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Primary PE scheme

Discussion in 'Physical education' started by jactom, Jan 27, 2011.

  1. jactom

    jactom New commenter

    Can anyone recommend a good PE scheme for primary school. Teachers are working off plans written several years ago by a PE co-ordinator. I know of LCP and Val Sabin but hear they aren't that brilliant.There doesn't seem to be much out there and would like to write my own but just don't have the time! I think teachers would feel more confident if they had a good scheme to follow.
     
  2. jactom

    jactom New commenter

    Can anyone recommend a good PE scheme for primary school. Teachers are working off plans written several years ago by a PE co-ordinator. I know of LCP and Val Sabin but hear they aren't that brilliant.There doesn't seem to be much out there and would like to write my own but just don't have the time! I think teachers would feel more confident if they had a good scheme to follow.
     
  3. i have been specializing in Primary PE for 6 years now and am constantly on the look out for good schemes of work and lesson plans. We have Val Sabin and LCP at our school and I agree with your comments particularly in respect of the Val Sabin. Old fashioned and very dull in parts. However I have found the LCP plans useful for whole school planning.The gymnastics and dance are easy to pick up and follow for any teacher who has little time to plan for PE which, let's be honest, is the majority of teachers. However it is not always challenging enough or engaging enough in the invasion games sections and often the Y3&4 stuff is not t hat different to the 5/6 stuff. The additional resources I use are books on netball, tag rugby and cricket which you can purchase through the catalogues at school or with Sainsbury's vouchers. I have also found the Primary Rescources website really useful. Hope this helps. Good Luck.
     
  4. stopwatch

    stopwatch Occasional commenter

    Hello Rachel1007,
    what is LCP, how much is it and where do you get it from?
    Thanks. [​IMG]
     
  5. They have a website and it is a very commonly used learning resource in Primary Schools. They are also used for science throughout our school. I obtained them from a rep who came to a PPD session run by our school sports partnership and i know a lot of schools in the area also use them. Each set costs £149.50 plus VAT and if you want to get it for the whole school (which I did) there is one for Foundation Stage; KS1; KS2 Years 3&4 and KS2 Years 5&6. A lot of the dance lessons coincide with curriculum topics in each year group e.g. toys, animals, weather in KS1 - Egyptians in KS2. See below for link.l


    http://www.lcp.co.uk/primary/pe/peresourcefiles/
     
  6. gogojonny

    gogojonny New commenter

    Most games planning is just awful - so basic and patronising for most Year 5/6s. Dance is also bad - when you get to 10 years old you want to be dancing to Michael Jackson or some trendy pop music, not 'The Wheels on the Bus'.
    I used to use Val Sabin a lot but she has squeezed every possible gym lesson out of each move possible, you could reduce the file in size easily.
    Going to write my own soon - about time for a decent scheme that actually gets kids playing sport instead of prancing around the hall on tip toes. Nothing wrong with prancing around in Key Stage 1 but when they get to Y6 it's about time there was some age appropriate activity.
     
  7. We've got our own schemes at school, usually written by the PE department and then adapted by the various teachers who teach PE.
    Our lessons are split into Games and PE, so they are doing different things in their lessons each week (Autumn - Hockey/Rugby in Games, Basic Skills and Dance in PE; Spring - Netball/Football in Games, Gymnastics and Fitness in PE, etc.).
    For Dance, our Y5s are doing Michael Jackson and the Y6s are doing Rock'n'Roll. They usually like it,...I'm not sure I'd consider "The Wheels on the Bus".
    However, I personally prefer to plan my own lessons and try out new things. For Gymnastics, I have ditched the school planning and taken ideas from a "Sports Didactics" book from Germany. I've kept the objectives, but the actual activities are very different and a lot more exciting for my pupils. (It does, however, mean that the person teaching needs enough confidence to do that,...and I'm lucky to have a really supportive PE department, who allow me to try my own ideas.) This has increased the enthusiasm of my class in relation to gymnastics tremendously. They love it, and even my boys are really keen on doing gym (after starting off really annoyed about having to do another "girly" unit and moaning that last year they had to "jump around, making letters").
     
  8. stopwatch

    stopwatch Occasional commenter

    I don't suppose you would like to share some of your ideas or even, dare I say send some schemes/plans.
    I am very confident with gymnastics, but feel like a new approach and some new ideas would be great.
    Anything appreciated. [​IMG]
     
  9. gogojonny

    gogojonny New commenter

    Wheels on the Bus was an extreme example (!) but I have seen some very bad dance plans. Rock and roll sounds fab. I remember doing rock and roll when I was at school and since it was towards the end of Y6 we had a rock and roll party as a leavers do.
    Good about the gym - again some very bad plans around. Val Sabin works for early years but any good PE department should have their own plans based on the needs of the pupils. Gymnastics is basically fitness for all but you can enphasise to your games players how it can improve their game. Get the boys on board and you're away!
     
  10. Hello there Jatcom,
    We at Budokai Martial Arts specialise in teaching the martial arts to primary school children. So far we work in the field of PPA Cover sessions for various schools around the West Yorkshire region but it is proving to be extremely popular with the children as well as the teachers.
    Whilst the grounding is a fighting art, the warm ups, physical and mental aspects of the training and the stretching and cooling down are as good at getting the children fit as any aerobics class could be.
    If you can get a good coach in your area then have a chat with them about it. We are all full members of Sports Coach UK and I have a Level 3 NCFE Award in Sports Psychology as well as an SAC Diploma in Sports Psychology. Along with an NVQ in coaching karate and my 3rd Dan Black Belt in Hakuda Ryu Karate I can make some very exciting and interesting PE lessons for the children.
    Not only do we do PPA Cover but we also do 'after school clubs' which means that those children that have an affinity for the martial arts can come along to them after school! At the end of the day, not ALL children are team players and the martial arts allows these children to develop at their own pace. It is a very personal journey for everybody that embarks on the martial arts and they get out of it what they put in... if you know what I mean [​IMG]
    I wish you all the best in your search.
    Kyuudousha!

     
  11. Try the 'Leicestershire' Scheme of work written by 2 Primary coordinators( Sam Gorman and Katie Dawkins). It covers foundation to year six for all areas of activity( including swimming)-it's QCA based it costs £55.00. It's TOPS based-but most schools have these or they can be bought from the YST.It has a large section on Assessment for learning. It comes in CD Rom format which is able to be copied into your own format. Lots of Partnerships have bought this scheme for their schools and the feedback is very good.For more information you can email sam@blaby.com
     

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