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Rates of pay for Exam markers???

Discussion in 'Education news' started by slingshotsally, Mar 12, 2016.

  1. slingshotsally

    slingshotsally Star commenter

    Hi All,

    I have just clicked "Become a marker" advert and I can find lots of information regarding how to apply but nothing whatsoever in rates?

    Does anyone know? Do they pay different rates for different subjects? Are they not complying with minimum wage?

    SSS
     
  2. Scintillant

    Scintillant Star commenter

    Hi, I am an expert examiner (science) for one of the major boards. I've been doing it for many years and find the pay and workload to be fine - but then my teaching workload is also reasonable and it allows me the time to mark.

    The hourly rate works out very well in my opinion, there's a bonus for completing on time (which I have never had any concerns over as there is more than ample time) and there is the option at the end of marking to do extra for a higher rate of pay. I sometimes do more, depends on my mood. It pays for my summer off.

    Go for it. You won't get great pay straight off, but it's still fine and in a few years you can be earning pretty decently.
     
    wanet likes this.
  3. slingshotsally

    slingshotsally Star commenter

    Thanks, Scintillant.

    We are in dire straits at the moment and car about the clap-right-out at any moment, so need to look at all opportunities!

    SSS
     
  4. wanet

    wanet Star commenter

    It might be late to apply for this year, generally contracted by now. rate of pay depends upon how fast you can mark.
     
  5. pixiewixiepixie

    pixiewixiepixie Occasional commenter

    "but nothing whatsoever in rates?"

    There's a reason for that!!

    Most teachers refuse to mark because

    a) the hourly pay is awful (sub minimum wage) once you include all the extra time you have to invest to do the things you aren't paid for.

    b) It's immoral. You have to mark so quickly to try and earn a decent wage that you cannot mark properly. The result is a bonanza of lucrative re-mark fees for the exam boards, but only from schools who can afford it - poor students miss out.

    c) It's immoral. The pay is so poor, the jobs are usually advertised as 'excellent professional development'. You will work like a donkey whilst the exam boards rake in hundreds of millions in fees and pay themselves eye-watering sums - and most have charitable status!

    d) It's immoral. The exam board have not made any effort to change (because of the vast sums they make). The are very happy to keep as many people as possible working in essentially a piece-rate cottage industry instead of working out how to create full-time jobs from all the different tasks that have to be done, apart from marking and moderating.

    Many teachers have boycotted this part of the education business. Avoid them and change will be forced on them and everyone will benefit (accept the Executive Board members of the 'charities', who may not get their million pound bonuses).
     
  6. applecrumblebumble

    applecrumblebumble Lead commenter

    And how accurately you can mark.
    There may be some work in the core subjects and typically £800 - 900 after tax about £650 - 750 in your pocket.
     
  7. wanet

    wanet Star commenter

    If you mark online then you are told the rate. But you won't know how fast you can mark. If you are good at marking then the rate is not that bad. If you are slow then it won't be. For online marking there is little else to do. Some boards pay for moderation, others include it in the script fee.

    The extras are more important for moderation. In my experience the extra work gets created when schools don't do what is expected and you have to chase them. Exam boards could solve this by fining schools and paying this to moderators.
     
  8. BillyBobJoe

    BillyBobJoe Established commenter

    Works out about £25-30/hour for me, but that's marking maths. I suspect if you mark English or history it doesn't look so rosy.
     
  9. Compassman

    Compassman Star commenter

    Despite having left teaching I am still doing marking.

    In fact I start some next week. I have more free time in the evenings and weekends now to do it!

    I would agree though that marking English or History would be pretty hard work. However, Science or Maths is fairly easy and you can rattle off quite a few sets of questions in an evening.
     
    Last edited: Mar 12, 2016
  10. Skeoch

    Skeoch Lead commenter

    This discussion has been had previously... But my experience limited to one examining board but different levels is this: marking accurately is important. If you don't, you get stopped from marking and don't get paid; if you mark badly at the standardisation stage you get intercepted quickly and either put back on track or taken off the marking. Seems fair I think. Most markers are pretty accurate, and accuracy doesn't seem in my experience to correlate with speed - some of the best markers I've come across have been fast. With online marking there's next to no unpaid admin, as the computer does that for you. Rate of pay if you are a reasonably fast marker is acceptable - of course we'd all like more - and I would think £25 per hour is readily achievable. The hassle comes with odd scripts that won't go through the computer system and I think those are underpaid per hour. As for re-marks - the ones I've seen are either correct or very very close to being correct; I can see that Centres will see a candidate who is very close to a grade boundary and apply for a re-mark as being a worthwhile gamble, as being marked down by a mark or two won't influence a grade.
    I can see the argument for full-time markers but I can't see the practicality. By their nature these exams are seasonal - beyond the six weeks or so of the exam season, what would these full-time markers be doing?
     
    wanet likes this.

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