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Pupils turning up to their lessons 'drugged' up...

Discussion in 'Behaviour' started by tulip_83, Sep 21, 2007.

  1. I'm an NQT in a challenging London school and have had a few of kids turned up totally off their faces on drugs. Any advice on how to deal with it? The issue is that I can't 'prove' it and I have to be very careful with the way I deal with things because some of these kids are very volatile.

    Any suggestions?! I guess I should add that they are not being particularly disruptive, it's just rather unnerving more than anything.
     
  2. I'm an NQT in a challenging London school and have had a few of kids turned up totally off their faces on drugs. Any advice on how to deal with it? The issue is that I can't 'prove' it and I have to be very careful with the way I deal with things because some of these kids are very volatile.

    Any suggestions?! I guess I should add that they are not being particularly disruptive, it's just rather unnerving more than anything.
     
  3. What aspects of their behaviour make you think they are high? I'm thinking you could tackle the behaviour that ensues, rather than accusing them (which you feel you can't prove).

    So if they're off-task, silly, talking too much etc you can get the On-Call member of staff (or whatever your policy is) and raise your concerns that way.

    In my school I would feel well backed-up by other staff and would voice my concerns to SMT, head of year etc and get them to visit the lesson.
     
  4. If you have concerns that a student is high on drugs you have a duty to report your concerns to the named member of staff in charge of pupil welfare.

    They will have recieved additional training on these things and know where to turn for support.
     
  5. Thia needs to be dealt with as and when it occurs. Treat each problem as a normal incident as cornel suggests but if they are completely unable to follow instructions you must follow up by reporting to SMT.
     
  6. garyconyers

    garyconyers New commenter

    What if SMT don't deal with the problems, ignore the fact that the pupils have no control over themselves and deflect the blame back onto the teacher?

    What would you do, MagicClass, if you were in the OP's position, called for SMT and were told, "If the lesson was more engaging this wouldn't happen", or, "try listening to the pupils instead of asking us to deal with it. You are not meeting their needsd" (despite obvious behaviour that shows they are on something)?

    This happens in schools.
     
  7. gameplayer

    gameplayer New commenter

    What would you do, MagicClass, if you were in the OP's position, called for SMT and were told, "If the lesson was more engaging this wouldn't happen", or, "try listening to the pupils instead of asking us to deal with it. You are not meeting their needsd"


    I've tried the 'Could you give a demonstration lesson with this class so that I can learn form your good practice' approach


    still waiting.......



    still waiting..........


    still waiting...........


    But no one's repeated the original ridiculous remark
     
  8. Gary
    "What if SMT don't deal with the problems, ignore the fact that the pupils have no control over themselves and deflect the blame back onto the teacher?

    That's irrelevant. You still have a duty of care to notify line managers if a pupil is high in school.

    "What would you do, MagicClass, if you were in the OP's position, called for SMT and were told, "If the lesson was more engaging this wouldn't happen", or, "try listening to the pupils instead of asking us to deal with it. You are not meeting their needsd" (despite obvious behaviour that shows they are on something)?"

    I would either leave and find a school that appreciated my efforts or I would make the results speak for themselves and make SMT eat their words by succeeding with the pupils.

    What else is there to do?
     
  9. garyconyers

    garyconyers New commenter

    I agree.

    However, I can't see how you could : "make the results speak for themselves and make SMT eat their words by succeeding with the pupils" if you were unable to even teach because of the pupils who destroyed any chance of this were too high on drugs to prevent their behaviour happening.

    How do you do this if you aren't able to teach (through no fault of anything you do) and you are stuck with pupils who are impossible to deal with because they are high on drugs?
    (SMT refuse to even acknowledge they are a problem).

    I can't see how this is possible if you understand the scenario I'm setting you.........
     
  10. garyconyers

    garyconyers New commenter

    Oh, and how do you leave and get a job in a different school with SMT writing references that mean no one will want to employ you?
    (Welcome to the real world of teaching for many teachers).
     
  11. "Oh, and how do you leave and get a job in a different school with SMT writing references that mean no one will want to employ you?
    (Welcome to the real world of teaching for many teachers)."

    What did you do Gary?
     
  12. tulip_83 - this is a child protection issue and your concerns need to be passed on to designated person. You will have reasons for suspicion and you don't have to prove anything - that's why we all have CP training, so we can recognise signs. Pass on exactly what you have noticed, using whatever concern sheet your school has. You may be wrong, but you may be right, in which case school has to try and do something.
    You can't deal with this personally in the classroom - if they are not disruptive get on with lessons as usual.
     
  13. Pupils would be instantly sent home and excluded for drinking or taking any kind of illegal drug at our school!! Parents should be informed of suspicion, and police can be called in to confirm

     
  14. garyconyers

    garyconyers New commenter

    Again, an ignored question from Magic (post 9).

    Not sure I understand post 10: I have said that I am no longer a teacher so I assume you know this. This has never happened to me but lots of people have explained they are in this situation on TES over the years. It happens a lot.

    I'd leave teaching totally if this did happen to me. What else could I do if I was stuck in a job I couldn't properly do with no other chance of escape?

    Are you going to actually answer a question and
    (i) say what you'd do in this situation
    (ii) answer the question posed in post 9 (similar question, really)
    (iii) at least comment on the question I've pose on the 'berries' thread, ie do you agree that if there are no consequences to actions, as there are for some pupils (teachers are blamed for poor behaviour of pupils), there is no reason to behave, and bad behaviour will continue?
     
  15. Alright Gary I'll put you out of your misery.

    It wasn't that I 'couldn't' answer your question - I was choosing not to.

    You've stated time and again that listening to pupils is a pointless exercise - even that it is the ruin of many schools. Yet when I stopped listening to you, stopped answering you, what did you do?

    You got all worked up. You didn't like it. You helped me make an important point - thank you.

    However, we also got our wires crossed...

    My point is that it's important to listen to young people as a matter of course. Ask any young person and one of the things they want adults to do is... LISTEN.

    They have views and concerns just like us - and just as you didn't like it when I didn't 'listen' to you, they don't like it when we don't listen to them.

    However, and I think this is where our wires got crossed, your point was that when a pupil has done something wrong - we shouldn't listen to them, we should impose a consequence.

    Yes, agreed. The point I was making was that, as part of our general interactions with pupils, we should try to create an atmosphere where they feel their views are valued.

    However that doesn't mean I'm saying we should listen to their excuses when they've done something wrong. And yes Gary, of course there should be consequences in place.

    Can we play nicely now?
     
  16. Sorry Gary - forgot to tack on my answer to your other question...

    "Oh, and how do you leave and get a job in a different school with SMT writing references that mean no one will want to employ you?
    (Welcome to the real world of teaching for many teachers)."

    I would go on supply and build up a new set of references. In many cases if you go on supply at a school and you fit in, if they really want you they will overlook a bad reference based on their first hand experience of your teaching. Besides, supply can be a great route into a full time post - gives you more chance to see what the school is really like and chance to spot an unsupoortive SMT before you sign the contract.
     
  17. Also apologies to op - seem to have hijacked the post somewhat
     
  18. garyconyers

    garyconyers New commenter

    I'll play nice when you do, Magic.

    I don't want to hijack this thread; see response on 'When you listen to the pupils too much it can be disastrous for a school' thread.

    BTW, I like your answer post 15. Spot on IMO. (I dislike the dishonesty in post 14. More straw men to knock down. Not very nice).

    ;o)
     
  19. It might be useful if 'magic' and 'gary' exchanged email addresses and had their arguments in private so that someone could actually try to address the original posts on these discussions...
     
  20. garyconyers

    garyconyers New commenter

    BASILIUS,
    see my later posts on the thread I set up, "When you listen to the pupils too much it can be disastrous for a school".
    The thread hijacking point was raised there by me.
     

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