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Preparing myself for a rollocking...

Discussion in 'Workplace dilemmas' started by Pippa68, May 22, 2012.

  1. So today i found out that some (6) of my year 2 top writing group havent performed well in their writing sats, long write (we've yet to do short write). I really honestly feel i've done my best with preparing them and teaching them but i've been told to prepare myself for a rollocking from the head. She has the attitude where everything is an excuse for why children don't achieve so i don't know what to say. I'm not the type of person to lay blame on anyone so i'm not looking to blame anything or the total lack of support from anyone.
    Really not wanting to go in to work tomorrow and i've been made to feel like a terrible teacher today. I'm now questioning whether i can actually do this anymore...
     
  2. chrisoakey

    chrisoakey Occasional commenter

    So, why doesn't the Head get the 6 pupils in and tell them off?
    Don't wimp out. Stand your ground. The pupil is responsible for the performance in a test not the teacher.
    You will, of course, have evidence that you have taught the group?
    Seems to me some primary teachers have given in to a bullying culture?
    I teach secondary and stand my ground if results are not great. I did x.y and z... The rest is up to the pupil.
     
  3. chriszwinter1

    chriszwinter1 New commenter

    Good advice. Sometime in the 1990s I asked my HT (at the time) to tell me that, if I was responsible for any aspect of a pupil's work, who would be responsible for any aspect of mine. He left the school 8 years ago and I'm still waiting for his answer.
     
  4. minnieminx

    minnieminx New commenter

    Because they are 6 or 7 years old?!

    In year 10 and 11 your advice is perfect, but in year 2 it would be totally unacceptable.
     
  5. And this is why when they come to us in secondary school the first thing we have to do is teach them to take responsibility for their learning. By which time it can sometimes be too late.

    I don't agree with giving them a telling off, but if it's six out of (I assume the usual) 30 or so then I'd say you've done your job and for some reason they were unable to do theirs. Did they revise? Did they do any practice outside of class? Even at that age I would expect pupils to do revision for a test.

    I agree with others - stand your ground. It's not the end of the year yet. I've just written some year 7 reports and have said in them that they haven't reached their target for the year but I expect them to do so in the next 8 weeks.
     
  6. ScienceGuy

    ScienceGuy Established commenter

    II would suggest looking at the data for all of your class; if there are pupils who have exceeded their levels then use them as a balance. How were the end of year levels decided? At the start of the year did you think they were realistic? To be honest, if only 6 of my students did not achieve their target level (which at my school are aspirational) I would be fairly happy as would my line manager and SMT
     
  7. causabon99

    causabon99 New commenter


    I'm a secondary school teacher. I find it very difficult to see the difference between a 2a and a 2b, and the shading between 2a and 3c can be infinitesmal. They should abolish these sub-levels ; they're meaningless. Come to think of it, so are levels, level-descriptors, and the whole panoply of this type of assessment. It's equivalent to the worst excesses of scholasticism. In the modern system, we're all apparently accountable for our results, but that's an entirely different concept from being responsible for them. Something is rotten in the state of Denmark.
     
  8. There is actually a big difference in writing at 2a and 3c, a 3c writer is far more sophisticated. When you are experienced at moderating at level 1,2 and 3 the differences are obvious. However, I have moderated 100's of pieces of writing that were claimed to be level 3 when they were clearly level 2. Having said that I completely agree with you the system is utter nonsense anyway.
     
  9. chrisoakey

    chrisoakey Occasional commenter

    This thread makes me despair.
    Children learn at different rates. They are not sausages which can be processed with measured inputs and predictable outputs.
    Blow the whistle on this idiocy. Stop believing the ridiculous notion that pupils can make predicted rates of progress in a given arbitrary period of time.
    It is anti-educational nonsense. Teachers who collude with this and feel guilty have got to stop before it is too late.
    Sorry for OP but you really have to stand your ground. Don't fall for trying to make excuses. It is what it is. Pupils need longer to jump through the hoop...and the world will continue.
     
  10. chriszwinter1

    chriszwinter1 New commenter

    Me too, Reinforcing what I said in post 11, I should tell you that I missed an appointment for an eye check-up not so long ago. When I apologised to my GP, who'd referred me to the specialist, the GP replied, "It's your eyesight. You're the one who's responsible for it." She was right, and remember, she works in the public sector.
    The OP is not responsible for anyone but herself.
     
  11. Me too.


     
  12. banjouk

    banjouk Occasional commenter

    If you work in a primary school, then this may be a good thing. These 6 pupils are 'effectively' under reported in KS1 and have the potential to 'add value' to the SATS results at KS2. Head's play this VA game, so I wouldn't worry to much.
     
  13. Hate to tell you guys, it gets worse.

    I'm now not allowed to plan or teach by myself next week. I'm 'team teaching' with my ks leader BOTH of my groups (lit and maths- where ONE child isnt where they should be, however this child missed 4 weeks worth of my maths teaching). I'm humiliated.
    I'm literally in pieces, havent eaten all day and cried for the last 2 hours. This is something that happens to teachers who are failing, i had 3 kids not meet their target. I really don't believe i can do this anymore.
     

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