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"Teachers don't do filing or photocopying" - Radio Scotland

Discussion in 'Scotland - education news' started by xmal, Sep 13, 2011.

  1. xmal

    xmal Occasional commenter

    Just listened to a report by RS's education correspondent stating that teacher work no more than 12.5 hours over and above contact time and that we don't have to do our own photocopying or filing. How can someone whose full time job is to be an education reporter be so wrong or is she just a government mouthpiece?
     
  2. Wow. Someone should give her a class of her own for a term and see if she still thinks this.
     
  3. I just dropped a line to the ITC and Press Complaints Commission - I suggest we all do - but this, true, also smells strongly of SNP scripted balderdash rather than journalistic cut'n'pastery
     
  4. We do now...
     
  5. catmother

    catmother Star commenter

    When didn't we?
    The only reason we do not physically do the photocopying is because the school doesn't allow us to do it for financial control reasons (or just control???/). We still have to prepare what needs photocopying.
    As for filing,who else is going to do it?
     
  6. Exactly!
    I do a lot of my own or get the kids to file it in their own folder. I wonder who the public thinks does our filing??? I don't get any PSW time, but if I did they would be working with the kids - not doing filing!
     
  7. I think the point they were trying to make is that teachers need to be more flexible in their approach to work... most teachers do not work for more than 12.5 hrs outwith school time per week. Be honest! that's 2.5 hrs for 5 nights out of 7, every week , no nights off (including Friday).

    If you work more than this then something is wrong with your work practice/time management/knowledge of subject. Also remember we only work 40 weeks per year. Even with 12.5 hrs evening/weekend work that only brings us up to what other professional people work on a similar salary.

    Teaching is hard work , but other jobs are hard too! Stop bemoaning and look to the positive side of your job - you get the chance to influence the next generation of young people most of whom are great. You also never work public holidays, have every weekend off , fab holidays and a good pension.

    If you don't like your job - look for something else. Young people are too important to be 'taught' by those who don't want to be there.
     
  8. holdingon

    holdingon Occasional commenter

    are you part of cosla by any chance ?
    how much thinking time connected with your job per week then?
     
  9. xmal

    xmal Occasional commenter

    PMJB, if teaching is such a cushy number why not give up your job (whatever that is) and join the profession?
     
  10. Yes, I have to say that's very true - and I've taught for nigh on forty years. I have sons in other professions and the work they are expected to do at night - in addition to heavily laden days - is phenomenal. We tend to forget that other jobs are highly stressful too - and, dare I say it, the bullying is far worse than in teaching. To illustrate, can you imagine doing your own job and another teacher's for three weeks straight? For no extra reward? One of my sons has just done that.
    We're yelping at the moment because we are no longer being treated as a protected species. This approach has been standard in other jobs for decades now.
    I have every sympathy with teachers, I really do, but I think we often live in a bubble.
     
  11. sbf

    sbf

    So what we are saying because in other jobs employers take advantage of their employees (to profit shareholder) and bully them etc we should accept that in teaching.
    Fair enough just wanted to clear that up!

     
  12. There needs to be an arbitration of skills - teachers who generate their own resources may take more than the assumed time to compose lessons, departmental units etc. There are some teachers who can play a PC keyboard like Lizst, others (certainly me up until three years ago) who *** at new technology like cavemen.
    Quality CPD is the keynote aspect of Mcormac that I'm all for. No more snake-oil peddlers, please, no more charismatic svengalis and more hands-on training, in-class coaches etc.

    Resolve this and then government can reasonably argue the case for hours outwith school hours - at the moment when you have some PTs who couldn't delegate well to save their lives or LAs whose CPD menu is more McDonald's than Mccormac we have an issue.
     
  13. Flyonthewall75

    Flyonthewall75 New commenter

    Quality CPD was also supposed to be part of the 'McCrone' Agreement.
    Did it actually happen?
    What teachers want, and need, from CPD will not necessarily be what schools, the LAs and the SG want to provide, particularly if there are LA, and National, priorities and funding is scarce.
     
  14. kibosh

    kibosh Star commenter

    Yes. It seems the needs of the latest initiative/drive must always be met first, well before the needs of individual teachers, departments or schools.
     
  15. categed

    categed New commenter

    My minimum time in school is 271/2h per week not including a weekly 1hour meeting and a fortnightly 1h meeting so that is 29h per week I am in school minmum. So I only have 6 hours a week on top of my 2.5h for planning and prep, parents meeting, reviews and meetings with other professionals etc. (I do my 2.5 hours ncct in school).

    As I work in ASN I spend a lot of time making resources that are suitable for my class, I have a very small class but everything that we do has to be symbolised and objects of reference created etc. Even planning seems to take more time (I am still fairly new to ASN so this may be why) as I try to think how to create lessons that are age and stage appropriate and that will engage my class and help them to develop.

    I normally work in school for around 40+hours and do more at home just to ensure that I am up to date with planning and resources and my pupils. I don't mind until people tell me that I have such an easy life only working 35h/week and 12 weeks off a year...
     
  16. Amen to that...especially the £80/hour 'facilitators' with whiteboard marker in hand who ask us all what we should do, write down every point made, then present these as the answers to our problems! Cha-Ching!!!
     
  17. I assume the 30 hours I spent the last week of the holidays preparing for the new term don't count towards anything either?

    Given that the list of things I shouldn't do hasn't actually disappeared yet, I'm going to visit the school office first thing in the morning - I have a filing tray crying out for help, because I haven't had a chance to deal with it yet. Being pretty new to all this teaching malarky I didn't realise that I wasn't meant to do my own filing [​IMG] Maybe that's why I seem to work so many more hours than 35 per week - not that I'm complaining at all, I love my job and am grateful to have secured a job in current climate - but obviously I'm spending too much time filing, photocopying, putting up wall displays.....
     
  18. Really? What hope do we have if people don't even know what their terms of employment are.
     
  19. Oh I do...
    My point (which I obviously didn't make clearly enough) was that I haven't seen any teacher hand over their filing to someone else to do. And any wall displays that I have put up (or have seen colleagues putting up) have been done by ourselves. We don't HAVE teaching assistants to do this for us... so we have the choice - DIY (despite the fact that we shouldn't) or don't bother....
     
  20. Actually, before the squeeze on technicians, there was a time when they could be deployed in school for filing and photocopying purposes. The trouble with a lot of teachers' work is that basic filing often requires a degree of subject knowledge for it really to be an aid to the teacher. Heading reports and clearing away test-tubes is one thing, but technicians were never going to be able to fulfil the role of a good PA in business.
    (And actually, a former PA was one of the best school assistants I ever came across).
     

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