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Pretentious, impenetrable, hard work ... better? Why we need difficult books I The Guardian

Discussion in 'English' started by AndrewvanZyl, Nov 12, 2018.

  1. AndrewvanZyl

    AndrewvanZyl Occasional commenter

    This year’s Booker-winner Milkman has been criticised for being challenging. But are we confusing readability with literary value?

    The fascination of what’s difficult,” wrote WB Yeats, “has dried the sap out of my veins ... ” In the press coverage of this year’s Man Booker prize winner, Anna Burns’s Milkman, we’ve read a good many commentators presenting with sapless veins – but a dismaying lack of any sense that what’s difficult might be fascinating.

    “Odd”, “impenetrable”, “hard work”, “challenging” and “brain-kneading” have been some of the epithets chosen. They have not been meant, I think, as compliments. The chair of the judges, Kwame Anthony Appiah, perhaps unhelpfully, humblebragged that: “I spend my time reading articles in the Journal of Philosophy, so by my standards this is not too hard.” But he added that Milkman is “challenging […] the way a walk up Snowdon is challenging. It is definitely worth it because the view is terrific when you get to the top.”
     

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