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Quitting PGCE

Discussion in 'Trainee and student teachers' started by beecee, Nov 15, 2005.

  1. I have been thinking about quitting my PGCE for a couple of weeks now but for some reason I feel very scared about doing so. I have been reading some of your comments and I agree with a number of things that have been said. I have felt lonely on my placement even though I believe I am a very sociable, bubbly person. The work load is quite big but no more than I expected it to be and that isn't whats making me want to leave. To be honest I don't know what it is that I want to do with my life and decided to try teaching because I love children and am good at maths. However although I've quite enjoyed the learning part at uni, since I have been in school I have had second thoughts. Ever since I decided to get on the course (admittedly right at the last minute) I have worried I made the wrong decision and some how it just hasn't felt right. I'm scared that if I leave I'll regret it and in a few months time want to be back on the course. But then I just don't think I'd be feeling like this if that was the case. It's not that I don't think I can cope or anything like that I just don't think the concept of teaching is for me. I was wondering if there is anyone else who is feeling the same or has felt like this before and would be grateful for any advice?
     
  2. I have been thinking about quitting my PGCE for a couple of weeks now but for some reason I feel very scared about doing so. I have been reading some of your comments and I agree with a number of things that have been said. I have felt lonely on my placement even though I believe I am a very sociable, bubbly person. The work load is quite big but no more than I expected it to be and that isn't whats making me want to leave. To be honest I don't know what it is that I want to do with my life and decided to try teaching because I love children and am good at maths. However although I've quite enjoyed the learning part at uni, since I have been in school I have had second thoughts. Ever since I decided to get on the course (admittedly right at the last minute) I have worried I made the wrong decision and some how it just hasn't felt right. I'm scared that if I leave I'll regret it and in a few months time want to be back on the course. But then I just don't think I'd be feeling like this if that was the case. It's not that I don't think I can cope or anything like that I just don't think the concept of teaching is for me. I was wondering if there is anyone else who is feeling the same or has felt like this before and would be grateful for any advice?
     
  3. If you think that you can stick at it til July, then i would advise you to, even if you have decided that right now a career in teaching isn't for you. You never know..you mihgt change your mind in the future and by completing the course, you will have no regrets in years to come.

    Blade
     
  4. Dear beecee,
    I can empathise with your feelings. I was so keen to get on the course and am feeling equally overwhelmed at this stage. I think, though, it's really about being new in the school, starting at the bottom and feeling the pressure to perform, as the course is so short and assessment begins early. This time last year I had started as a teaching assistant at another school and thought it was all a bit much, but after the first three months I felt settled and really started enjoying it and even took on more responsibility. I suggest you keep going for now, at least until Christmas. Just take one week at a time and try to accept its tough to begin with but can only get easier. Good luck.
     
  5. I know exactly how you feel. I really thought I would enjoy it alot more, instead I just feel disappointed. I am deciding whether to leave at the moment. It also doesn't help that I feel like I am not very good at it.

    Gx
     
  6. You're not very good at it because you are learning!!! If anyone could just go and do the job there wouldn't be the need for the PGCE.

    It IS hard work, especially the first placement where you feel like you have been thrown in at the deep end but keep going. The next placement is a bit better (and a brand new school where you can reinvent yourself cos none of the staff or kids know the mistakes you made before..!), then your NQT year gets a bit better, then the year after that...etc

    Maybe try to keep a journal where you write down all the good things that have happened eg moments you have observed or things you did well.

    But I really would advise you give it more of a chance before you jack it in - as Blade says if you can stick at it til July then do.
     
  7. Did you really all think that the first few lessons you taught were going to be perfect? Come on, where's the stamina, determination and perserverance I'm sure you all quoted in your personal statements?
     
  8. I am really keen to become a teacher but really disheartened by some of the lesson I've taught recently - the kids don't care about learning my subjects (citizenship and RE) and I'm finding it hard to remember the passion for the career that I used to have! But I keep telling myself that it's a great qualification to have and there are few more worthwhile ways of spending a year in terms of what you learn about yourself, even if you don't end up being a teacher. I'm sure I WILL end up teaching next year and that this is just a bad patch...if you can manage to hang on in there I imagine you'll be glad one day.
     
  9. sarahspot

    sarahspot New commenter

    Just been reading some of these messages. I just want to encourage you. I did my PGCE last year, and am currently on my first teaching post. I wont tell you how many times I wanted to quit.... especially around Christmas, then again half way through as it got tougher. However... I will tell you now... I am SO SO glad I didn't! Oh teaching is wonderful! I love it so much! Ok, it has its ups and downs as any job does, but in all, its ace. So... try to see past the course. Press on to the goal and you will be so pleased! Its only a year after all (less than that), and now I look back kand am so thankful for it!
     
  10. All I can tell you is I really want to teach but today I came home and thought I'm not sure that I want to do this. My advice stick with it - you do not have your own school, your own pupils not your own classroam and this can make a huge difference to moral. If it is not for you at the end of the course at least you have QTS and a whole load of stories to tell.
     
  11. So glad that I clicked on this link because I'm feeling exactly the same! Today has been my lowest point so far and I seriously considered quitting tonight. I'm still in two minds but I don't think it helps that I don't get on with my class teacher and I only got 4 hours sleep last night! For three years now, all I've wanted to do is teach. Probabaly like many others who post on this sight, I couldn't imagine myself doing anything else and yet now I'm having serious doubts and I'm feeling confused and a bit lost. Im a bit fed up of feeling sad! It's reassuring to know that others are feeling the same.

    Keep us posted on how you get on.

    xxx
     
  12. I have already told my tutor I am quitting the PGCE.

    I just felt like I wasn't coping with it at all (workload)and really resented the hours I spent away from my husband and 18 month old.

    My lessons were good and interesting, but I didn't like the behaviour management side of the teaching. I think kids should behave! Maybe I'm a bit long in the tooth for all and this is my oldie attitude coming out!

    That said however, I'm now looking for jobs and everything seems so dull!

    Oh **** have I made the wrong decision?
     
  13. Tigger1962

    Tigger1962 New commenter

    I think that the most important thing to remember about learning to be a teacher is that it is not a linear process where you just gradually improve the up's are followed by down's - often just when you thought hat you were getting the hang of it- but if you look over the general trend you will have improved.

    November is generally a tough time - as is March - these are generally grey and wet months where everthing seems much more difficult It's also a long period with little break. A friend who works in SEN tells me that the children seem to be more affected too. Christmas and the coming of spring seems to make everything less possible.

    For those of you who feel they possible can try and hold on at least until Christmas and then see how you feel - it's only a few weeks away.

    Try not to be too hard on yourselves and good luck.

     
  14. Ive had a smiliar experience to many of you guys and have already decided to leave. I'm at an awful school with no support inside my department. The only people who care are from the English dept.

    I've promised myself I will be out of there by Christmas, if not sooner and making that decision made me feel better instantly. I dont even want to stay until June, but whats the point anyway if I know I wont do my NQT year?

    Good luck everyone.
     
  15. I can really emmpathise with you guys. I'm finding this really hard too. Thinking about the 3rd, or even the 2nd, placement is filling me with dread right now. I knew the workload would be tough but didn't really consider factors such as teachers being unfriendly, etc.. My teacher is a very good teacher but I'm finding it hard to get on with her - like every complement will have a big BUT after it. She spent the first hour of the morning lecturing me on my abilities (when I had put my heart and soul into everything I had done). Later on when one of the kids told me that the literacy lesson I had just taught was the best lesson he had had all year I was surprised how I didn't feel any better. Usually this would have kept me smiling all week but I just felt numb. I'm missing my friends, boyfriend and family. I feel like I never see/speak to them.
    I don't want to quit as I feel like I will regret it but not really sure how I'm going to get through it.
     
  16. To the original poster:

    you said you don't feel that teaching is for you...

    why not? You didn't give a reason, just a feeling...

    that's fine, but I wonder if you can go a bit deeper?
     
  17. I think that sometimes you should persevere, but sometimes you just know something's not for you. I started a secondary PGCE and hated every minute when I started at the school, more than I've ever hated something. Yes, it didn't help that the teacher was very unfriendly and most of the other teachers. I'm a friendly and bubbly person, but just felt isolated and really down about going there every day. I quit at Christmas time, and felt instantly like a weight had been lifted. I went back home, and started on a TEFL course, and now I work abroad. I love my job, and I'm really glad I quit. I know this won't be the same situation for everyone, and it's good to stick things out, but I just didn't feel it was worth being THAT unhappy and THAT down. Training should be a challenge, but it shouldn't destroy your confidence. Trainee teachers should only be placed in schools that actually want them there!
     
  18. I quit a pgce last year near to the end of my first placement. I think it was a moment of weakness with other external problems affecting my perfomance.

    I now regret the decision and am applying for pgces again (i know its late in the year)

    does anyone know if this will have detrimental effects on actually getting a place and does anyone know if this will prevent me from receiving any funding again?

    mark
     
  19. Yes, I would think so.
    Any provider would be very wary of those who have quit a course before and would be loath to give a place if they think the same thing may happen again. Before offering a place, they would probably, with your permission, contact your former uni and find out the circumstances of your withdrawal. On your part you need to give very good reasons why this isn't going to happen again and that your commitment to teaching is serious and total.
    Find out on GTTR which courses still have vacancies, and phone up unis to ask if they are willing to consider you.
     
  20. As for funding, you should get the unpaid part of your bursary. And you should be able to apply to your LEA about grant and loans, as previous attempt at ITT doesn't automatically exclude you from reapplying. You need to speak to them about your personal circumstances.
     

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