words. Another group works with an adult doing an activity for example, hold a sentence for more able or listening activities/ initial sounds activities for children who are less able. Then a group can stay on the carpet and work on an activity on the IWB.
    The sessions are about 20 minutes long. A couple of the more able children go into yr1 for their phonics session.
     
  6. mystery10

    mystery10 Occasional commenter

    Did your school buy the "proper" Read Write Inc training from Oxford University Press or do their own thing, or buy in some other trainer?
     
  7. We had the 'proper' training - I really enjoyed it actually, and the whole school uses some of the strategies across the entire curriculum!
     
  8. mystery10

    mystery10 Occasional commenter

    Do you think the training tinkeranabell describes was not the proper training? I was puzzled by her saying that did not really cover reception very much, as a major part of the course as described in the RWI phonics handbook is definitely aimed at reception.
    My children's school recently started to run the RWI programme, And I don't think they had the proper training and as a consequence I think they are hashing it up and progressing too slowly through it. Even my younger daughter who turned up at school knowing all the single letter sounds and some digraphs, and able to read, sound, blend, is still only part way through speed sounds set 2 ........ so where that leaves the rest of them I have no clue!!
    I think even a good read of the phonics handbook (and some other book with lessonplans in) might have prepared all the staff better than the whatever the training was they did receive.

     
  9. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    Yes it sounds like the training run by RWI and no it isn't very early years friendly in fact I didn't find it KS1 friendly ...
     
  10. mystery10

    mystery10 Occasional commenter

    Gosh, how does that fit then with the scheme handbook? In what way was it not reception or KS1 friendly?
     
  11. We did RWInc in my last school and although we began with a few concerns (namely that it would take over everything) we were quickly converted and the results were fantastic. You must make sure that the chidlren are at the right level in the scheme, which is why it needs to be a whole school approach, and the chidlren who are ready, zoom through. We began the scheme by teaching all FS2 the speed sounds, then a significant chunk of children moved on to ditties. As we were a FS unit, after Christmas, we got the chidlren who were in FS1 to join the ones who were in speed sounds group , leaving the other FS1 chdilren to do phase 1. As time progressed, because of man power, our better FS2 children would go to the year 1 teacher for their phonics 3 times a week - each teacher /TA was assigned a group ( I started with ditties and as I moved to year 2 got the greys). As we were a small inner city school, it was easy to do this and the results were quick. The majority of the children who had started it in FS2, by the middle of year 1 had almost completed the scheme. It's not as wishy washy as letters and sounds, in fact it is very prescriptive. When it comes to the blends and diagraphs the children love the little rhymes. Remember the whole idea is to get the children equiped to read as quickly as possible and RWinc does that.
    My current school uses jolly phonics aloingside letters and sounds and I must confess, I use RWinc with my FS2 children and they love it. I have a group of children who are already phase 4 (as well as those who still phase 1 - not ready to hear sounds yet) but it works. I know not everyone likes it .... but I do!
     
  12. We have been using RWI for two years now from Reception onwards. We have seen brilliant results, especially with children who are more able and can move to groups in Year 1 or 2 and for SEN who can stay in a group appropriate to their ability. I have also seen dyslexic children improve their reading ability really well.
    We only do 3 RWI sessions a week which leaves two days to be a little more creative in language lessons. Each member of staff stays with the same group and reports back on progress - we go at the pace the children can cope with - more able are flying through Set 1 sounds and on ditties. I would say that children have to be ready for RWI, some of my Reception found it all too much in Autumn Term but are coping with it really well this term. We start the session with rhythms and rhymes together, the split into groups and spend 30 minutes on task. The secret is to keep it at high pace, changing tasks and loads of praise.
    The best part of RWI was that the whole school had training together, and at last, the Junior staff now have an understanding of what we do in early years. The worst part is when staff are away or on courses, and we have to double up groups which are at different levels. However - more good points than bad!

     
  13. Thank you for taking time to reply.
    We had "proper" training but apart from being pointed to hand book pages regarding Yr R not much was said. Book says longish session focused on RWinc in large groups. At present we're using Jolly phonics and working through letters and sounds and have children ranging from phase 2 to 4. Whole school moving over to RWinc after half term.
    I'm not doubting results it's how to fit it to FS principles of working. We have a unit with 2 Yr R classes so could split into smaller groups and have agreed to give up teaching cursive writing as told "it's not allowed". If we can arrange short large group teaching thenfollowed by small focus groups and still have time for adults to do all the other things so essential to learning and development in other curriculum areas I'll be happy.
     
  14. mystery10

    mystery10 Occasional commenter

    llygoden, if you compare progress in your school on 3 days per week with the post directly before yours, what do you think? The post before yours says that they get the majority of children who started in year r to have nearly completed the Read Write Inc phonics scheme part way through Year 1. Are you achieving the same?

    My children go to a school that says that it is has implemented read write inc, but if you compare what is going on at school with the scheme handbook, and what takes place in the model school it is nothing like.
    They do a max of 2 hours per week in year 1, a lot of weeks it doesn't seem to happen, and it's just stupid and illogical because their reading is ahead of the scheme. As it's supposed to be a phonics based way to learn to read this seems utterly pointless to me.
    I could not understand why in year 1 my daughter did not seem to know much about certain sounds, now I realise they were labouring their way so slowly through the scheme that she had not complete speed sounds set 2 at that point, and now in year 2 is only completing set 3 speed sounds, despite being a free reader.
    A read of the handbook shows just what a mockery of the scheme this is. Is the training purchased from RWI really that bad?
     
  15. mystery10

    mystery10 Occasional commenter

    Oops, I also forgot to say that there is a list of Read Write Inc model schools on the OUP website. You can visit them free of charge to find out more about how they run it. I guess you find out which was a "model" model before you visited as some of them may be better at it than others!!
     
  16. My Ht has said the Yr R staff can go and visit a model school to see RWinc in action in Reception. I guess Nursery continue to use phase 1 letters and sounds. I like letters and sounds and it has worked well for us in Yr r but in KS1 it hasn't worked as staff haven't got thw same enthusiasm for it so time for something new. The main thing about the RWinc trainer was her enthusiasm which was infectious!
     
  17. Our nursery introduces the sounds to those children interested and able, but only show how to write them if the children try to write them. It works really well and they come into reception motivated and ready (on the whole). This is all alongside Phase 1.
     

  18. Yes it was proper training, I had a two day course at university. It was useful but it was very much focused on telling you about when children had grasped all of the sounds and letter formation and were able to read confidently. It was demomstrated how you would use the cards to teach the sounds and write them but that's about it. No activities were really suggested for the FS.
     

  19. Yes it was proper training, I had a two day course at university. It was useful but it was very much focused on telling you about when children had grasped all of the sounds and letter formation and were able to read confidently. It was demomstrated how you would use the cards to teach the sounds and write them but that's about it. No activities were really suggested for the FS.
     
  20. mystery10

    mystery10 Occasional commenter

    Sorry I wasn't being very clear there, I meant was it the training provided by Read Write Inc (OUP) themselves?
     

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