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Primary NQT with no job - what next?

Discussion in 'New teachers' started by guiding_star, Jul 20, 2011.

  1. Hi all
    I'm an NQT (i.e. just finished my 3 year teacher training), I took two years out before uni to work in schools both in the UK and abroad - in all the age groups in primary so had plenty of experience before I started my course which stood me in good stead and I passed every placement with an outstanding. I have plenty to offer a school - good team worker, enthusiastic, flexible, musician, specialist in MFL and Biology but still I have no job. I have come 2nd in all my interviews apart from my first and the feed back has been "We really liked you, but we chose someone else" the last school actually said there was nothing else I could do better but still didn't give me a job! Its really frustrating when many of my friends (who incidentally struggled through placements getting low marks and even cause for concerns) have nailed jobs and I haven't. It means I've had to move back in with my parents where I haven't lived for 4 years which is really difficult. I really don't like supply teaching - I did it whilst I was at uni (regular with the same class in a school that I love) but I hated it - I hate not being able to be creative, being asked to do handwriting/RE/finishing off day in day out, not knowing the correct policies of the school etc. I also know that personally I can't handle the not knowing if I'm working or not from day to day.
    What are the alternatives? I want to go abroad but my parents won't let me because it would be difficult for interviews for next year though there are several jobs I know I could walk into abroad. I would consider doing something else for a year but I don't know what. I'm just really stuck and any advice would be brilliant.
    x
     
  2. Hi all
    I'm an NQT (i.e. just finished my 3 year teacher training), I took two years out before uni to work in schools both in the UK and abroad - in all the age groups in primary so had plenty of experience before I started my course which stood me in good stead and I passed every placement with an outstanding. I have plenty to offer a school - good team worker, enthusiastic, flexible, musician, specialist in MFL and Biology but still I have no job. I have come 2nd in all my interviews apart from my first and the feed back has been "We really liked you, but we chose someone else" the last school actually said there was nothing else I could do better but still didn't give me a job! Its really frustrating when many of my friends (who incidentally struggled through placements getting low marks and even cause for concerns) have nailed jobs and I haven't. It means I've had to move back in with my parents where I haven't lived for 4 years which is really difficult. I really don't like supply teaching - I did it whilst I was at uni (regular with the same class in a school that I love) but I hated it - I hate not being able to be creative, being asked to do handwriting/RE/finishing off day in day out, not knowing the correct policies of the school etc. I also know that personally I can't handle the not knowing if I'm working or not from day to day.
    What are the alternatives? I want to go abroad but my parents won't let me because it would be difficult for interviews for next year though there are several jobs I know I could walk into abroad. I would consider doing something else for a year but I don't know what. I'm just really stuck and any advice would be brilliant.
    x
     
  3. littlemissraw

    littlemissraw Occasional commenter

    Your parents want the best for you but ultimately its your decision not theirs... x

     
  4. This is a personal opinion but I feel all NQT's should do supply before having a full time post. It gets you working on your toes and handling tricky classes and having to think up lessons extremely quickly and having to make do with lack of resources.
    In my opinion once you have done supply you are pretty much solid enough for anything that could be thrown at you.
    You also see lots of ideas from everywhere about different ways to do something and not get stuck in a rut.
    No one 'likes' not knowing whether they are working or not, but you get used to it. Every few months you get a bit fed up but then something happens and it makes you feel ok again.
    As for not having a job straight out of course, it seems to be a thing that people have been told there are plenty of jobs. Just check the unemployed forum to see this isnt so. I'm not on supply from desire to be but two jobs I've been offered over the last year have been pulled because the school budget was slashed and a teacher had to go, so the one not officially signed yet was the one to go..
    I finished my course 7 years ago. I've had 3 maternity contracts since. The rest of the time has been on supply. Dont assume that you will get a job in one year's time just because you did well on your course. It's not all about how you go at interview, it's about the hole the school has they need filling. They need the right person, and you dont want to be in the post if you arent that person, it's not a healthy position for you or the school.
    Go abroad if you want, i'm not sure how this will affect your job prospects in the UK, others might know better. I dont think it'll hinder you, but you might get fed up of travelling back and forth for interviews etc at short notice. You also might be asked more questions about how well you have kept up to date with the UK education system if you have been out of the loop for a year.Also will the post abroad be happy about you using them as stop-gaps? If you decide it's too much or you dont get a post out there, then do supply and be patient.
     
    princexlyn84 likes this.
  5. I have done supply since I finished my final placement in December - so that is pretty much 6 months worth! Yes I have learnt a lot from that but I'm ready to settle down somewhere now. I've had a very turmulous (not sure thats a real word!) few years and seem to get a lot of s**t thrown at my life so it just feels like the straw that broke the camel's back! And the prospect of not having a job AGAIN come next September chills me right through.
    In regards to abroad I have contacts in British schools which is what I have worked with before when I have been abroad - they follow the British curriculum sometimesmore so than the UK does!
     
  6. Getting a teaching post is a just a waiting game. I honestly believe that there is a school out there for everyone. After graduating I did a year of supply, and in alot of ways it has made me understand exactly what type of school I want to teach in. I moved away from home, not abroad, but 4 hours away, it was a tough decision to make at first, but where I lived there were barely any teaching vacancies. Now after a year of working really hard, doing as much supply as I could get and trying to make a good impression at every single school, I finaly have a job.
    Those teachers who get out of a job fresh uni are incredibly lucky, don't compare yourself to them. There is a perfect school out there for you, which will suit your beliefs and style of teaching. Just think positive and get as much supply as you can....you never know you might find your dream school through supply!

     
  7. welshwizard

    welshwizard Established commenter Forum guide

    Many new teachers do begin their careers via supply and long term posts for a term or longer could count towards the induction period but you will find you need to push for this with the agencies and schools and make sure that it is formally recorded and assessed. The daily supply route has statutory limits. You a can initially only do 16 months from your first supply date -after that you need to get an extension for a further 12 months from a LA in order to carry on working in schools as a supply teacher.
    There is a positive to working overseas in that you do not begin the 16 month limit so you can start supply clock ticking on return which gives you a longer period plus you will have the teaching experience from overseas to put on your application.
     
  8. Having done whole year on the supply train, I know the feeling of uneasiness not knowing which school you're going to...or if you're even going! It is hard and I do empathise with everyone in the same situation.

    You are a musician: why not put yourself out there with schools who know you and offer to do an extra-curricular club for their children? Or MFL club? From personal experience, if you 'get to know' a school it puts you in a good position should a job become available there.

    You could write to a few local schools to see if they need regular PPA cover? I am sure many schools will have thought they'd covered all bases but then realise someone's PPA/NQT time isn't covered come September! If they've got your letter in front of them offering to cover and stating the info in the paragraph above, you never know they may just call on you. It'd be cheaper than agencies for them. For you, at least you'd know where you were going every, say, Friday for example. There might even be some potential there to be creative/plan some lessons for stressed-out teachers who could do with the help!

    If you are anything like me I simply could't bare living with my parents while on supply and job-seeking. The worst part is the prying questions and unhelpful suggestions i.e. "Couldn't 'so and so' school offer you a job?"

    If you can 'walk into' a position which would allow you to do you NQT year abroad, if I were you I would cut my losses and do it. But I'd make sure it was guaranteed before booking my flight! At least that way you'd have your NQT year under your belt, maybe develop you language skills, get a tan, and come back with a whole new perspective. The way I see it, once you have done your NQT year the teaching world is your oyster. The 16-month rule won't apply and you can supply teach (even if you hate it, it is essential experience for the job-seeking jobless teacher!) while looking for work.

    That's my advice...........................hope it helps : )
     
  9. I'd prefer to do supply teaching under my own steam if I do have to do it (I.e. going into schools and offering my services) as it is less up in the air that way and I think I could handle it a bit more! I have already started my 16 months of supply when I was at uni so that is already ticking unfortunately, and you can't do your NQT year abroad - or I'd be there like a shot! Also considering HLTA work if any comes up.
    I have signed up with a supply agency but it just makes me feel uneasy, I don't know why!
    I just don't like feeling so unsettled - like I've failed something!
     
  10. welshwizard

    welshwizard Established commenter Forum guide

    You need to check out how the local schools recruit supply teachers. Footslogging around schools may not be viable ! I would caution you against HLTA work as some Headteachers would consider you are doing this because you were not up to teaching!
    NQT induction can be done overseas particularly in the Service Education schools- they advertise towards back of TES
     
  11. I'm considering this too but makes sure you phone the school to see if the Head is happy to receive applications from NQTs. This is what I did for the last HLTA job I considered and the Head said "I've spoken to the LA about this, and because we advertised it as an HLTA job, we cannot accept applications from NQTs."
     
  12. I have just completed a year on supply and I agree that it's a fantastic thing to do as an NQT - I have learned more than I did on the PGCE about certain aspects of being in the classroom and I have apparently earned a reputation with my agency as being the toughest NQT they've ever had on their books for my area - as I went to a school where every single supply teacher has left in tears and kept the class in line (still not sure how, I hasten to add). In short, it really helps you to develop techniques with different types of classes and if you do well, you can make a great name for yourself for future applications!
    I've just got my first post after thinking I would have to give up - so please don't, if you persist then the perfect job will be just around the corner! I got very disheartened from the number of interviews where I was told I came second to the successful candidate, but as a non-teacher friend of mine said, they obviously weren't meant to be and the right school will come along! Best of luck!
     
  13. Congrats on your post she_who_dares! It's good to have some encouraging posts for those of us who are still waiting for the 'right school to come along'.
     
  14. Crowbob

    Crowbob Established commenter

    I may be wrong, but I was under the impression that the 16 month rule only applied to QUALIFIED TEACHERS. You were not a qualified teacher when you were at uni, were you? If not I can't see that the supply clock is ticking. If I am wrong, I am sure someone will put me right. The following is from the statutory guidance:
    3.17 A qualified teacher, who has not completed
    an induction period, can undertake some shortterm
    supply work in a relevant school8 (see para
    1.19) but this is limited to 16 months only.

     
  15. Sorry to sound like an idiot, but can you explain more about doing an NQT year abroad and where would I find these jobs being advertised, or would I have to purchase TES
     
  16. I can only speak for myself here but it depends on the type of school you want to work in - I'll be in a British International School where the head used to live in this country and has done mentorship before, and is very keen on helping young teachers to develop, so she applied for NQT mentor certification. A lot of international schools run like independents do here and are by no means obliged to offer NQT induction.
    However, if you want to look for jobs abroad (because some schools will still offer induction), you can look in all sorts of places. I have found no site with more foreign postings suitable for UK teachers than the TES jobs section - although I found mine by registering my teaching CV on a number of websites (CV library, that sort of thing - there are loads!), and the recruitment agency used by my school found me that way and got in touch. Jobs for September are moving very quickly so you might have luck if you register now!
     
  17. I don't know how to reply with quotes!
    You can only do NQT in certain service schools abroad in Gibraltar for example and these I gather are quite hard to come by!
    About 16 months supply - I started before I had completed my course so that didn't count but I continued for about a month after I had finished uni and got my results so I'm guessing that will count as qualified? I'm not really sure how it all works - everyone says something different!
    Thanks for the info on HLTA - I do have friends who have been turned down because they have a teaching qualification.
    I have been offered supply by a previous interview school (I was irritatingly close with that one!) and my local junior school have said I just need to pop in with my CV and stuff, but I am known by them already. Maybe its best to do a mix of that and agency. I just don't like not knowing what I am doing from day to day - being rung up in the morning to find out where I'm going...I just can't do it, it really makes me feel uneasy!

     
  18. The easy way is to hit "reply" on the specific post you want to reply to, then hit "quote", and the entire post will appear inside quote coding. You can then delete any irrelevant stuff that you don't want to quote. Once you've done that you can look at the coding used so in future you can quote more than one person in the same post!
    I forgot about service schools, but you're right on that as well as SCE Germany, Cyprus and possibly others run an NQT pool when they're low on numbers (I applied and just missed the cut this year!). The SCE website is probably the best place to monitor for those jobs, but I was alerted to the vacancy by the job centre, as it happens!


    I suppose I must just be quite lucky that my Head is really keen and thus applied for mentorship certification for my school, as to do your NQT year abroad is, as guiding_star says, not very common. A bit of a pain, but it's just a case of keeping your eyes open and diligently checking the adverts I think!
     
  19. I was one the lucky ones who got a job on my first interview and have just completed my NQT year. However, I have also been made redundant from the school. I was the one with the least amount of experience and was one of the 'chosen ones' (of which the numbers reached double figures). It's been a really stressful year with Ofsted (twice) and the redundancy process but still....
    I have been fortunate to have been given the post of cover supervisor in the school with the prospect of still teaching some English. I am actually really starting to look forward to it as it means that I have a whole new challenge to face. Not only will I teach pupils from classes I haven't taught before, but also other subjects. It's going to look amazing when I apply for jobs to start in January as it shows that I can adapt to othe, more challenging things.
    I would seriously consider doing cover work. It's not for everybody, it's not really what I want but I still need to pay the bills, but just think of the experience that it will give you!
    Sarah
     
  20. Can an NQT who has not secured a job, work as a cover supervisor or work as a T.A?
    (To delay supply work- so the clock doesn't tick!)
     

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