1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

Porridge v. doughnuts

Discussion in 'Cookery' started by cosmos, Feb 8, 2011.

  1. A small donut contains about 6g sugar, 6g fat, and 15g carbohydrates. A bowl of porridge is usually eaten with about 18g of sugar, and half a cup of milk which will give you 6g of fat, and contains 52g carbohydrates. Most people will eat two donuts, so you eat less sugar but more fat if you go for donuts over porridge.
    Can this be true? I am astonished if it is. Does anyone know?
     
  2. A small donut contains about 6g sugar, 6g fat, and 15g carbohydrates. A bowl of porridge is usually eaten with about 18g of sugar, and half a cup of milk which will give you 6g of fat, and contains 52g carbohydrates. Most people will eat two donuts, so you eat less sugar but more fat if you go for donuts over porridge.
    Can this be true? I am astonished if it is. Does anyone know?
     
  3. BelleDuJour

    BelleDuJour Star commenter

    I make my porridge with half water and half semi-skimmed milk...........way less than 6g fat.
    I don't use any sugar either, just about half a teaspoon of soft brown sugar on top. Again, way less than the 18g quoted.
    Can't see the point of this, and if I do eat donuts it's just the one.
     
  4. modelmaker

    modelmaker Occasional commenter

  5. lapinrose

    lapinrose Lead commenter

    Porridge is high in fibre and believed to help lower cholesterol levels. In addition the milk provides calcium, some protein and vitamins. The doughnut has sugar and fat as opposed to the naturally occurring sugars and fats in the porridge. Substitute sugar with fruit and you have a good breakfast, especially if using dried apricots for the iron.
     
  6. I occassionally enjoy porridge - as an alternative to my usual branflakes.
    I use semiskimmed milk and no sugar - but add a small portion of tea-soaked dried fruits for sweetness.
    Much healthier than a donut!
     
  7. rosievoice

    rosievoice Star commenter

    Sweet stuff on porridge? Yuk. I make porridge with water, pour on semi skimmed and a sprinkle of salt. (Old family method.)
     
  8. nick909

    nick909 Lead commenter

    Pretty much nonsense, or a severe bending of the truth. Define a 'small' donut, for starters? Those tiny ring ones that people in work always seem to buy a box of and leave in the staffroom on their birthdays?
    Look at the weights of this thoeretical donut - 6g + 6g + 15g + maybe another 20g or so of water content = a 46g donut. Does that sound like any donuts you know of? You'd want at least 2 to even touch the sides!
    Carbohydrates aren't evil, but refined ones are. Porridge, especially whole rolled oats are slow-release, so a smallish portion will still leave you feeling satsified for longer. Donuts, lovely as they are as on occasional treat, are almost entirely refined carbohydrates or pure sugar and as well as sending insulin levels rocketing, resulting in an inevitable sugar crash, will leave you feeling hungry again shortly afterwards. Another donut anyone?
    18g of sugar in an average bowl? Really? I doubt it.
    Fat content, I'm not bothered about - I don't believe there's a link between dietary fat and bad health.
    Utter piffle.
    Donuts aren't unhealthy per se, but they're definitely not good breakfast fodder.
     
  9. nick909

    nick909 Lead commenter

    Oh, I make mine with water, add a pinch of salt and a little butter and then add either dried fruit or honey. I add a drop of cold milk on top if it's too hot and I'm in a rush!
     
  10. That is how I make mine!
    Has to be salt, no sugar, and just a sprinkle.
    Also it is worth remembering that porridge will keep you full for longer as you will burn the energy off more slowly than from the doughnuts, which are made with refined flour and sugars.


     
  11. I have 2 basic porridges, the water/milk and salt one that seems to be popular and then a sweeter variety if I am feeling a bit down, it'sall milk and has either a sprinkle of cinnamon or half an apple chopped in.
    Sugar in it just sounds wrong and 16g is waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay high - that's 4 teaspoons of sugar - eeeeeeeeeeeeuuuuuuuuuurgh and surely it would be crunchy, you can't dissolve that much sugar in porridge, can you??!!
     
  12. ah, yes - Pobs - cinnamon is my "sweet treat" for those yucky days.
    And I also find 16g (as you say, that is 4 tsp - a tsp is about 5g on average, so actually we are getting nearer to 20g with sugar, or it is 3 tsp (15g) ) totally daft - who puts that much sugar on porridge?
    If you add fruit, of course fruit contains natural sugars. NATURAL sugars - not refined, yucky white sugar!
    Nothing wrong with natural sugar, nothing wrong with natural carbs, nothing wrong with natural fats.
    REFINED c.arp is the bad stuff!
    And a doughnut is full of refined stuff (I do enjoy one now and then - I do that "who can resist the longest at lipping their lips" thing with my kids - you have to have a bit of fun in life).
     
  13. Thank you all. I asked this as it follows on from a thread over on opinion in which a poster maintained that a doughnut was no less healthy than porridge. I couldn't believe that this was right and I'm glad to have it confirmed.
     
  14. Aaaaaaaaaaaah! Deep joy. That is what the sugared doughnut was invented for!
     
  15. Ecky thump, I missed that on Opinion! I would have been right in there otherwise, being my usual dragon self!
     
  16. cosmos, you can, of course, now link to this thread and say ner ner ner ner ner.
    Cos whoever it was, was wrong!

     
  17. I like my porridge made with salt - but MrA's non-salt (for high blood pressure) cooking doesn't allow that.
    But we do like a drizzle of golden syrup over it. Yum.
    Just checked the pantry. A squeezy bottle lasts us over a month during winter when we have porridge every day, and that's 500gm . So that would be 250gm each, about 8gm per day each if we used it all in a month, which we don't.
     
  18. ah, thanks, lapin.
    Cosmos - I am not sure if the article I read is the same one as you, but I was reading one the other day on some news site where some - well, scientists, I suppose they were - have now claimed that eating junk food and processed products makes your brain SHRINK!
    So that may be the link with IQ (as was mentioned in the thread - don't want to have an argy bargy on Opinion tonight!)
    I am no scientist, but we know nowadays that you need healthy food in order for your vital organs to work efficiently - and the brain IS a vital organ (in fact, the most important one).
     
  19. I hadn't heard about the brain shrinking! That would certainly explain a low IQ.
    Any mention of what wine does? Oh what the heck - pours another glass....

     

Share This Page