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Reaction to Ofqual Report

Discussion in 'English' started by pippin35, Aug 31, 2012.

  1. Yep our moderation report was gushing about the accuracy of our assessment.
    Our students were penalised because of our accuracy.
    AQA and OFQUAL are saying that being accurate is detrimental to your students - the obvious outcome is that schools who are accurate decide to deliberately overmark so as not to disadvantage their students.
    And to think they say honesty pays!

     
  2. vacherin

    vacherin New commenter

    To some extent honesty does pay as you run the risk of falling out of tolerance and having all marks changed if you choose to play the dangerous game of trying to inflate the marks which students deserve.
     
  3. You are right, of course. But it still doesn't feel right.

     
  4. Of course if we did deliberately try to overmark a bit and fall out of tolerance then we'd have our marks adjusted to the required level .... which is exactly where we were already in our marking this year!
    Where is the downside?
    Not that we would because it's about our professional honesty but it shows the stupidity of the system!


     
  5. You mention not ignoring spelling errors, lack of capitals and lack of punctuation. I am interested to know where does that leave Students with Dyslexia? These Students may be articulate in some areas more than others.
    English is a complex and diverse subject and we do have to have a common standard but if you look back over the last twenty years our needs of communication are now very different. If common standards change year in year out and even mid year then how do Teachers gage that?
    Most people would agree that the standard required for articulating a letter back in the O Level era are now obsolete. I also think that language and communication skills develop with age. I have recently read remarks made by "older" individuals that young people can not do what they can do in the world of communication at work, I am pretty sure the "older" generation were not communicating as effectively in their younger days.
    I also can't get my head around how boards can mark down all Students CA's without even viewing them, despite the fact that the moderated batch were praised for accuracy.
     
  6. No idea why my last post did not use your quote as requested but as previous post.....

    You mention not ignoring spelling errors, lack of capitals and lack of punctuation. I am interested to know where does that leave Students with Dyslexia? These Students may be articulate in some areas more than others.
    English is a complex and diverse subject and we do have to have a common standard but if you look back over the last twenty years our needs of communication are now very different. If common standards change year in year out and even mid year then how do Teachers gage that?
    Most people would agree that the standard required for articulating a letter back in the O Level era are now obsolete. I also think that language and communication skills develop with age. I have recently read remarks made by "older" individuals that young people can not do what they can do in the world of communication at work, I am pretty sure the "older" generation were not communicating as effectively in their younger days.
    I also can't get my head around how boards can mark down all Students CA's without even viewing them, despite the fact that the moderated batch were praised for accuracy.
     
  7. sleepyhead

    sleepyhead New commenter

    When you examine, you mark what you see. In my paper, only half is marked for spg so dyslexic students (not that I would know that they were) can do just as well as non-dyslexic students. In the writing section, our most dyslexic students are often entitled to a scribe. Whilst they still have to direct the spg to their scribe, it does take away the barrier of having to hold the pen.

    As for your comment about CAs, are you saying yours were praised for accuracy but the marks you'd awarded we're moderated down?
     
  8. markuss

    markuss Occasional commenter

    One clue you sometimes get to indicate that you're marking the script of someone with dyslexia is the colour of the answer paper!
    Of course, if spelling is part of the assessment, then someone with poor spelling will have it held against them, as you might say - whatever the reason behind it.
    However, spelling is only one bit of Writing, and Writing is only one bit of English.
    (I'd have thought that dyslexia would have a bigger impact on the Reading. You can't have a Reader helping a candidate in a Reading assessment, can you?)
     
  9. Why do you say that?
     
  10. markuss

    markuss Occasional commenter

    Say what?
     
  11. sleepyhead

    sleepyhead New commenter

    No, you can't.
    Spelling is worth relatively little, even as a proportion of the writing mark, as I am sure you know.
     
  12. markuss

    markuss Occasional commenter

    Absolutely. Quite right, too, I think.
     
  13. sleepyhead

    sleepyhead New commenter

    Don't let the Daily Mail hear you say that! They'll be outraged.
     
  14. I could not agree more. By all means collar the centres that adopted underhand practices but do not penalise the pupils for others misdemeanours. Best of all send off the controlled assessments to the board to mark and have unannounced checks made on schools to inspect what methods the school uses to let pupils do their CAS, Best of all abolish them but keep modular examinations.

     

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