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Pupil Voice - What is your view?

Discussion in 'Primary' started by caryssoper, Feb 22, 2011.

  1. I'm all for going with the childs interest but feel that there is a lot of pressure to implement it on a bigger scale. With it happening already happening from day to day in the classroom. What is your view on learner voice and what do you find are the most effective ways of implementing it on a daily basis?
     
  2. I'm all for going with the childs interest but feel that there is a lot of pressure to implement it on a bigger scale. With it happening already happening from day to day in the classroom. What is your view on learner voice and what do you find are the most effective ways of implementing it on a daily basis?
     
  3. Surely children need to have been taught something before they can have a say in what they want to be taught next ?

     
  4. PV is not just about having a say in what they are taught.
    In my school, PV is about holding weekly class councils and dealing with issues and suggestions, it can be about bullying. requesting more equippment on the yard, interviewing, fund raising and much, much more.
    Our PV is very pro-active and when intensely interviewed reccently, by Ofsted, came out 'good'.
     
  5. Seems to be a new phrase to describe what many teachers, or rather classrooms, did back decades ago. Homeworks and targets were personalised, classroom displays designed and put up by pupils, themes/topics planned in conjunction with the teacher, as well as council type content..
     
  6. I wish that was the case. Most children are perfectly capable of managing their own learning, and teachers of facilitating it, if the right strategies are put in place from the moment the child starts school. (I went to a 'progressive' and successful primary in the 1960s).
    But in my children's experience, what PV means is that the child is asked for their view on whatever it is, a box ticked, and the school or teacher or LA or education system carries on regardless.
    It's well-nigh impossible to truly 'hear' the pupil's voice with regard to learning AND to meet arbitrarily imposed performance targets. Children have a tendency to go off at fascinating and often useful tangents with their learning that wouldn't meet goverment criteria.
     
  7. Pre NC, along with a number of phrases describing the class or classroom, eg "community of enquiry", (P4C Lippman) was "our class", a phrase I used a lot.
    "Our class" got taken away 90s, not their class, not my class, more the Secretary of State for Education's class as education became command and control from the top down.
     
  8. Quite. Both my children experienced their school classes as largely competitive environments and their experiences of group work, especially when teachers select the groups, are almost entirely negative - lots of squabbling, vying for position or letting one or two people do all the work.
    The idea that a school class could develop a strong, positive shared identity through working separately on a project and then pooling findings, or by taking responsibility for certain roles in the school, is alien to them. I used to love the feeling of real community in 'our class' as a pupil and as a teacher.


     

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