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Primary teachers...why don't you teach PE?

Discussion in 'Primary' started by gogojonny, Jun 30, 2011.

  1. gogojonny

    gogojonny New commenter

    Have you actively sought them?
    No one has given me a scuba diving instructor course, but if I asked around then maybe someone might offer me one.
    15 hours is a lot. PE / Games is about going out and developing it yourself. For someone paid 25K+ a year spending one hour of your time at a coaching centre observing good practice shouldn't be too difficult.
    Timetables shouldn't change. You just confuse the poor kids. Special events yes, but there should be a sold structure in place.
     
  2. gogojonny

    gogojonny New commenter

    Since Mr Gove said so.
     
  3. gogojonny

    gogojonny New commenter

    Teaching is about coming up with the lesson yourself.
    With PE there is a market for resources which are practically 'idiot proof'. The kids are told what to do and get on with it.
    I would much rather train staff to teach, however with the amount of excuses there are it is more practical to train them to 'deliver' from pre-written resources rather than teach. That way the kids stand a chance of getting some PE versus none.
     
  4. You still havent answered my question gogojonny
     
  5. This is a typical parental response assuming that teachers just don't bother and lacking any respect for the job we do. None of us are specialists and teaching subjects such as PE, music, art etc require a deeper knowledge and some skill which we don't receive training for but are expected to just perform anyway. These subjects used to be widely taught by subject specialists for a reasons but ever increasing budget cuts have meant that they have been removed. I haven't seen one specialist teacher in 9 years. It's not our choice and most of us do our very best.
     
  6. In my experience the vast majority of teachers do exactly as you've said. I know in my school all classes have timetabled slots in the hall twice a week for 45 mins or 1 hour and everyone is very accommodating when someone needs to swap. When a class needs the hall for show rehearsals most teachers will give up 1 slot but make sure 1 is kept so the children get at least one session that week and when feasible (though not often) we are happy to take them outside.
    I taught infants for along time and never had any problem planning a valid lesson on any PE subject but have recently moved up to seniors and have found it much more challenging to prepare lessons at this level. I have, however, taken it as my responsibility to research for example the rules of volleyball and have done my best to at least teach the basics and give the kids an experience of 'real sports' such as this and this is clearly what they're hungry for at this age. Whether I got it right or not I do not know but I did my best.
    Time for preparation is a real problem in these cases as it's generally down to your own free time and for many personal reasons this can be very limited. I don't know any teachers who wouldn't do the best they could though and certainly none that just 'skip' a PE lesson. We're generally glad to get the kids out of the classroom for an hour for a start.
     
  7. Exactly.
    There are so many subjects we are expected to teach (or as he keeps saying, simply get training for - if only) and any good teacher makes their very best effort to cover a balance of everything.
     
  8. Didn't you tell us we should be teaching them 'proper sports'?
     
  9. Direct link to the information? As far as I'm aware he wants it to be, but it isn't.
     
  10. gogojonny

    gogojonny New commenter

    Depends how often you're missing PE. Always - then yes. If once every so often - then no.
     
  11. gogojonny

    gogojonny New commenter

    I really don't understand. If you are trained to confuse kids with the delights of chunking in Maths then how are you not trained to teach them a chest pass in netball? You're a primary teacher paid to teach everything, if you want to specialise you should teach secondary.
     
  12. gogojonny

    gogojonny New commenter

    You have 2 lessons a week. One should be a traditional PE lesson - fitness, running, gymnastics etc., and one should be a traditional games lesson - rugby, netball, football.
     
  13. gogojonny

    gogojonny New commenter

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-12227491
    The government has said that English, maths, science and PE must remain compulsory for children of all ages.
    That makes it a core subject for me.
     
  14. We teach 13 compulsory subjects in KS1, that hasn't changed that. PE is not a core subject. Gove wants it to be, but at present it is not.

     
  15. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    At key stages 1 and 2 the statutory subjects that all pupils must study are art and design, design and technology, English, geography, history, information and communication technology, mathematics, music, physical education and science. Religious education must also be provided at key stages 1 and 2.

    PE is currently a foundation subject along with art and design, design and technology, geography, history, information and communication technology, music, physical education.
     
  16. TweedJacket

    TweedJacket New commenter

    I can't believe the troll has been fed for 19 pages.
     
  17. It's the end of term. We're all bored now that reports are finished.
     
  18. gogojonny

    gogojonny New commenter

    I can't believe that some primary teachers still get away with not teaching PE.
     
  19. TweedJacket

    TweedJacket New commenter

    Trip, trap, trip, trap...

     
  20. I can't believe a specialist presumes to tell generalist teachers how to do their jobs.
    Tell me, Jonny. Could you deliver a club-standard swimming lesson to the same level that I could? How about a primary science lesson? Can you inspire children to write a page of rhyming couplets in iambic pentameter? Maybe you're also an expert on phonics? Or a dab-hand at imparting basic numeracy skills?
    You can't do what class teachers do. You can't even do what I do as an LSA.
    So while we appreciate constructive criticism and advice, you can take your self-satisfied, sanctimonious attitude, and tuck it safely inside your cricketing jockstrap.
     

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