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Pupil Terrified of Brother & Horror Films

Discussion in 'Primary' started by adonai, Feb 18, 2012.

  1. Our school recently went on a school trip. One of our Year 5 pupils was terrified to shower with the bathroom door closed. When I asked him why, he emerged from the bathroom in tears and physically shaking. He looked terrified.
    The pupil has often spoken about his brother "forcing" him to watch scary films and that his brother taunts him into believing that the evil ideas he views are true and are out to get him. His brother also threatens him with curses and agression (such as chasing him with a real hammer). All of this supposedly happens when his mum or dad are not present and have left them to look after their 2 year old sister. (This is in a European country at an international school and so UK law does not apply).
    The Year 5 pupil says that his parents don't take his bullying seriously enough, and don't know how terrified he has become.
    I can believe that the extent to which the child expressed his horror is not exaggereated for three reasons:
    Firstly, he was extremely upset and has consistently mentioned the taunting and bullying of his brother over a one year period. (Perhaps teachers, until now, have also not taken his behaviour seriously).
    Secondly, he says that he is addicted to watching horror films and scary things on the internet now and finds it hard to stop because of his curiosity (and probably because of a dopamine rush of being scared "from a distance" before it develops into a belief of reality and a more severe fear).
    Thirdly, and most importantly, the school knows the older Year 7 brother. I was his teacher when he was in Year 6, but now he attends a middle school. He was a very manipulative character who seemed to have an obsession with horror films and beliefs of spirits, as well as a morbid interest in blood and other dark subjects.
    The school has already decided to sit down with the pupil's parents to express our deep concern.
    By coincidence, the older brother is also coming to visit the school next week. Should we arrange for him to be present in a meeting with his parents? I know him very well. Should I speak with his older brother one on one? What would you say to him?

     
  2. Our school recently went on a school trip. One of our Year 5 pupils was terrified to shower with the bathroom door closed. When I asked him why, he emerged from the bathroom in tears and physically shaking. He looked terrified.
    The pupil has often spoken about his brother "forcing" him to watch scary films and that his brother taunts him into believing that the evil ideas he views are true and are out to get him. His brother also threatens him with curses and agression (such as chasing him with a real hammer). All of this supposedly happens when his mum or dad are not present and have left them to look after their 2 year old sister. (This is in a European country at an international school and so UK law does not apply).
    The Year 5 pupil says that his parents don't take his bullying seriously enough, and don't know how terrified he has become.
    I can believe that the extent to which the child expressed his horror is not exaggereated for three reasons:
    Firstly, he was extremely upset and has consistently mentioned the taunting and bullying of his brother over a one year period. (Perhaps teachers, until now, have also not taken his behaviour seriously).
    Secondly, he says that he is addicted to watching horror films and scary things on the internet now and finds it hard to stop because of his curiosity (and probably because of a dopamine rush of being scared "from a distance" before it develops into a belief of reality and a more severe fear).
    Thirdly, and most importantly, the school knows the older Year 7 brother. I was his teacher when he was in Year 6, but now he attends a middle school. He was a very manipulative character who seemed to have an obsession with horror films and beliefs of spirits, as well as a morbid interest in blood and other dark subjects.
    The school has already decided to sit down with the pupil's parents to express our deep concern.
    By coincidence, the older brother is also coming to visit the school next week. Should we arrange for him to be present in a meeting with his parents? I know him very well. Should I speak with his older brother one on one? What would you say to him?

     
  3. ROSIEGIRL

    ROSIEGIRL Senior commenter

    Parents first.
     
  4. McCahey

    McCahey New commenter

    Poor kid is terrified! As a mum and a teacher, something needs to be done. This is a child protection issue. I obviously don't know the rules in your school / country. Clearly, the first step has been taken if you are to speak to the parents as the 'school'. Good luck. Sounds awful. ( also v concerned about the welfare of the 2 year old sister).
     

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