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Profile point for piano playing??

Discussion in 'Early Years' started by NellyFUF, Jan 16, 2011.

  1. NellyFUF

    NellyFUF Senior commenter

    Piano playing has to be point 9 in Creative - has to be
    there is part of Creative that is about developing a preferred means of self expression - In learning and development there is anyway - and it probably has an impact on physical development too.
    piano playing
    wow
     
  2. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    You would think so wouldn't you but I'm afraid not
    CD8
    Expresses and communicates
    ideas, thoughts and feelings
    using a range of materials,
    suitable tools, imaginative and
    role play, movement, designing
    and making, and a variety of
    songs and musical instruments

    CD9
    Expresses feelings and
    preferences in response to
    artwork, drama and music and
    makes some comparisons and
    links between different pieces
    Responds to own work and that
    of others when exploring and
    communicating ideas, feelings
    and preferences through art,
    music, dance, role play and
    imaginative play

    it shows the limitations of the profile


     
  3. Leapyearbaby64

    Leapyearbaby64 New commenter

    Presumably the child is having lessons? I learnt to play the piano very young, and speaking from my own point of view (as someone who turned out not to be particularly musical) it can be rote-learning rather than creative expression. This is quite an interesting one that we've had discussions about in our school ref gifted and talented. Some children have the advantage of having lots of input from outside school. Music lessons and sports coaching are examples. Does this additional input make them intrinsically talented at something?
     
  4. Doitforfree

    Doitforfree Senior commenter

    That's an interesting point. I get cross when people say how 'talented' my children are because they can play musical instruments. Two of them are not particularly talented but have worked hard and achieved success, which as far as I'm concerned is a lot more noteworthy than talent.
     
  5. inky

    inky Lead commenter

    Success? That's the thing with playing an instrument: talent + application = success. Of course, there used also to be the success of being able to sit down at the piano at Christmas and massacre a tune that people enjoyed singing to. Nobody does that anymore. Besides, most untalented children [in my experience] give up pretty soon unless they have monster parents.
    With musical talent, working hard is all very well but, without talent,I don't see how it can be more noteworthy than talent.
    As for children not necessarily being eligible for 'scoring' a point just because they are known to be learning an sintrument, I agree. But you'e got to remember that it's a shame when talented children don't get the chance to have good quality instrumental lessons, one-to-one, with a decent teacher.
     
  6. The creative development points really irritate me every year! I hate the one (and I apologise for not using the correct vocab) that says the children need to enjoy and achieve in art, music, drama, dance, ... - how many children honestly do all of those? I'm pretty good at music myself - I sing, and play 3 instruments to Grade 5, but I'm absolutely dreadful when it comes to art! I hated it at school (I didn't like getting messy!) and so I don't think I'd get many of the CD points as I don't consistently show it across all areas of being 'creative'!
    Now, I've started, I also dislike KUW - how can 6/7 NC curriculum areas be squeezed into 9 profile points - ridiculous!
     
  7. inky

    inky Lead commenter

    Every sane person is irritated by those woolly scale points.
     

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