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Qualifications to teach overseas

Discussion in 'Teaching overseas' started by jwyatt84, Apr 4, 2012.

  1. HI. I am currently finishing a self funded GTP qualification and was informed that I could not use this qualification in some countries like Scotland and Australia. I was told by the course provider that if I complete some Masters modules upon completing the GTP then I would get the accreditation necessary to teach overseas. I have tried everywhere to determine exactly what modules I need to complete, but even the course provider can not help. Does anyone know if I just need to do these modules to demonstrate that I can complete assignments, and also does anyone know if there are specific modules that need to be completed? Any help would be greatly appreciated.
     
  2. HI. I am currently finishing a self funded GTP qualification and was informed that I could not use this qualification in some countries like Scotland and Australia. I was told by the course provider that if I complete some Masters modules upon completing the GTP then I would get the accreditation necessary to teach overseas. I have tried everywhere to determine exactly what modules I need to complete, but even the course provider can not help. Does anyone know if I just need to do these modules to demonstrate that I can complete assignments, and also does anyone know if there are specific modules that need to be completed? Any help would be greatly appreciated.
     
  3. If you look at the the job adverts on this site you will see that they all have different requirements. A lot of them do ask for PGCEs (this might be for visa reasons) whereas some just ask for you to be UK qualified. I can't imagine that individual masters modules would mean anything to overseas recruiters.
     
  4. the hippo

    the hippo Lead commenter Community helper

    This is a "How long is a piece of string?" question.
    Of course there are some "international" schools (those where they chew the fat, for example) where so-called "teachers" are not required to have a degree or any teaching qualifications. On the other hand, it will always be the case that the better schools can be more fussy. Therefore there will always be a huge gap between the minimum qualifications that some schools may perhaps be prepared to accept and the sort of qualifications and experience that the "top tier" schools will demand from prospective teachers.
    I have to agree with BigD83 and say that most overseas recruiters won't give a sausage about the individiual masters modules that you may or may not have completed. Goood references from your previous school are pretty much essential, but having completed this or that module is not much practical use when you are on break-time supervision, when you have a pile of end-of-term reports to write or when you have an angry parent to pacify.
     
  5. SMT dude

    SMT dude New commenter

    Agreed. But neither, to my knowledge, does instruction in any of these three vital skills, or in many others, feature on the PGCE course.
    The hippos who survive and flourish know exactly where the most refreshingly cool and titillatingly viscous mud is to be found, and exactly where the Russian female hippos foregather, thanks to their combination of experience and the innate intelligence to learn from it.
    Similarly the best teachers are born with gifts which they further sharpen by reflecting on their own experience and watching others in action. Plenty of fascinating things happen on a PGCE course, but the idea that you come in one end as raw material and emerge the other as a teacher is absurd.
    On the other hand, if candidates have done interesting modules in this, that or the other, and talk about them persuasively during an interview, that is another piece of evidence that they might be a worthwhile addition to our glittering array of professionals.
     
  6. Where is it that you actually want to teach? The restrictions that you speak of are (from what I've seen on this forum) more likely to apply to English-speaking countries. If that's what you're after, then you should be looking at the individual countries' requirements. Try a search using Country Name + GTP.
    If you're looking at (what I would consider) REALLY teaching overseas, i.e. international schools, then what has been advised above kicks in.
     
  7. MisterMaker

    MisterMaker Occasional commenter

    There are countries where there is a specific requirement for PGCE or BEds, but for other countries it comes down to the Head's experiences / belief system. My (admittedly limited) experience with GTP teachers means I'd avoid them where possible, but there is nothing to stop me hiring one (in Asia). As the regulars above note, some schools will be rather more open with their requirements.
    One young GTP chap seemed to have the necessary experience at interview, but when it came down to on the job performance, he was very weak. His report writing was abysmal, partially because of his poor NC knowledge. Yes, there are teachers with PGCEs and BEds with similar problems, but I believe they still study the NC on PGCE courses.
    If the candidate was in a shortage subject and had glowing references, perhaps I might to the risk, but I'll always prefer the other routes. The masters is almost an irrelevance.
     
  8. SMT dude

    SMT dude New commenter

    MM, when you are trying to be a sadistic brute, you come across as rather cuddly... but then, apparently perfectly straight-faced, you write something flesh-creepingly sinister.
    The more knowledge a colleague has of the NC (1), and the more s/he takes pride in that knowledge, the more likely s/he is to produce reports which are stillborn horrors, choked by jargon, starved of verbal nutrients, dead to any sense of the individuality of the child under review.
    The bafflement these 'reports' cause to nice young parents from Serbia or Sri Lanka is tragicomic. I say 'young' because the plague is especially rife in Key Stage One (2). Equally sad but funny is the imperialist indignation of the NC-moulded teacher who cannot understand why these lesser breeds won't learn the language.
    NC twaddle is bad enough in Nempnett Thrubwell, but exported to international schools it is acutely embarrassing.
    FOOTNOTES FOR FOREIGNERS:
    (1) NC refers to the National Curriculum for England Wales and Northern Ireland, as modified since its creation in 1988. Other countries also use the term 'national curriculum' but UK heads attuned to 'best practice' can spot these cheap imitations a mile away and treat them with the contempt they deserve. Your child's school report should contain constant and undeviating reference to the standards, levels and terminology recognised by this curriculum. If you find otherwise, take up the matter with your head teacher.
    (2) Both the Book of Genesis and Charles Darwin recognised the fact that young humans develop in five clearly differentiated 'Key Stages'. Unfortunately this is not yet recognised as a scientifc truth in all countries, a situation which hand-picked teams of UK-trained teachers are in the process of putting to rights worldwide. If you are in any doubt about which Key Stage your child is currently enjoying, seek expert help at your nearest British School. As a rough guide, if your child is learning to read and write a few words and likes sweets and teddy bears it is probably in Key Stage One, while if it is returning home in the small hours after experimenting with sex and drugs it has almost certainly reached Key Stage Four.
     
  9. [​IMG]
    The only quibble here is the use of the word 'knowledge'.
    I prefer 'infopollution'.
     
  10. I don't know about other countries, but in Australia the GTP is not a recognised teaching qualification. However, teaching registration is handled on a state-by-state basis. This means that you might get a different response depending on where in Australia you are! Some states might let you register on a provisional basis while you gain the necessary qualification. The problem is that they don't count GTP as a year of uni and the requirement here is that you have a 4yr Bachelors in education or minimum of 3yr subject degree plus one year postgraduate teaching qualification (acquired as part of a recognised university course). In terms of which masters modules you should get, I don't think it would matter - just that you have a masters degree in education should be acceptable.
     
  11. MisterMaker

    MisterMaker Occasional commenter

    But I was trying to be horrible in this one; I've got an anti-GTP bee in my bonnet. [​IMG]
     

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