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Pros and cons of supply teaching

Discussion in 'Supply teaching' started by silkywave, Nov 10, 2017.

  1. silkywave

    silkywave Occasional commenter

    I retired from teaching and took my teacher pension. It is not enough to live on as I joined teaching later. I need to work to top up my pension until I can claim state pension.

    Like many, I was so completly exhausted and drained both physically and mentally when I left that I’ve needed some time to start to recover.

    So I’m considering the pros and cons of returning to teaching?

    What are the expenses I will need to consider/be expected to pay before I can start? I’ve not been into school for 18 months. I guess I’m reconsidering it because it’s what I know. I don’t want to sit on a till and there is very little else available where I live. Or is there something else I could train for?
     
    pepper5 likes this.
  2. historygrump

    historygrump Established commenter Forum guide

    Usually the agency pays for the CRB/DBS and claims back when you work, otherwise the expenses are pens,pencils and paper just in case the kids or the classroom as neither. You will not make a fortune from supply teaching and anyone expecting to earn £15000 plus are very naive to say the least.

    Work wise it as quiet times and peak times, traditionally from now to Easter, but it seems less busier this year, you will be asked to go into schools for around £65 to £70 (CS rates) at times, on the grounds that is all the school is willing to pay for. You will that school teachers will at times look down on, as if you have an IQ of a newt and students will try to act up or say things like Miss X or Mr X lets us to this or listen to music.

    The greatest bonus is that you are flexible in how you work, i.e. if you don't feel like working you can make yourself unavailable for work for that day or a few days, you do not have to go back to the schools you dislike and you do not have the paperwork, marking and school politics to deal with.

    It is also hard to build the relationships a permanent teacher would have with the classes, but if you go to a school enough times, you do develop a connection, in that the kids get use to you, but you cannot see the academic progression over a year like the permanent class teacher. This means that you have to judge a students or class personalities within 30 seconds of meeting them to seek and apply a management style that will hopefully work
     
  3. blazer

    blazer Star commenter

    You don't need to buy stationary. You acquire this as you go along!;)

    You need a coffee mug with a lid and some tea bags, coffee sachets and a bottle to put a bit of milk in. Add your sandwiches and you are good to go. If you do longer term placements then the school should have the resources you need.
     
  4. JohnJCazorla

    JohnJCazorla Established commenter

    I prefer to get my own portable DBS, think I paid £48 for it and just over a tenner to renew annually (I could be very wrong here so check with agencies). Initially I wanted my own DBS to arrange supply work direct with schools but that hasn't happened.

    Suggest you still get it and sign up with about 5 agencies. My experience is that they are all useless but one always seems to come through at any given time.

    You also have the implied question is it worth it? That's nearly impossible to find out without trying it. I'm doing very well as Maths/Science in West Yorks (£195 a day, medium/long-term). However I seem to have priced myself out of day-to-day as £140 a day is too much for an agency to ring me. Of course I don't know when this gravy train will stop running but stop it will.

    If not working means not going to the Caribbean in 2018 then you could find supply very enjoyable. It's only a bind when you realise you have to take everything going and still the phone doesn't ring.
     
    silkywave likes this.
  5. blazer

    blazer Star commenter

    I am going to the Caribbean in February and although I already had the cash for it the money I shall earn this half term means it can stay in the bank! Result.
     
    silkywave and JohnJCazorla like this.
  6. JohnJCazorla

    JohnJCazorla Established commenter

    What???:eek:
    You will have extra cash and you're going to a place with palm trees, beachside bars and cocktails and YOU'RE LEAVING THE MONEY IN THE BANK!!!
     
    les25paul and pepper5 like this.
  7. pepper5

    pepper5 Star commenter

    The biggest negative thing about supply is the unpredictability of the work which is of course the nature of the work. Not knowing from week to week what work you will be getting.
    Working through agencies that have little regard for you other than a means to make money for their businesses is another negative aspect.

    The pros for me are:

    Each day is different. You never know what you are teaching if you are doing day to day supply and you never know exactly where you are going. I like the surprise element.

    Being able to never have to go back to a school if you don't like it. You are not trapped at any particular place.

    If you have a tough day, you can take the next day off to rest if you need to.

    Getting paid weekly which is extremely helpful.

    Learning new things.

    Meeting new people.
     
  8. peakster

    peakster Star commenter

    The weekly pay is very convenient - I would get confirmation of my earnings for the week via a text message on Wednesday evening at about 7 pm. I was usually tutoring that evening so had my phone off. As soon as I cam out of my tutee's house I would turn on my phone and wait for the "ping".
     
    pepper5 and silkywave like this.
  9. les25paul

    les25paul Star commenter

    I hope its a better bank then the one he got it from.:D At least there will be no extradition from this bolt hole, sorry I mean holiday resort.

    PS Can I have my strippy jumper and mask back now please @blazer . ;)


    upload_2017-11-12_21-8-41.jpeg
     
  10. blazer

    blazer Star commenter

    LOL!
    Mrs B can find lots of creative ways to spend the money I earn on Supply. The latest one is paying the £5K moving expenses of blazer major and his family!:eek: Her reasoning is that they will get it when we are dead anyway :rolleyes:
     
    pepper5 likes this.
  11. silkywave

    silkywave Occasional commenter

    Thank you for taking the time to reply. I can't believe I will have to get work through an agency. It goes against the grain to pay a middle man.
    I did contact several schools in the area I have moved to and heard nothing back.
    Teaching is a love/hate thing for me. That is why I’m weighing up the pros n cons!

    .
     
    pepper5 likes this.
  12. ITrunaway

    ITrunaway New commenter

    I am thinking of doing exactly that - day to day supply topped up with tutoring. It sounds like the only way to make supply teaching viable as an income.
     
    pepper5 likes this.
  13. peakster

    peakster Star commenter

    I did pretty well doing that for a whole year on supply.

    When I get out of full time teaching again I'll go back to it.
     

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