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Possible SEN child??

Discussion in 'Early Years' started by ExploringDora, Nov 26, 2011.

  1. Hi all, just looking for any advice about a pupil in my nursery class, i have my own ideas about him but wondering what anybody else can suggest. The boy will be 4 in January but very often poos or wees himself and doesnt seem to have any idea that hes done it. His mum says he is too shy to ask to go the toilet. His physical development is very delayed, his wrists are extremely stiff. has poor fine motor control. Cannot hold a pencil properly. he goes into his own world during group stories and music time, starts using his hands to play lions and cars etc, but is completely cut off from what is going on around him. Has lack of communication with adults and peers, makes lots of funny noises, tongue is always out of his mouth and he dribbles alot. Went on a trip the other day, and he was completely lost, the activity was very interactive, the children were free to press buttons, play on their own, all the other children were very involved, he stood there, head down looking at the floor, playing with his hands,. I tried to encourage him to participate but he resisted, shaking his head and still playing with his fingers. he will not make eye contact.
    I know its difficult to make judgements without actually seeing the child, but would be grateful for anybodys opinions. As i said at the start, i have my own ideas about what could be up with him but maybe i am off the wrong track, maybe it could be something else. Have spoken to his mum about his toileting and his hand movements and she says he is shy so wont ask to go to the toilet, and he uses his hands in that way when he is dancing.. For a 4 year old he is completely lost within the class, and will only get further away from the rest of the group.
    Any ideas, and the best way forward now?? Am not in England so dont have a SENCO but i do want the mum to start to realise that this is not shyness. There is no way i can see him coping in recepption, and am worried about the prospects of him if the munm doesnt accept it soon.
     
  2. Leapyearbaby64

    Leapyearbaby64 New commenter

    It's very difficult if Mum does not accept there is an issue. In England, I'd be contacting the child's Health Visitor - I don't know if you have someone similar where you are?
     
  3. No we dont have anyone like that, they would have to go privately and it would be on my head if i suggested something, then they came back and said theres nothing wrong. At the moment she thinks hes ok, but all the time i need to be saying something about him that seems negative. Dont really know the best way to approach this.
     
  4. Could you look at something with Mum to 'measure' his development together. That may help to identify to her tat there are greater difficulties?
     
  5. Leapyearbaby64

    Leapyearbaby64 New commenter

    Maybe use the development matters assessments? They are quite useful because they give age bands so she can actually see where he is and is not working at an age appropriate level.
     
  6. What you must have at your fingertips is a place where the parents can go to get the child assessed by a person with additional professional knowledge. If you don't have that available then you could be wasting your time. I say this because i worked in Africa for 3 years, though was educated in UK. If there's no opportunity to seek other professional advice in your area then you will be facing un uphill struggle convincing the parents there is something amiss..
     
  7. upsadaisy

    upsadaisy New commenter

    How will having a label help this child?

    If you know that child is not meeting age related expectations, then explain that to the parents, tell them what they can do at home to help.

    Bring the child or request it of him that he goes to the toilet every hour.
    Make him a fine motor and gross motor programme.
     

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