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Preparing Pupils for Life after School

Discussion in 'Scotland - curriculum' started by anon2222, May 10, 2012.

  1. As an FE teacher (Electrical/Electronic) and prior to that a Maths teacher, I find pupils do not have basic Maths skills required to progress quickly. FE lecturers are generally unexpecting of the lacking skillset of pupils - e.g. they have no understanding of engineering units; limiting numeracy skills; poor understanding and manipulation of "formulae"; the thoughts that Pythagoras and Trigonometry which are used on a daily basis will never have an application in the real world...
    I suggest that the piece of paper defining what we "teach to" is less important than what the pupil has when he or she comes out of the school, with respect to practical Maths skills that would help them with their future training and life.
    The amibiguity of CfE assessment should allow teachers the freedom to really get to grips with what pupils will need, rather than focusing on what skills they should have to attain a certain mark in an exam. This requires close collaboration with other departments (e.g. Physics), and communication between schools and FE/Industry.
     
  2. As an FE teacher (Electrical/Electronic) and prior to that a Maths teacher, I find pupils do not have basic Maths skills required to progress quickly. FE lecturers are generally unexpecting of the lacking skillset of pupils - e.g. they have no understanding of engineering units; limiting numeracy skills; poor understanding and manipulation of "formulae"; the thoughts that Pythagoras and Trigonometry which are used on a daily basis will never have an application in the real world...
    I suggest that the piece of paper defining what we "teach to" is less important than what the pupil has when he or she comes out of the school, with respect to practical Maths skills that would help them with their future training and life.
    The amibiguity of CfE assessment should allow teachers the freedom to really get to grips with what pupils will need, rather than focusing on what skills they should have to attain a certain mark in an exam. This requires close collaboration with other departments (e.g. Physics), and communication between schools and FE/Industry.
     
  3. A lot of what you say is (no offense intended) obvious and sensible. The problem is that what one child needs is not necessarily the same as another. Multiply that difference in needs by 30 and you have an idea of what our classrooms look like. Some pupils 'need' trigonometry, others (like myself) will NEVER use it in their adult life and would be better served by a really good arithmetic course.
    Unfortunately at school we don't have the luxury of teaching in job groupings ie all the future engineers in one room , future doctors in another, hairdressers in another. Often, we are trying to cater for all which is very difficult to achieve successfully.
     

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