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Problems with classroom management...

Discussion in 'Behaviour' started by Bumblebeelove, Mar 4, 2011.

  1. Recently, I have been noticing that my first year classroom has been getting quite unruly. The students have been misbehaving in a variety of ways; they talk and laugh during times in which they are to be quiet, and throw objects at me and each other. I have been disciplining them in ways I have deemed appropriate, such as beating them unmercilessly with a riding crop, locking them in the art closet for hours on end, and dousing their faces in cold water. If their parents call the school with questions regarding the large welts, bruises and lacerations on their child's bodies, I say that the child in question fell on the playground. (I have sufficently threatened the children so that they will not reveal my methods of keeping them under my thumb.) It seems to work pretty well, but there is still the persistent child that disrupts the classroom environment. Any thoughts or words of advice?

    -- Sarah
     
  2. Recently, I have been noticing that my first year classroom has been getting quite unruly. The students have been misbehaving in a variety of ways; they talk and laugh during times in which they are to be quiet, and throw objects at me and each other. I have been disciplining them in ways I have deemed appropriate, such as beating them unmercilessly with a riding crop, locking them in the art closet for hours on end, and dousing their faces in cold water. If their parents call the school with questions regarding the large welts, bruises and lacerations on their child's bodies, I say that the child in question fell on the playground. (I have sufficently threatened the children so that they will not reveal my methods of keeping them under my thumb.) It seems to work pretty well, but there is still the persistent child that disrupts the classroom environment. Any thoughts or words of advice?

    -- Sarah
     
  3. bigkid

    bigkid New commenter

    Perhaps you have not been beating them hard enough. Try taking a good run up.
     
  4. RaymondSoltysek

    RaymondSoltysek New commenter

    I've always found murder an effective way of putting an end to persistent disruption. Try something painful too - the garrote is my favourite.
     
  5. ' I have been disciplining them in ways I have deemed appropriate, such as beating them unmercilessly with a riding crop, locking them in the art closet for hours on end, and dousing their faces in cold water.'
    Obviously you haven't been following correct procedure:
    1. ' beating them unmercilessly': How about beating them MERCILESSLY?
    2. 'locking them in the art closet': Too many distractions, besides all the tidying up you must have to do after you let them out. Try chaining them to the leg of the teacher's desk.
    3. 'dousing their faces in cold water': Now you know this isn't the best water-boarding technique. Re-read your CIA manual.
     

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