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Pracical Investigations - Primary Schools

Discussion in 'Science' started by Benchster, Jan 9, 2012.

  1. Benchster

    Benchster New commenter

    How much time do you spend per week/month/term on practical investigations? Is there any guidelines for practical science in the primary school? How do you record what's been done - especially in KS1? Thanks.
     
  2. Benchster

    Benchster New commenter

    How much time do you spend per week/month/term on practical investigations? Is there any guidelines for practical science in the primary school? How do you record what's been done - especially in KS1? Thanks.
     
  3. fulloffun

    fulloffun New commenter

    Science is taught weekly and KS1 would have a practical science lesson every week...we are trying to get KS2 to work similar and have an input from our local secondary school this half term to address the practical side of science in KS2.
    The school ( small 109 children ) has a 2 year rolling programme in KS2 for science and a 2 year rolling programme in KS1, in KS1 we cover the strands each year....KS2 is still governed a little by the old QCA topics which does give a structure to the plan, but we are going with the childrens ideas too.
    The teachers use the science app
     
  4. www.sigmascience.co.uk has been developed to put practical investigations and hands on science back into primary schools. There does not appear to be any strick guidelines relating to how much science should be placed on the weekly timetable (due to an overloaded curriculum!) but two lessons/hours a week should be the bare minimum! I have always had a practical afternoon of science where children plan investigations, carry them out, make predictions (and mistakes), evaluate and draw conclusions. I then try to include a follow up lesson where misconceptions and experiences can be shared and conclusions explained and challenged! Check out the sigma science website and download loads of our free resources to help pupils to think and learn like scientists.
     

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