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Post PGCE career options

Discussion in 'Trainee and student teachers' started by shineyboot, Mar 24, 2009.

  1. I have not particularly enjoyed the PGCE but have good days and bad days. If lessons go well and the children are well behaved I think I'd like to be a teacher but I also have difficult days when I wonder why I'm putting myself through this very stressful experience for what is a very hard and relatively low paid profession and having a huge amount of responsibility at a young age stresses me out.

    I'm over half way through the PGCE and would like to finish but now it's time to apply for jobs I'm still not sure. I know all schools are different and I know I have quite a challenging class so don't want to make decisions all based on placement.

    Can you delay the NQT year, if so for how long? Does anyone know if just having the PGCE can help get some jobs other than teaching, maybe in Education or in informal education?

    Does anyone know how many or rough percentage of people that fail the PGCE? My uni won't tell me.
     
  2. I have not particularly enjoyed the PGCE but have good days and bad days. If lessons go well and the children are well behaved I think I'd like to be a teacher but I also have difficult days when I wonder why I'm putting myself through this very stressful experience for what is a very hard and relatively low paid profession and having a huge amount of responsibility at a young age stresses me out.

    I'm over half way through the PGCE and would like to finish but now it's time to apply for jobs I'm still not sure. I know all schools are different and I know I have quite a challenging class so don't want to make decisions all based on placement.

    Can you delay the NQT year, if so for how long? Does anyone know if just having the PGCE can help get some jobs other than teaching, maybe in Education or in informal education?

    Does anyone know how many or rough percentage of people that fail the PGCE? My uni won't tell me.
     
  3. Indefinitely, if you don't do any short-term supply (less than a term in the same school). If you do supply, there is a limit of four terms before you have to start induction (after up to a year's extension).
    PGCE (and QTS), being a professional qualification, doesn't automatically lead to another type of employment. There are other jobs in education or education-related fields suitable for teachers, but normally they are looking for those with some years of teaching experience, rather than just having teaching qualification. Such jobs, like being an education officer in a museum, are highly sought after and you'll be competing with experienced teachers. You can become tutors, but you don't need PGCE or QTS for that. You can certainly highlight transferable skills you've learnt on PGCE when going for non-teaching jobs, but that's no different from people with other types of qualification. Same principles apply for other education-related jobs, such as in publishing (TES?), support services, ICT or teaching unions.
    It's difficult to find out how many actually fail PGCE, having completed the course. If you say what percentage of those who have started PGCE fail to get the qualification, including those who drop out, told to leave or actually fail, you are talking about 5 to 40%, but it varies widely between courses and providers. But generally, those unis and courses that demand the highest qualification and suitability (i.e. highly competitive entry) have lower failure/non-completion rate than those that are less competitive. If you trawl [http://www.tda.gov.uk/partners/datasurveys.aspx], you may get some figures divided by regions, types of courses and subjects, but not individual courses. More statistics are available on annual Good Teacher Training Guide on [http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/education/research/ceer/pdfs/gtt-report.pdf]

     
  4. WillowFae

    WillowFae New commenter

    If you decide to take a year off between PGCE and NQT how will that affect your chances of finding a job the following year? It is an option I'm considering for family reasons.
     
  5. Depends on the usual factors of subject, phase and area. If you don't do any teaching for the whole year, you will be at a disadvantage compared to those straight out of training and other teachers with regular experience. But if you have skills and experience that set you apart, I'd have thought you will still be a strong candidate. Best way is to keep your teaching skills honed and keep your foot in the door by doing some supply or working voluntarily in school.
     
  6. welshwizard

    welshwizard Established commenter Forum guide

    further to Alec's advice it depends on 2 factors - where you are looking in the country and the time you look. Opportunities vary region to region and the majority of NQT vacancies tend to be filled in Spring-Summer term
    Check TheoGriff's threads for further information and the TES NQT supplement which has John Howson's data about NQT take up nationally
     
  7. I sympathise shineyboot - I hated my last placement on my pgce, to the point where I became withdrawn, very unhappy and cried most days I was in that school! However I stuck it out and got a job that I love in a good school - it scares me now to think I could've missed out on that because of a negative experience on pgce. I think the pgce is massively underestimated in terms of just how stressful and difficult it is - I started to lose any sense of perspective. this time of year in any school is tough. Would it be worth sticking it out, doing your NQT year and then see how you feel?
     

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