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Private health care

Discussion in 'Health and wellbeing' started by Miss2012, Feb 11, 2012.

  1. As hubby and I reach our 50's I do wonder about having private health care especially as there is alot of cancer history on husbands side.
    Anyone got private health care for self and advice?

    Miss
     
  2. As hubby and I reach our 50's I do wonder about having private health care especially as there is alot of cancer history on husbands side.
    Anyone got private health care for self and advice?

    Miss
     
  3. Middlemarch

    Middlemarch Star commenter

    Why do you think you'd need it if you got cancer - do you feel the NHS wouldn't provide sufficient care/treatment?
    If you do decide to investigate and possibly buy private healthcare, be aware of these issues:
    1. They will not pay for treatment for any pre-existing conditions and often 'stretch' this definition, e.g. if you've ever had a bad back, they won't reat any issues relating to your back in future. Similarly, if you've had any treatment relating to your uterus (e.g. for painful periods) they might well refuse to pay for treatment for anything relating to your uterus, even if totally unrelated to the painful periods! Check such matters out by asking questions before you buy.
    2. Many policies have a finite limit on how long they will pay for treatment for cancer - sometimes as little as a year. Again, check this out.
     
  4. If you can afford private health care go for it. Do i feel that the NHS wouldnt provide sufficient care/treatment? In a word NO. Treatment really does depend on your post code.
     
  5. Most private health care is limited in terms of both time and money. If you have something really serious it probably won't cover all the treatment you need. When the chips are down the NHS really kicks in and gives you what a private plan won't. I speak from experience. Remember private plans are there to make a profit.
     
  6. BelleDuJour

    BelleDuJour Star commenter

    I am with BUPA. Have been for many years. Most of the time was on my ex-husband's work policy, but when we divorced I tookj out my own, using a health insurance broker who posted on here on a similar thread.
    I got a fantastic deal with reduced premiums in return for a £250 excess in any one year. The reduced premiums were £250 less than without the excess, so if I didn't claim in a year I saved money and if I did claim then I was no worse off than without the excess.
    When I fractured my spine last month I had excellent treatment in A&E, but the subsequent visit to the fracture clinic was appalling! I went straight to my GP and asked if I'd get better treatment if I go through BUPA. His answer was simple.....................'yes'!
    He called a spinal consultant immediately and I had an appointment that evening. I've had physion on BUPA and am still under the consultant. I am seen on time and treated like an iindividual not just another one on the list.
    I will contiinue to pay my BUPA. The NHS often does do a good job but in my experience never as good a job as when you go private.
     

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