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Primary PE warm ups ideas

Discussion in 'Physical education' started by atkinsonh, Mar 9, 2006.

  1. Hi,

    Has anybody got a good website/a book/suggestions/files, which has a huge list of different types of warm ups for primary aged kids?
    I know about the 'beans' activity, traffic lights and tig but do you know any more. my lessons are turning a little boring.
    Thanks in advanced

    HA
     
  2. Hi,

    Has anybody got a good website/a book/suggestions/files, which has a huge list of different types of warm ups for primary aged kids?
    I know about the 'beans' activity, traffic lights and tig but do you know any more. my lessons are turning a little boring.
    Thanks in advanced

    HA
     
  3. What's your email address?
     
  4. Below is a sheet of warm-up games I gave to staff in my school. Most of them you probably already know, but there may be something new for you to use.

    Warm-up Games

    Here are some ideas for warming up your children prior to stretching out, that you may wish to use in your indoor P.E. sessions. Many of them you?ve probably come across before, but hopefully there are some new ideas here which you could use.

    1. Stuck in the mud

    Choose children to be on, number will depend on size of group. The other children run round, whilst the chosen children try to catch them. If they are tagged, they stand feet wide apart arms out to side. A friend may release them by crawling through their legs. Adapt so that children are in different positions when tagged. Can link to gymnastics by getting children to go into the plank position once caught. A friend may release them by crawling under their belly. Adapt so children are in half V sit so legs are up hands on ground or full v-sit for more able, less able sit in supported v-sit with legs bent. Friend steps carefully over them to release. Other alternatives include children sitting in dish, arch, bridge etc.

    This game focuses on getting the pulse rate up and raising the blood temperature, whilst introducing core strength skills and elements which you may wish to use later on in your lesson.

    2. Crabs

    Some children walk on hands and feet in a crab position. Other children have to jump around on two feet in a designated area. The crab either has to tap someone with their arm or their foot. As soon as someone is caught they then become a crab. Game continues until all children have been caught.
    This game focuses on getting the pulse rate up and raising the blood temperature. It encourages team work, evasive tactics and co-ordination skills.

    3. Travellers and Stayers

    Children get into pairs. They form an inner and outer circle, one person from the pair in the inner circle, whilst their partner stands behind them creating an outer circle. The person in the centre of the circle is the stayer. They do a static strengthening exercise e.g. plank, v-sit, dish, arch, straddle sit, long sit etc. Depending on how difficult the static exercise is determines how many times you send the travellers around the circle. Travellers can be asked to run, hop, jump, bounce, skip, sashay, crawl etc. around the circle. Children should be taught which direction clockwise and anti-clockwise is and vary the directions in which the travellers have to travel. Once they get back to their partner they tap them on the shoulder or crawl under their bellies for example if they are in a plank position, stand up and swap over. You can make it into a game by giving the pair which stands up last a forfeit.

    This game focuses on getting the pulse rate up and raising the blood temperature, whilst introducing core strength skills and elements which you may wish to use later on in your lesson.


    4. Horses and Jockeys

    This game is similar to the one above. Children get into pairs and one becomes the horse the other the jockey. (Care is needed here to ensure correct pairings; both children need to be able to give the other a piggy back). The jockey gets onto the back of the horse. Teacher will give an instruction, for example jockey?s run round the circle anti-clockwise twice. As soon as the jockey gets back they become the horse and their partner jumps on their back. A forfeit is given to the last pair to be in the piggy back position. Ensure children are not on each others backs for longer than necessary.

    This game focuses on getting the pulse rate up and raising the blood temperature and may also introduce skills which you will focus on, later on in the lesson.


    5. Port Starboard

    The hall becomes a boat. Children learn that Port is the left side of the boat, Starboard is the right side of the boat and that the stern is the back and the bow is the front. Teacher shouts instructions like, climb the rigging, captain?s coming, scrub the decks, man overboard, port, starboard, bow, stern etc. and children either carry out the action which goes with that instruction or run to the area of the boat being called.

    This game focuses on getting the pulse rate up and raising the blood temperature.


    The following games are not really suitable for a warm-up but are great fun to play and can introduce other skills:

    6. Skinning the snake

    Split children into teams with five or six children per team. Each team should stand in a line fairly close to one another with their legs straddled. Children place their right arm between their legs and their left arm holds the hand of the person in front of them. Ensuring the chain isn?t broken the person at the end of the line carefully lies down whilst everyone else walks backwards. You continue this process until everyone is lying on the floor. Make sure as each person lies down they squeeze their legs in so the people walking back don?t trip over them. Once the last person is lying down, they get back up again and walk forwards until everyone is back in the starting position. Once the children know how to do this it can be turned into a competition. Any team which breaks the chain is disqualified.

    This game focuses on children?s co-ordination and team work; it is also a good way of stretching out their hamstrings. You would need to do some form of running, skipping, jumping exercise to get pulse rate up and blood flowing prior to playing this game.

    7. Hoop down the line

    Your T.A?s who went to Georgian gardens for the afternoon the other week will know a variation of this one.

    Split the children into teams. Each team forms a line holding hands, all children facing the same direction. Choose which end of the line you are going to start from. Each child at that end of the line should be given a hoop. (This should be large enough for their bodies to pass through). The aim of the game is to pass the hoop all the way down the line. The first team to do this wins. The first child cannot use their hand to lift the hoop over their head, nor can any other children release a finger or two to assist them. Make the game more difficult by using smaller hoops or by challenging children to beat a certain time.

    The variation your T.A.?s know which would make a nice cool down, is to have the children in one large circle. The hoop or hoops need to be passed around the circle.

    8. Duck, duck, goose

    Children sit in a circle. Pick a child to walk around the circle, tapping heads saying duck, duck, duck etc. until they get to someone whom they want to chase them, they then say goose. The person saying goose has to run around the circle and try and sit in that persons space before being caught.

    You could adapt the game so that the children in the circle are doing some static strengthening exercises like the ones mentioned previously.

    This is a nice game, but as most of the children are stationary would not be suitable as a warm-up game.

    If anyone knows any other nice warm-up games that I have not included here, please let me know.
     
  5. happy shopper can I email you for the warm up games also?
     
  6. I have a few ideas that I use with my children and recommend them to my colleagues in school.

    They are different ideas/games for different subject areas ie, dance/gym/games.

    If anyone is interested please post your email addresses and I will forward them. Any more ideas are always gratefully recieved though as I am comiling a resource list for the staff in the school as we speak, hence the reason i'm on the site!
     
  7. Could i have a copy also please, would be really useful so thanks in advance bozza, happyshopper and primary pe teacher if that is ok ?!?!

    keaney007@hotmail.com
     
  8. Please can I jump on the wagon if people don't mind sending warm up ideas. Currently doing PGCE and could do with some help if possible! Thanks Katy
    k.j.cuckston@ex.ac.uk
     
  9. brfcsc

    brfcsc New commenter

    Looking to become PE coordinator in school and need all the help/resources I can get. If I could get a copy that would be fab.
    brfcsc@hotmail.co.uk
     
  10. I'd love a copy too. I always struggle with teaching PE on supply and for some reason have to teach it almost every day!

    sscourfield@hotmail.com

    Thanks a million
     
  11. aloha

    aloha New commenter

  12. Hey guys,
    I didnt get an e mail with the warm ups, is it possible for you to re send? cheers.
    atkinsonh@yahoo.co.uk
     
  13. Always interested in knowing more.

    Any chance i could have warm ups too please?

    gez81@yahoo.co.uk

    Ta.
     
  14. Primary PE Teacher - wondering if i could have a copy of your warm-ups as my kids are getting a little bored of the ones that I use - even though they are varied from lesson to lesson - thanks a million - d3jag@hotmail.com
     
  15. I would also be most grateful if you could send me your PE warm up ideas.

    Many thanks in advance: e.parker10@btinternet.com
     

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