1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

Preschool/Reception reading - can you help a confused parent?

Discussion in 'Primary' started by sleepingbunny, Aug 16, 2011.

  1. Sorry, I'm not a teacher. I'm just a confused Mum whose daughter is in the preschool of the school where she will start Reception. She's just turned four and we had the choice to start her September or January. At the urging of the Head (and to be honest because it was more convenient for us) we opted for Jan. But now she's one of a group of just four children in the January cohort and I'm really concerned about her reading.
    I hadn't really bargained on her being so obsessed by reading at home in the last term.She now decodes CVC words, and can work her way fairly laboriously through Songbirds books in purple and green (cheap from the Book People!). They do some rudimentary phonics in preschool, but don't read with them individually. The teachers had not noticed she could decode and blend until I pointed it out.They probably now hate me for being a pushy mummy - but my daughter was so proud when one of the teachers then went through a book with her - it was the first time they had done it. Then my daughter got chicken pox until the end of term, so that was that, really.
    The kids who start in Sept will have individual reading three times a week while my daughter has none. She will also miss out on the first term of phonics, and no-one has explained what they will do with the tiny number of Jan starters when it comes to catching them up. I now feel I should have opted for September against the Head's advice, just like everyone else did (and she has given me the opportunity to do so, but I would have to arrange all my childcare again).
    What can I do to make sure my daughter doesn't slip through the net? I'd stress that my daughter can: sit still, put own coat on, wipe bottom, recognise name, change her own clothes, etc etc.. I was just taking generic advice from the Head about summer-borns and school start dates, it wasn't specific to her.
    If anyone can help me I would be grateful. And I will rearrange all the childcare if that is my only option. At the moment, the whole thing is just baffling to me. It's so long since I was at school, and all so different that I can't work out what to do. This is a Good school (with Outstanding Features, no less) in Inner London, if that makes any differenc. It also doesn't have split year classes (any more.

     
  2. Sorry, I'm not a teacher. I'm just a confused Mum whose daughter is in the preschool of the school where she will start Reception. She's just turned four and we had the choice to start her September or January. At the urging of the Head (and to be honest because it was more convenient for us) we opted for Jan. But now she's one of a group of just four children in the January cohort and I'm really concerned about her reading.
    I hadn't really bargained on her being so obsessed by reading at home in the last term.She now decodes CVC words, and can work her way fairly laboriously through Songbirds books in purple and green (cheap from the Book People!). They do some rudimentary phonics in preschool, but don't read with them individually. The teachers had not noticed she could decode and blend until I pointed it out.They probably now hate me for being a pushy mummy - but my daughter was so proud when one of the teachers then went through a book with her - it was the first time they had done it. Then my daughter got chicken pox until the end of term, so that was that, really.
    The kids who start in Sept will have individual reading three times a week while my daughter has none. She will also miss out on the first term of phonics, and no-one has explained what they will do with the tiny number of Jan starters when it comes to catching them up. I now feel I should have opted for September against the Head's advice, just like everyone else did (and she has given me the opportunity to do so, but I would have to arrange all my childcare again).
    What can I do to make sure my daughter doesn't slip through the net? I'd stress that my daughter can: sit still, put own coat on, wipe bottom, recognise name, change her own clothes, etc etc.. I was just taking generic advice from the Head about summer-borns and school start dates, it wasn't specific to her.
    If anyone can help me I would be grateful. And I will rearrange all the childcare if that is my only option. At the moment, the whole thing is just baffling to me. It's so long since I was at school, and all so different that I can't work out what to do. This is a Good school (with Outstanding Features, no less) in Inner London, if that makes any differenc. It also doesn't have split year classes (any more.

     
  3. I didn't think split intake happened any more [​IMG]
     
  4. I'm not making it up! I can name the London borough for you if you like, but it makes the whole thing a bit obvious - we were given the choice, but the head guided us heavily towards Jan.
     
  5. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    Parents have the right to defer entry ... the child has to be in full time education (not school) by the term after their 5th birthday so entry can be deferred up to the end of the school year (not beyond)
     
  6. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    I'm not sure why a head would urge a parent to delay entry unless there was significant SEN ...
    Why do you imagine your daughter will slip through the net? If the school has adviced deferring they obviously able to accomodate different intakes. You must understand the other children will have had 3 terms in school (and all the activities and experiences offered) whereas your daughter will have only two.
     
  7. I know they have the right to defer entry. I just didn't think split intakes were being offered as an option any longer. Perhaps it is just our part of London that doesn't do it.
     
  8. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    I'm afraid it isn't an option offered it is a parental right to demand
     
  9. No-one has ever suggested any SEN. She's young, and therefore gets a bit tired - but that's my reading of the situation, the Head would have no idea of her specific circs in this case. I do understand she'll only have two terms of Recep - but she's in the preschool of the same school and I was assured would get the same sort of teaching. But with only four from her school year, I imagine this won't happen. That's why I think she'll slip through the net.
    And yes, i do understand that - she's only had two terms at preschool, where older children have had three. Either way, she loses, as far as I can see.
     
  10. And please, I didn't demand anything - I took the head's advice. It's her school and I assumed that she knew what she was doing
     
  11. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    The actual bit of the admission code says


    2.69 Admission authorities must allow parents of children who are offered a
    place at the school before they are of compulsory school age to defer their
    child's entry until later in the school year. Where entry is deferred, admission
    authorities must hold the place for that child and not offer it to another child. The parent would not however be able to defer entry beyond the beginning of the term after the child's fifth birthday, nor beyond the academic year for which the original application was accepted. This must be made clear in the admission arrangements for the school.

     
  12. So at the moment you are just basing your concerns on assumptions and your imagination.
    If 'she loses' as far as you can see then why did you agree in the first place?
     
  13. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    I would be extremely alarmed if this was true!
     
  14. Doesn't everyone base their concerns on assumptions and their own imagination occasionally? She's my daughter, and I'm just trying to get things right for her - this is all new to me. What I meant by her losing is that she only got two terms in preschool because the younger kids only got the chance to start in January - the older kids have already had a year. I can't indulge in time travel so that she gets that extra term back again.
    I

     
  15. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    I'm referring to two terms in reception not in pre school
     
  16. Thanks. I understand that you are - I was trying to explain why she loses out either way - she either has only two terms in preschool or only two terms in reception. I suppose I'm trying to work out whether reception is 'worth' more than preschool (is it?). And why my daughter's head wants all summerborns deferred when everyone else seems to think that this is a bad idea.
    Thanks for your thoughts. Appreciate those who have been kind enough to give me their opinions
     
  17. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    I think you really need to address your concerns with the school as we can only speculate on their intentions regarding the four children who will start in January. How closely does the pre schoolwork with the reception staff? Is it on the same site? Would there be an option for your daughter/ the four children to join in the phonics session?
     
  18. I fail to understand why she loses out though?
     
  19. Well as a teacher who has also had relatives go through the Steiner system where they do not start reading and writing until they are 7 and then outstrip the local schools I think you should be involved with your child's education but not panic.
    If she is reading at home with you then great. Remember the statistics - from 0 to 16 your child will only spend a small amount of of her waking hours in school. She will also be learning pre-reading and comprehension skills at school as well as reading sounds. If she has a good early years education then she should be accessing learning through play and her teacher should know where her level is. If you can help the school by pointing out that she enjoys blending words at home they should not be upset - sometimes it is more about how you say things rather that what you say. They should have systems so that teachers record what you say to contribute towards her learning journey records.
    Phonics is important and the school should be teaching your child. If they are a Good school then she will already be learning letters and sounds and will have a rich learning environment. I would say the school are lucky to have a caring, supportive and interested parent. If you work with the teacher your child will not have missed out at all. Having spent time at home in a supportive home will not deprive your child. The most important learning a child can do is learning that they are loved, how to ask questions and look for answers and how to get on with others.
     
  20. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    “It is a very bad thing to be able to write early,” Steiner said. “Reading and writing are really not suited to the human being until a later age — the eleventh or twelfth year.”
    Steiner schools base reading readiness on when the child's permanent teeth emerge ..
     

Share This Page