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quickfire maths activities

Discussion in 'Primary' started by mbc11, Jan 24, 2012.

  1. I'm looking for some advice or tips on quickfire maths activities. Some of the children in my Y3/4 class have appalling maths knowledge i.e don't know no bonds to 10. 2, 5 10 times table etc. There is anything up 12 children who fall into this category. However at the other end there are 5-6 children who are very good all aiming for a 3a in the next half termly assessment. 3 20 minute sessions have been added to our timetable each day, session we are calling basic skills and one is for maths. However, I want to keep things fairly simple i.e. minimal writing and if at all possible all whiteboard type work. I could do with learning tables no. bonds etc but I', not sure how to cater for all of the children in my class in this way. I'm looking for something quick and punchy each day to get them involved but as I said that all can get involved in. Any ideas?
     
  2. I'm looking for some advice or tips on quickfire maths activities. Some of the children in my Y3/4 class have appalling maths knowledge i.e don't know no bonds to 10. 2, 5 10 times table etc. There is anything up 12 children who fall into this category. However at the other end there are 5-6 children who are very good all aiming for a 3a in the next half termly assessment. 3 20 minute sessions have been added to our timetable each day, session we are calling basic skills and one is for maths. However, I want to keep things fairly simple i.e. minimal writing and if at all possible all whiteboard type work. I could do with learning tables no. bonds etc but I', not sure how to cater for all of the children in my class in this way. I'm looking for something quick and punchy each day to get them involved but as I said that all can get involved in. Any ideas?
     
  3. chocolateworshipper

    chocolateworshipper Occasional commenter

    How about times table bingo? The children choose a times table they know, and write down 9 numbers in that times table. You then call out "5 times" - and they cross out 5 times whatever their times table is. First one to cross out all the numbers on their whiteboard wins. Hope this makes sense!
    For number bonds - maybe get all of them to write a number on their whiteboard from 1 to 9. Get one child to stand up and show the class their number - then invite children to stand up if they can help the first child make 10.
     
  4. misconception

    misconception New commenter

    IHave you ever used 'Gordon's' interactive teaching programmes?
    http://clg.coventry.gov.uk/info/64/primary_maths/49/gordon/2#navbox
    'Out of the hat' is a good one as it can be adapted to cater for different ability levels.
    'Odd-one-out' is also good and can be used to talk about different strategies that children are using.
    'Snow-flake sequences' can be found on the 'Number and number system' page and can cater for a range of abilities depending on the way it is used.
    There are others eg 'counting stick' which could be used both as quick fire testing and also as a teaching resource.
    'Teaching Children to calculate mentally' is a DfE publication that describes the expectations for each year group, the types of mental strategies that children should be taught and some teaching strategies. It also has some suggestions for activities which you might find useful. If you google the title then it comes up as a pdf at the top of the list (sorry but I dont seem to be able to post this link!)
    Another useful website is www.mathsticks.com which has some nice ideas. I particularly like 'collectors bingo' which could be differentiated by pairing children, giving children different numbers of cards etc. There is also a great video under 'multiplying' showing how a counting stick can be used to teach times tables. If you look under 'Number bonds' there is also instructions for making and using a 'flip-flop' for teaching number bonds.
    Hope this helps.
    Sarah

     
  5. All brilliant ideas, thank you both.
     
  6. pjmteach

    pjmteach New commenter

    my class love playing number tennis.. ...... can't remember where I got it from.... May even have invented it myself!!!
    We all get our mini tennis racquets ready. I bat a number to the class and they hit back the number that goes with it to make 10 or 12 or 20 etc. Hit back one more/ one less than my number.
    I bat my number to the class and they hit back half or double the number. The possibilities are endless. we often do it in a spare 5 minutes or as a quick warm up activity Great fun too and it can be as active as you like, standing up ..... or sit on the carpet and use your tiny one finger bat.
    Enjoy
     
  7. pjmteach

    pjmteach New commenter

    By mini tennis racquets I mean hand or even just two fingers! Difficult to explain in writing
    x
     
  8. jessifleur

    jessifleur New commenter

    my class love playing number tennis.. ......

    Totally trying that tomorrow, with a class that is 80% boys, I think we'll have great fun! Thanks :D
     
  9. number of the day: Display the number of the day (I go for a 2 digit number with my Y3s). Each child writes down as many facts as they can on a whiteboard about that number. Can be differentiated by outcome. So for example if the number of the day was 36, your low achieving children might notice that its an even number, that its made up of 3 tens and 6 units, that its 1 more than 35 etc. Higher achieving pupils could halve, double, list the factors, find the square root, use it in a division or multiplication number sentence. Some of mine will even write down if the number of the day has some other relevance to them, such as their birthday or their door number.

    Another one I like is to display a shop with items costing various different prices. Flash questions aimed at different kids that they can answer simultaneously on whiteboards, then discuss errors and misconceptions as a class. So a lower achiever may be asked to add the price of two items costing up to 10p, A middle achiever may be asked to add the cost of two items without bridging through £1, whereas higher acheivers could be asked to bridge through £s or asked to work out how much change they would get from £x after buying two different items.

    Hope thats useful/
     

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