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Qualified Typist, RSA Level III, Author British Standards Quality Documentation BS5750 Now ISO9001

Discussion in 'Tes Authors' Group' started by QAAWyrd_Tuition, May 1, 2017.

  1. QAAWyrd_Tuition

    QAAWyrd_Tuition New commenter

    Hi

    After many years in Finance and Industry as a clerk, Secretary, Exec Secretary and high level Quality Administrator in Telecoms I crossed over to Education taking a BSc Hons in Environment Studies followed by a PGCE.

    I do worry about the quality of the documentation shared on TES RESOURCES, this wasn't a worry when resources were shared in a spirit of fellowship but now with increasing fees per resource and licences the whole concept of non professionally made information in terms of presentation, (not content) becomes a potential problem.

    All resources non professionally word processed should carry a disclaimer from the 'author'. The world of displayed material to students preparing to enter the professional world should be checked, proofread and edited before being displayed on whiteboards in classrooms.

    [This comment/section/image has been removed for breaching our Community Guidelines/Terms and conditions]

    Also will Maths 'home-made-resource-authors' please be required to include worked answers on their Maths resources as there is a potential for disaster with well qualified parental input.

    [This comment/section/image has been removed for breaching our Community Guidelines/Terms and conditions]
     
  2. dunnocks

    dunnocks Star commenter

    That is just your opinion, personally I totally disagree. We are teachers. We make teaching resources, the priority is does it help learning? Full stop.

    Many many "presentations" are hand drawn on the spur of the moment in a lesson!
     
  3. mrajlong

    mrajlong Established commenter

    Is this a wind up?
     
    pigeonlearning and dunnocks like this.
  4. dunnocks

    dunnocks Star commenter

    There is a face book page, but the English is equally strange on there.
     
    mrajlong likes this.
  5. bonxie

    bonxie Senior commenter

    I'm pretty sure teachers on here know that the resources uploaded to TES, free or for sale, are produced by fellow teachers, not professional companies which employ proofreaders. How many teachers do you know employ professional proofreaders for the stuff they put up on their whiteboards? I've certainly never heard of any. That would be ludicrously expensive and a waste of money. If a pupil of mine spots an error I've made, I thank them, correct it and move on. We all make mistakes. Teach pupils to treat them as learning opportunities.
     
  6. Dodros

    Dodros Star commenter

    Before retiring from full-time secondary school teaching, I taught French, German and students with special educational needs. When my focus shifted from MFL to SEN, I became a big fan of the simple layouts and consistent typefaces of the literacy workbooks we used with students with learning difficulties. At the same time, I grew to loathe the busy, jazzed-up, higgledy-piggledy, multicoloured and confusing pages of the commercial French and German courses, which were replacing the old textbooks with their old-fashioned straightforward layouts, and which I was now expected to work with when teaching MFL to the same students with SEN. The irritation I felt was the necessary spur for me to start writing SEN-friendly MFL materials, whose pages were plainly and clearly structured, unlike the commercial course I was supposed to be using, but offering the same subject-matter content as the latter. My resources were very well received by both students and colleagues and I've uploaded many of them to TES Resources where they may still be downloaded for free. After I retired, the MFL department asked me to create a bank of similar materials to support learners with SEN who experienced difficulty when accessing the commercial coursebooks, which according to the publishers targeted the whole ability range.

    I certainly take your point that presentation, layout and typefaces do matter, particularly when creating resources for learners in difficulty. As a classroom practitioner, I was in a good position to observe which commercially produced materials worked and which didn't, and when I designed my own resources, I modelled my page layouts on what I considered to be the best practice not just in terms of aesthetics but also in terms of SEN-friendliness. My experience with today's "professionally designed" commercial MFL course materials was that the graphic designers employed to lay out those books actually raised barriers to the learning of the most vulnerable students when they should have been trying to lower them. That's why I frequently burned the midnight oil to devise resources that would compensate for the shortcomings of the professionals in the book publishing world.
     
    Last edited: May 3, 2017
    mathsmutt, bonxie and Krazikas like this.
  7. blowswind

    blowswind Occasional commenter

    Ooh I do like a bit of pomposity. Keep 'em comin...
     
  8. QAAWyrd_Tuition

    QAAWyrd_Tuition New commenter

    Hi

    Just a few thoughts.

    No it's not a wind up far from it, the Global TES (resources) plc are no longer the friendly resource sharing site, they once were, as they are now run by TES Global ( a publisher?) probably taking people's copyright from them or certainly using people's own creativity and then creating more expensive but proof read and edited bundles of their own that cost more money from teachers (do the School always pay for resources) The money for bundles often goes to the TES company and not to the person who authored/created the resource. This saves them time and money hiring professional textbook or resource writers and creates an income for TES Global.

    That's good for TES Global.

    The chaos of how the resources are made available is really silly, the document titles uploaded mostly don't have dates or versions included to link to either years or to specifications. Have you noticed how many say NEW to distinguish them from the Legacy Specifications - until New is not longer New. Furthermore those official resources on the multi billion £ global publisher Pearson Edexcel website rarely have document titles (when they are downloaded to show they are from Pearson Edexcel and neither do they have versions to show whether they are legacy or new specifications even the Spec doesn't have the Subject code but has the exam code instead. That's just outrageous for a huge publisher). Finding the correct resource in a couple of years time will be a really long search process. That's perhaps ok if you have an Administrator in the School searching for you, or have unlimited time and free broadband data time, but its really inefficient.

    I may sound pompous but big companies don't put up sharing sites for no reason. When resources are uploaded the copyright goes to TES Global. When we made documents in the business world it's different as they have the ability to register their copyright or patent. If teachers making resources could remember to add watermarks or have an identification that is embedded in the documents (other than a footer for a page number and document name - which is easy to add and can be removed just as easily) they may be able to keep the income from their creativity. Currently there is no way for teachers to keep being paid for their uploaded resources should the TES Global Ltd or any American teaching site for example, want to take and use those resources in bigger publications.

    Looking forward, over the next few years and looking towards the next specification changes (as soon as another government is in power or a new team wants to put their input into education) there will inevitably be another change of direction and then looking/searching for resources will probably cause even more data search time and hassle and even cause mistakes for teachers who find outdated information. It really is no joke at the moment, most of the YouTube resources for example are from the pre-2015 changes and AQA's Teach-it nearly breaks the device you are using if you are on a mobile device with the enormous number of search results. Just how are already overloaded teachers going to locate the right resource year of creation in the future when there is no indication in the title of the document of when that resource was made or to which specification it relates to.

    Some parents don't mind if resources don't look reasonably professional but some do mind and some are governors of the schools. They are keen to have a good reputation for excellence and quality and care about the kind of information their children bring home or students take home as they live in the world where they have to abide by documentation rules when working in private and public limited company's.

    Sure its ok for us not to follow all the conventions of internet website making for example, with properly set out pages and measured inserts etc, we might all be excused that one, but maybe its better to have your own small website such as wordpress and upload your resources and share the web-link - so you can share your information using the UK equivalent of a creative commons licence (possibly as you intended in the first place). The shop idea was cool early on but has changed as the Global Co took over TES.

    It is ok to write/type how you like and not have to worry about conventions on published material but if you would like to turn your creativity into a book to send to a publisher or impress- then there are people who can help.

    If students are supposed to be learning to be experts in English or any other subject - is there anything wrong with hoping that those people who who have spent hours learning Word Processing or even completing RSA Typewriting exams (and are still in the workplace) might have some relevance in the shared resource making world. Maybe some teachers would like their resources to be sent via voice or handwritten notes and have those resources typed for them and have a professional document as well as their own home-made style.

    Of course for pod-casts and video's - I may need to hire someone myself.
     
  9. QAAWyrd_Tuition

    QAAWyrd_Tuition New commenter

    English Literature:- Anyone else thought of a table with AO in columns for the students and rows for their input - adding in the mark scheme in rows as a template. English Language has the mark scheme going down the rows for the different questions similarly add the mark scheme information
    Why don't examining boards think sensibly?
     
  10. thinkypublishing

    thinkypublishing Occasional commenter

    This is not true. A publisher's rights to distribute materials is not the same as holding the copyright.

    For your wider argument it could also be argued that the traditional methods of education publishing are being challenged by the same changes that happened in the music and film industries.

    Some of my work has been published in catalogues for many years. I get a small return on those as the bulk of the costs goes to promotion and distribution etc. done by others.

    A digital marketplace such as TES enables a small publisher to make their work available immediately. Compare this to any changes made to resources sold by catalogues which can take over a year to be updated.

    I no longer approach publishers as I prefer to retain control of where and how I make my resources available.
     
  11. Dodros

    Dodros Star commenter

    Nothing at all wrong with offering your services, QAAWyrd_Tuition, but may I suggest that you demonstrate your WP and document design skills by uploading a resource or two (perhaps a before and after version of a teaching resource) as supporting evidence? I could only find a JPEG (screenshot?) of an Excel table for multiplication practice when I looked for your resource uploads. Perhaps I was looking in wrong place.
     
  12. mathsmutt

    mathsmutt Star commenter

    This is not my experience. May I ask what evidence you have for this?

    Are you aware of American sites stealing resources and breaching copyright ? Could you please "name and shame".


    Amazon Kindle https://kdp.amazon.com/ and CreateSpace https://www.createspace.com/ are useful.


    Publishing on TES gives access to a global market for a reasonable royalty.

    For reference of the terms & conditions, please see
    https://www.tes.com/content/additional-terms-tes-resources
    Part 2.1 Licences Granted to Other Users
    14. When you upload User-Uploaded Content to TES Resources to be shared for free, you will (if you are the owner of all intellectual property rights in and to that User-Uploaded Content) continue to own all intellectual property rights in and to that User-Uploaded Content. You are able to modify or remove your User-Uploaded Content as you wish.
    Part 3 Uploaders of Premium Content
    Part 3.1 Licensing and Warranties from You

    19. When you upload User-Uploaded Content to TES Resources to sell, you will, or those you act as agent for will, (if you/they are the owner of all intellectual property rights in and to the User-Uploaded Content) continue to own all intellectual property rights in and to that User-Uploaded Content. You are able to modify or remove your User-Uploaded Content as you wish


    20. To enable us to provide the Services and provide your User-Uploaded Content for sale, we require a licence to use the User-Uploaded Content that you upload to our Websites. You grant us and each of our Affiliates a non-exclusive, sublicensable, fully paid-up, royalty-bearing (in accordance with the clauses below), worldwide, perpetual and irrevocable (save as set out below) licence to use, reproduce, publish, sell, distribute and display your User-Uploaded Content (in whole or in part) and/or to incorporate it in other works in any form, media, or technology. You grant us all necessary rights to sell User-Uploaded Content under the Teaching Resource Licence and to make that licence effective.
     
    Dodros, Krazikas and mrajlong like this.

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