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Questioning

Discussion in 'Secondary' started by Geordie05, Jan 15, 2012.

  1. Geordie05

    Geordie05 New commenter

    I am having increasing problems with verbal questioning of A Level students and I am frequently recieving "dont know" as an answer. This partly demonstrates their awareness that I am held entirely acountable for their attainment and so they need not concern themselves, as well as their concern only with writing answers that will gain marks. However, I also need to evaluate my questioning considerably. Any tips on how to avoid this increasingly irritating occurance?
     
  2. Geordie05

    Geordie05 New commenter

    I am having increasing problems with verbal questioning of A Level students and I am frequently recieving "dont know" as an answer. This partly demonstrates their awareness that I am held entirely acountable for their attainment and so they need not concern themselves, as well as their concern only with writing answers that will gain marks. However, I also need to evaluate my questioning considerably. Any tips on how to avoid this increasingly irritating occurance?
     
  3. Use "think-pair-share" so that students get a chance to discuss their answer before speaking in front of everyone. The discussion element of this also sets the expectation that everyone in the room will be thinking about and working on a response.
    Allow students to work as a group and answer with via a "spokes person", this can give confidence as one person isn't going out on a limb.You can create this by asking, "Tom, what does your table think?".
    If terms of feeding back to the class after an extended question or problem, go to the first group and prime them - say something like, "we'll be stopping in 3 minutes to go over this, will you be prepared to go first please". You can also visit groups, listen to their discussion and ask them to share specific point X during the class feedback.
    If the lack of talking is less to do with confidence and more to do with attitude (ie they're refusing to answer questions anyone could) I'd get to the point of privately warning them that they either actively participate in their own learning or you'll ask them to leave (followed by asking for a parent meeting).
     
  4. minnie me

    minnie me Star commenter

    Hi there.Have done a ton of stuff on Questioning ( vey practical and published ) . Provide an e mail add and I can send you some things to help.
     
  5. Best advice I heard for that particular scenario was to reply "well what would you have said if you did know?" I've tried it a few times and with relative success when you then start encouraging them to actually think. Had the odd one that replied "dont know!!" with a shocked look on his face.
    Minnie Me, would it be possible to post your work in resources?
    Regards
    D
     
  6. phlogiston

    phlogiston Star commenter

    Another strategy that can work is if a student replies "i don't know" is that when the answer to the question has been found you go back to the first student and make them ttell you the answer.
    P
     

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