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Question about euthanasia

Discussion in 'Personal' started by lurk_much, Nov 20, 2011.

  1. lurk_much

    lurk_much Occasional commenter

    three months maybe more
     
  2. Oh dear!
    I too won't take my pet to a vet as the fee for despatching a rat is usually more than the rat cost me in its lifetime.
    We do it at home with an airgun, quick and painless, the matties cease to exist in their own bed and the others know nothing (we take them out and play with them whilst the other one is put down.
    I suspect that when we need to despatch a chicken I will do it myself.
    But I also suspect that we are unusual in our choice!
     
  3. Vampyria

    Vampyria New commenter

    I find it incredible your contemplating PTS ( and I'm also quite shocked at your suggestion ) without knowing exactly what is wrong with your cat. When was the last time he saw a vet? It sounds as if he's suffering for some time now, so you please arrange a visit now. It could well be a very treatable illness. Even if it is renal failure ( only confirmed with a bloodtest) this is not a death sentence and diet and supplements can help enormously. Here is an excellent website.
    http://www.felinecrf.org/
    Even if the vet suggests PTS ( though hopefully not ) then please have this carried out humanely by the vet either at home or at the surgery. You owe this to your poor cat. And yes, you can be prosecuted for causing unnecessary suffering to an animal and this includes withholding veterinary treatment.
     
  4. kareneliot

    kareneliot Occasional commenter

    If you have any sleeping tablets you can OD the animal. No pain. It dies in its sleep.
     
  5. I'm with mandala in this thread. I believe our duty towards animals is to ensure they live free from pain and fear, I don't really think dignity is a consideration.
    So if you can bring about the euthanasia in a pain- and fear-free way, then whether you want to pay a vet £60 or whatever to do it, or just do it yourself, is a personal decision.
    For myself I would go to the vet because I don't have any means at my disposal for diy and also I would be worried I would muck it up and the animal may suffer, and also I think I would not be able to bring myself to do it because I've never done anything like that, and I think even just handling a pet's dead body would be a freaky and horrible experience that I would pay to avoid!
    But I don't buy the dignity thing at all. What do animals know of dignity? And I think it's a good question, OP.
     
  6. Vampyria

    Vampyria New commenter

    Depending on the skill of the operator it might be quick though I don't believe it's painless owing to the point of entry. One reason humane killers are used to euthanase or opposed to normal weapons.
     
  7. kareneliot

    kareneliot Occasional commenter

    Lots of stuff is OK for killing farm animalls.
    Firearms suitable for the on-farm killing of calves are as follows:
     shotguns (.410, 28, 20, 16 & 12 Bore - use number 4, 5 or 6 birdshot)
     captive-bolt equipment
     rifles (.22 rim-fire)
     humane killers (Greener ‘Bell’ Guns and ‘Safti-Killers’, general-purpose handguns
    and purpose-built pistols)

     
  8. I feel I have slipped into a parallel universe! Shot guns and airguns heavens above. Stroking your much loved pet while a vet gives a simple injection while you stroke and talk to your cat has to be more humane than administering a bullett to the brain! Then scrapping brains up of the kitchen floor. This is not right!! I once ,had a vet friend who kept a syringe at home to give badly injured mice brought in by the cat, a painfree end, but that is fine- he was an expert.
    I assume you are teachers and wonder how you describe the passing of your pets to your students! I talk about mine all the time but think it would seriously disturb them if they thought I had shot my pet[​IMG]
     
  9. Simply does not happen. No blood no brains. You are showing your ignorance of firearms.

    Having killed creatures with almost all of karenliot's list of
    weaponry I know what I am doing and the last thing that happens is a
    bloody mess.

    Yes I am a teacher. But as I never discuss any part of my home life with students why would I casually, apropos of nothing anounce I had shot my pet?
     
  10. Vampyria

    Vampyria New commenter

    Apart from dosing issues cats metabolise human medications very differently to us to I wouldn't advocate this course of action. Poor cat could suffer a severe reaction and suffer needlessly.
     
  11. Crowbob

    Crowbob Established commenter

    It seriously disturbs me that you would tell them about it...
     
  12. The majority of vets will come to your home to put a pet to sleep if it will be less distressing for the animal. My friend's mum called an emergency vet out at 2 am when their cat was suffering a sudden death (I believe it was something neurologically based) and the vet simply administered the injection while my friend, her parents and her 2 older brothers sat round him, stroking him and saying Goodbye.
     
  13. kareneliot

    kareneliot Occasional commenter

    There is an opinion that if you have 2 animals, you should let the survivor check out the deceased to know that it has died rather than disappeared, Seems a good idea but you would have to be really careful to ensure the vet did not mix them up.
     
  14. Vampyria

    Vampyria New commenter

    This was in response to Kareneliot's post regarding sleeping pills.
     
  15. It's interesting that you say that because our oldest cat had a twin brother that was knocked down by a car at the age of 15 months. He was wearing a collar with full ID and the person who found him rang up my mum in the middle of the night, waking her up. She went to collect him from the road where he was killed (it was only 2 roads away) and brought him back home until the next day when she got him cremated. She laid his body out on some newspaper and his twin brother came out and started licking the blood that was on his face and pawing at his face. My mum has always believed that he was trying to wake him up. When he established that his brother was dead, he went up to my mum's room and wouldn't leave her side all night, They were both devastated that night and they have been inseparable ever since. It definitely sounds like he was checking to know that he was dead.
     
  16. lurk_much

    lurk_much Occasional commenter

    For pobble v12 and kareneliot- let's widen the discussion slightly.
    So if it is basically okay if not legal to kill your unwell cat, rat, and inconvenient farm animals while people / the NHS aren't allowed to do the same for terminally ill kids and the elderly, do you believe it is justifiable?
    If not what difference is there?


     
  17. Crowbob

    Crowbob Established commenter

    They are not human.
     
  18. lurk_much

    lurk_much Occasional commenter

    A technicality.

     
  19. I don't think anthropomorphism comes into it. Pets such as cats are sentient beings. They also have protection in law. We do not have a perfect society. Animals are used in laboratories, for example, and cruelty undoubtedly exists. Regardless of this hypocrisy, at least domestic animals are afforded some protection. Thank goodness.
     
  20. Crowbob

    Crowbob Established commenter

    Maybe, but an important technicality.
     

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