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Pre-planning lessons for Ofsted observation

Discussion in 'Primary' started by impulce, Feb 12, 2012.

  1. How many people plan for potential Ofsted lesson observations in advance?
    There are some LOs that I would particularly like to cover when being observed and would ideally like to plan/resource in advance to save me time when the phonecall comes, but as we dont know when they're going to turn up my planned lessons may not fit in with the unit I have planned.
    Does this matter? Do they check that your lessons fit into your current units of work? I am just trying to find ways of being prepared!
     
  2. How many people plan for potential Ofsted lesson observations in advance?
    There are some LOs that I would particularly like to cover when being observed and would ideally like to plan/resource in advance to save me time when the phonecall comes, but as we dont know when they're going to turn up my planned lessons may not fit in with the unit I have planned.
    Does this matter? Do they check that your lessons fit into your current units of work? I am just trying to find ways of being prepared!
     
  3. minnieminx

    minnieminx New commenter

    Not in a million years. How on earth can you? Ofsted might come next week or in 3 months time, who can predict where their children will be and what they will need to cover? What if you 'save' something for ofsted and then they don't actually come? Our lesson plans have a space for prior assessment and changes due to the previous lesson, not sure how that would work with one off lessons. How would wall displays and the like link to the lesson being seen if they don't fit with the current unit of work?

    I cannot for the life of me see how this would work. I think the only way to be prepared is to ensure everything is in place in the classroom beforehand, so that all you do is plan as normal.

    Just make sure you use whiteboards in the maths starter (rather than have them use their brains and fingers!) or the lesson is deemed rubbish!
     
  4. ROSIEGIRL

    ROSIEGIRL Senior commenter

    Plus they talk to the kids too - imagine the answers!
    I'm with minnieminx on this - much better to make sure records and planning etc are up to date and then just get on with what you should be doing.
     
  5. I completely agree with the others here I'm afraid. Back in November 2010 our head teacher told us to plan for Ofsted as they were looming, which I didn't do (as I disagreed with her request, due to not knowing where the chidlren may be etc etc). A few of our teachers listened to her and planned their lessons, which were great - HOWEVER, we didn't receive the Ofsted phone call in 2010 - nor did we receive it in 2011, we had our Ofsted last week!! Happy to say that once we received the phone call I taught exactly what I would have done have Ofsted not been in to see us - ultimately it will be the chidlren that miss out I'm afraid!!
    You can't predict when they come in, nor can you plan a one off lesson that doesn't fit in with current teaching, however much you want to teach those objectives. Sorry!
     
  6. I do completely agree with you.
    We have been overdue since September and are expecting them very soon, so the lessons I wanted to plan were ones that fit in with the topic we are currently doing, but are fairly standalone in terms of Literacy/Numeracy. Obviously if they dont come in the next few weeks I would re-plan new lessons. I just want to do everything I can to be ahead of the game, and wondered if this was common practice as i've seen it suggested a few times.

    Thankyou for the responses!
     
  7. Pre-planning lessons for Ofsted?! Crazy idea.
    Good or outstanding Literacy and Numeracy lessons need to be driven by AfL - how on earth can you know you are teaching the correct skill way in advance?
     
  8. Just to add that our recent 'briefing' on the new Ofsted framework for inspections (i.e. post-January) was very clear that inspectors are far less interested in individual lessons (and staff) than they perhaps once were. They are working on the premise that if your teaching is outstanding (as a school, not as an individual), your children's rates of overall progress will be too. They want to see 'good teaching', of course, but they will be looking, in detail, at your paperwork, planning, records and evidence of AfL. They will be interested in the last three years (at least) and how your school evidences good teaching across that time frame.
    In short, it's not really about your one off jazzy lesson, and much more about whether you can evidence (as a body of staff) good teaching through proven results, or through firm evidence that standards are improving.
    Ultimately (although perhaps a bit crudely) it will not be possible for a school to get an Outstanding rating, unless it can show outstanding rates of progress for most of its children (i.e. more than 2 levels between key stages), or firmly evidence that they recognise why this isn't happening, and what they are doing to ensure it happens in the near future.
     

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