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protecting your state pension during and after capability

Discussion in 'Workplace dilemmas' started by Mrsmumbles, Nov 30, 2015.

  1. Mrsmumbles

    Mrsmumbles Star commenter

    Dear all
    Just stumbled across a little nugget that I want to pass on. When the sods that be chuck us out by forcing us to resign to avoid capability, the salary takes a kicking, the teachers' pension stalls, it's generally very unpleasant. Made even more so by looking at boggle-eyes Morgan on the daytime news shows you can now watch! As you all know, the age at which we can retire to qualify for state pension is rising, so every month of national insurance we pay in, whether it be through salary or benefits paying it for us...well it all counts. Especially as, when on supply, we cannot contribute to our other pension. I cannot claim benefits due to a mortgaged home and waged partner. Many teachers facing the loss of their job will be in a similar plight. However, I AM entitled to claim back the national insurance payments on the months I wasn't teaching, as I've obviously paid in for the bulk of a teaching year, then left suddenly. You can request through the DFEE that National Insurance pay them on your behalf. Nobody else CAN pay them on your behalf, so just as well really. You telephone them, they interview you briefly on the phone, they then post out a longish form, then you fill it in. This is especially useful for teachers whose health has broken down and are looking at several months out of work, yet cannot claim benefits. I don't think you get this if you DO qualify for benefits, I was told it's an either/or, which is depressing. At least, if you do this, your state pension is being paid into while you look for work. If you're facing this position, ask the department for work and pensions to post you out a form. The DFEE will then assess you...you almost certainly WILL qualify, and they should then pay the missing months, to make it up to the full tax year of national insurance contributions. There's a reason why they're not advertising this much! Otherwise, all these teachers who worked last April to this year and have to leave suddenly...will not get a full state pensionable year.
     
    Last edited: Nov 30, 2015
    jomaimai, HelenREMfan and cissy3 like this.
  2. cissy3

    cissy3 Star commenter

    Thank you @Mrsmumbles Extremely helpful info.

    I took early retirement because I was sick of the s hit flying my way It's a tiny pension, but enough to stop me claiming any benefits.

    I had often wondered about NI but have been too lethargic to do anything about it. (Grrr about the pension age rising so drastically too!)
     
  3. Mrsmumbles

    Mrsmumbles Star commenter

    Anything to help...hopefully you can get the message out there! It's appalling what's happening to teachers these days. The whole capability initiative is a bid to get rid of expensive staff and steal their pensions off them, as the employers will replace us with younger staff with lower employer contributions and lower overall salary costs. So thanks, DFEE. If we all applied for our pension back pay for missed NI contributions, this government would realise that but will have to pay back in a different way. Until they close this loophole too. So come in everyone...get those claims in!
     
  4. TheoGriff

    TheoGriff Star commenter

    .

    DFEE?


    .
     
  5. cissy3

    cissy3 Star commenter

    Department for Education and Employment?

    It changes so often. It was DES when I started :p
     
  6. TheoGriff

    TheoGriff Star commenter

    .

    :D

    It has had 7 names in the time I have been teaching... but Dfee was so long ago I couldn't believe Mrs M meant that.

    Best wishes

    .
     
    Mrsmumbles and cissy3 like this.
  7. Rott Weiler

    Rott Weiler Star commenter Forum guide

    .
    .
    For aficionados of trivia....

    Ministry of Education (MoE), 1944–1964

    Department of Education and Science (DES), 1964–1992

    Department for Education (DfE), 1992–1995

    Department for Education and Employment (DfEE), 1995–2001

    Department for Education and Skills (DfES), 2001–2007

    Department for Children, Schools and Families (DCSF), 2007–2010​

    Department for Education (DfE), 2010 to date


    7 Names? I'd never have guessed you'd been teaching since 1964 Theo ;)

    .
    .
     
  8. TheoGriff

    TheoGriff Star commenter

    .

    Yep - started PT in a small school while I was at University.

    There was no MacDonald's to work in.

    ;)

    Best wishes

    .
     
  9. Mrsmumbles

    Mrsmumbles Star commenter

    I am that old. Twill always be DFEE to me! DFES now, I guess, sorry!
     
  10. Mrsmumbles

    Mrsmumbles Star commenter

     
  11. jco

    jco New commenter

    .[/QUOTE]
    I too am a teacher who left (hounded out due to illheath and high salary) and now find myself aged 58 and not earning. I have 30 years of teachers pensionable service but less than the the full enhanced state pension (due at 66). I am worried about NI contributions. The difference is I left teaching in Aug 2014 and worked in another job for a year (one year fixed contract). So can I arrange for NI contributions to continue to be paid if I can prove that I left because of my ill health? Would the DFEE really do this?
     
  12. itgeek

    itgeek New commenter

    Check out https://www.gov.uk/state-pension/eligibility or contact the DWP and ask them for a statement showing NI contributions. I thought (although I may well be wrong and ham happy to be corrected) that contracting out was from SERPS or the top up state pension, anyone in teaching for 30 years should have paid 30 years of class 1 NI contributions, although I think the qualification period is to rise to 35 years shortly. It was 40 years at one stage it depends on your age I think, but I would check with the DWP.
     
    Mrsmumbles likes this.
  13. frustum

    frustum Star commenter

    Definitely ask for your NI contribution statement. I was surprised to discover that I also had credits for the years I was 16 and 17 - apparently that's standard (or was in the late 80s). You may well be closer than you think to the 35 years.

    https://www.gov.uk/national-insurance-credits/eligibility does indicate that you can have NI credits if you are unemployed and seeking work but not on benefits. Likewise if you're ill/disabled but not claiming benefits.
     
  14. Mrsmumbles

    Mrsmumbles Star commenter

    I too am a teacher who left (hounded out due to illheath and high salary) and now find myself aged 58 and not earning. I have 30 years of teachers pensionable service but less than the the full enhanced state pension (due at 66). I am worried about NI contributions. The difference is I left teaching in Aug 2014 and worked in another job for a year (one year fixed contract). So can I arrange for NI contributions to continue to be paid if I can prove that I left because of my ill health? Would the DFEE really do this?[/QUOTE]
    I'm not sure about that. If after you left, you did not work, and also didn't qualify for benefits, then yes I think they would have paid. I think there might still be a way, if you call them, that they can accept bought back years? Call them weekdays between 1 and 3 or 10 am after the first rush, they seem easier to reach then. May take a few calls on hold and assorted numbers before you get through. Good luck
     
  15. Mrsmumbles

    Mrsmumbles Star commenter

    Yes, also true...I worked one whole summer and part time the rest if the year at uni and got two years that way.
     

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