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Pupils to train teachers in behaviour management?

Discussion in 'Behaviour' started by gusfisher, May 15, 2011.

  1. I am a year 8 form tutor and my form are particularly vocal about what they perceive to be gross miscarriages of justice (being told to stop talking when they have been chatting all lesson, getting a detention for not doing their homework when they have a perfectly good excuse involving a dog, or unmissable telly) and it started to worry me that pupil/teacher relationships were getting so bad. I went to talk to the HOY about it and she came up with the idea of putting together a CPD session for BTs / NQTs / RQTs to be delivered by the students about the dos and don'ts of behaviour managemet, as seen by the kids.
    I'm aware that the whole thing will have to be taken with a generous pinch of salt and we won't be asking those who turn up to take what the kids say as what they should do in future lessons because total chaos would ensue but we thought it would be an interesting insight into the workings of a 13 year old's mind, and a bit of extra responsibility for the students in my form.
    I am writing to ask if anyone out there has any ideas of how I should do this. Should I get the whole class involved, or just ask a few? How much input should I have, as the teacher? Would it be more meaningful if they planned the whole thing themselves? Any ideas for activities we could do?
    Any feedback would be greatly appreciated and I'll let you know how it goes

     
  2. If your planning on taking what they say with a generous pinch of salt then let the kids fly.
    Sometimes the results of these things are quite surprising with many children asking for tighter discipline.
    Do let us know how it goes!

     
  3. Let them plan it themselves. And BE SURE to let us know what they come up with. At the very least, it should start a barney on here...
     
  4. Tom_Bennett

    Tom_Bennett Occasional commenter

    To be honest, although I think this idea is coming from a beautiful place, I think you're courting disaster with this. If the kids are howling at the injustice of being told to stop talking over the teacher, who the Hell cares? They're children. What they have to tell us about behaviour management that we don't know can be written on the back of an invisible thimble, ie nothing at all.
    That's not to say I'm totally averse to courting their opinion. But this is a rocky road, and you can get their ideas in a much less obvious, less theatrical way- have a class discussion, or something. But to empower them to even deliver an INSET to staff is a dreadful inversion of the correct order of authority between children and adults. If you think you're experiencing behaviour problems from them now, then wait until you start to feed the idea that they have the right to even tell us what we need to do. Trust me; this way madness lies.
    And consider the feelings of your colleagues: teachers are beleaguered enough, and already experience high levels of dis-empowerment (notice that although we have Student Voice, we don't actually have a meaningful mechanism for teacher voice. The campaign starts here!) Some of your colleagues will be aghast at this, and won't see the funny side. Others might appreciate that it's just another piece of student voice jiggery pokery. But teachers have enough on their plate, without sitting through what is essentially a school show with little or no educational value. I mean seriously, what are they going to tell you that a professional doesn't already know?
    If they already think that perfectly sensible rules by which classrooms operate efficiently (ie no one shouts out, one at a time, teacher speaks/ everyone listens, etc) are unjust, then they sound like they need less of a voice, not more, and maybe a bit more teaching in self restraint. Adults are in charge of them, because we know more about things; because we're more responsible, and because we've been given the duty of leading them into adulthood. The day that turns around is a very odd one indeed.
    Can you tell I'm against it? :)That said, if you're proceeding anyway, good luck. Somehow.
    http://behaviourguru.blogspot.com/
     
  5. RaymondSoltysek

    RaymondSoltysek New commenter

    I agree with Tom that this is potentially a very difficult proposal that could backfire.
    I quite like the idea of joint training, where the pupils see behaviour management form the teacher's point of view: that would build their awareness of what teaching and learning is, and how behaviour management can support it. And, yes, their opinions are worth listening to - though only after they've had training too, and in a carefully managed setting.
    However, pupils "training" teachers without that pedagogical background seems an odd concept. In-service trainers carefully match course provision to the needs of the audience - would pupils be able to do this for the teachers?
     
  6. PaulDG

    PaulDG Occasional commenter

    Historians tell me that one of the most inflamatory things Louis XIV did was to ask the people of France to list their grievances. Apparently the list was a lot longer (and more expensive to resolve) than nobility was expecting and so it was ignored.
    This offence after raising expectations that something might actually change led to unfortunate consequences for Louis, his wife and rather a lot of people actually..
     
  7. Yet I have the impression it's done to teachers... quite a bit.
     
  8. Students on interview panels for teachers, and now this?



    I can't imagine that the students will take this task very seriously, and I can imagine you ironically having a hard time managing their behaviour while they are planning the session out. Really, a student who thinks it's terribly unfair of you to ask them to be quiet is not the right student to ask to do this sort of thing.



    The Edudicator
     
  9. The exercise might clarify some of the issues involved, though; I'd expect the results to be so ludicrous that no-one could take them seriously. It might make those advocates of something they call 'student voice' think the implications out a bit better.
     
  10. That would be lovely if it did, and I've actually gone ahead with other student voice type activities myself hoping that that's what would happen. What actually happened was management said I hadn't done the task right and it was my fault for not doing it properly that it wasn't a useful exercise.

     
  11. Haha! You do win!



    The prevailing attitude was that they wanted to be respected as adults. What they meant by that was all of those things you've described. What SMT interpreted it as was that I was undermining them.

     
  12. The closest I have seen to this sort of thing working was a teacher who interviewed students asking "what makes a good lesson" and "what makes a good teacher" as a sort of Vox Pops video, they interviewed a range of students, including some very sensible ones, and some much less so.
    The product was edited down to a 3 minute video shown at the beginning of an INSET. This meant that the good ideas got heard, but the troublemakers didn't get to waste time on their own agenda.
     
  13. Tom_Bennett

    Tom_Bennett Occasional commenter

    Well said sir!
    http://behaviourguru.blogspot.com/

     
  14. 'no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no
    and <u>NO</u>! '
    U sure about that?

     
  15. emphatically sure
     

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