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Pupil Noise- too much!

Discussion in 'Behaviour' started by leicester girl, Mar 1, 2011.

  1. My Year 4 class are always noisy. They come into the classroom and continue to talk during the morning work set. Even after I have reminded them, they continue to talk! During the register I have stated I expect silence- this is met by the majority but on few occasions has this actually happened for the whole class.
    During lesson time, my class talk loudly. I have said quiet partner voices are to be used if they need to and have used 'silent working' as a consequence.
    I have tried the 'hand in the air', shakers and golden time rewards but these do not seem to have the effect I am looking for.
    What can I do to get my class to be quiet when I have stated it and during independent activity time?
    I'm really stuck!
     
  2. My Year 4 class are always noisy. They come into the classroom and continue to talk during the morning work set. Even after I have reminded them, they continue to talk! During the register I have stated I expect silence- this is met by the majority but on few occasions has this actually happened for the whole class.
    During lesson time, my class talk loudly. I have said quiet partner voices are to be used if they need to and have used 'silent working' as a consequence.
    I have tried the 'hand in the air', shakers and golden time rewards but these do not seem to have the effect I am looking for.
    What can I do to get my class to be quiet when I have stated it and during independent activity time?
    I'm really stuck!
     
  3. YesMrBronson

    YesMrBronson New commenter

    Have you told them off or punished any of them?
    If you don't have consequences for pupils who refuse to be quiet then the situation is unlikely to improve. I read that you "have used 'silent working' as a consequence" but this isn't really a punishment; rather it's an extension of the expectations you already have.
     
  4. Zadok1

    Zadok1 New commenter

    I teach much older kids but you could try waiting for silence and explain that you will be adding the time you wait on to the end of the lesson... during their break time! I've used that for years and usually works. In time all you have to do is stand still at the front of the room and look at your watch!
    Try explaining that you expect them to work for a set period in silence because you want to make sure that all the work is their own work but that if they manage the time in silence they can have 2 mins talk time at the end.

    Alternatively try reminding them that partner voices means that you shouldn't be able to hear exactly what they're saying... so if you can repeat the content of the conversation they are too loud. You then have choices... if you hear someone saying something clearly enough to repeat it... then do just that... repeat it to the class. Obviously this works best if they are being silly and might just be a little shame faced; others might just be quiet because they fear the same happening to them. The other option is to make it clear that if you can hear what they are saying they will have to do a task during their break time... and the tasks can increase in 'meanness'. The first caught might have to straighten all the desks, the next might have to tidy the chairs, the next picks up all the litter on the floor etc. The thing is if you can carry this off with your tongue firmly in your cheek as you do it the majority might just see that you're not really being nasty but that you have a reasonable expectation of them to work well... and that chatting is not a terrible offence so does not deserve a terrible consequence... just one that is as irritating as their behaviour in the first place. By the way I don't suggest you give up all your break time... 5 mins is enough to cover it I think.

    Hope that helps
     
  5. I thought you said you were strict? Chatting isn't working so is a terrible offence in my view.
    I would start small here and gradually increase your expectations as time moves on. Get them working for five minutes in silence at the start of a task first - really focus on this period and punish any students who refuse to do it. If they successfully manage this you can increase the time or add in more specific rules about chatting. Small steps.
     
  6. Zadok1

    Zadok1 New commenter

    In the greater scheme of things chatting is relatively minor compared to throwing objects, swearing, kicking people, plagiarism, intimidation and bullying etc... I don't tolerate chatting in class if I've asked them not to because it is infectious... one starts and the next minute you have a racket and can't hear yourself think. If I did think it was okay to chat I wouldn't have come up with strategies to combat it... but as I say it's not done with malice so doesn't need to be 'punished' but rather actively discouraged.
     
  7. Tom_Bennett

    Tom_Bennett Occasional commenter

    The strategies you're using are just part of the recipe. I recommend that you start to show them that you mean what you say, and sometimes that means you have to get serious with them. Think about how it seems from their point of view: you tell them not to chat; they chat; you tell them not to chat again. There's nothing in that (oversimplified of course) circle that would motivate them to do anything else other than what they already do. You're relying on their good will to 'eventually come around,' but that won't happen with many children, who are, let's be honest, in a relatively egocentric phase of their lives.
    So set your behaviour expectations out clearly: tell them that from now on, anyone who chats when they're supposed to be silent, will be kept behind/ lose golden time etc. Make loud praise to those who are behaving, to emphasise the kind of behaviour you are looking for. But don't wait for them to do as you say out of the goodness of their hearts.
    Good luck
    http://behaviourguru.blogspot.com/
     

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