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Pork Chops

Discussion in 'Cookery' started by ROSIEGIRL, Jan 1, 2012.

  1. ROSIEGIRL

    ROSIEGIRL Senior commenter

    Haven't cooked pork chops for years - I need a good tasty recipe for tonight! Grill, pan fry or casserole?
    I've got a pretty well stocked storecupboard but as the shops are shut there's no chance to get anything too obscure.
    I always feel a bit disappointed with pork chops so I need inspiring - as do the family.
    Thanks!
     
  2. Crowbob

    Crowbob Senior commenter

    Throw the disgusting things away and find something else to eat (takeaway?) Pork chops are utterly repulsive and eating your children is preferable to going anywhere near the vileness of chops.
     
  3. ROSIEGIRL

    ROSIEGIRL Senior commenter

    Well in a way that's a bit how I feel! But the supermarket shelves were very Mother-Hubbarded when I got round to doing the shopping yesterday so I thought I'd try and overcome my pork-chop-reluctance.
    They're just sitting there looking at me, every time I open the fridge door.
     
  4. lapinrose

    lapinrose Lead commenter

    Trim the fat off and remove the bone, beat them thin then egg and breadcrumb and serve as escalopes,You could add sage and onion to the breadcrumbs and serve with apple sauce or quartered eating apples fried in butter. Add mash and a green vegetable, and nice meal.
     
  5. Crowbob

    Crowbob Senior commenter

    I agree, aside from the presence of pork chop. You can try hiding it in breadcrumbs but it won't change things...
     
  6. I would take the bone and fat off, slice very thinly and stir fry, or I would take the meat off and stick in the slow cooker with a sauce.
     
  7. ROSIEGIRL

    ROSIEGIRL Senior commenter

    I've got some cider. And apples? We like quite big flavours though. I've seen a recipe for pork with balsamic vinegar - that should cover up the taste of the pork nicely!
     
  8. lapinrose

    lapinrose Lead commenter

    Pancakes? The chinese sort? Or make some small pancakes, then slice the rest, marinade in soy sauce, cider, garlic, chinese spices of some sort, stir fry the pork, serve with fingers of apple, onion and a plum sauce. You can make your own from plum or damson jam, even apricot, add soy sauce and some spices, eg 5 spice, crushed star anise until you get a flavour you like.
     
  9. BelleDuJour

    BelleDuJour Star commenter

    Fry them until cooked. Then fry a few apple slices, put these on top of the chops. Top with grated cheese and grill. Make a little sauce by deglazing the pan with cider. Done!
     
  10. Bethannie

    Bethannie New commenter

    Cut off the meat, slice into chunks.
    Slow cook with cider, sliced apples and sliced pears.
    Just before it's ready to serve add some dumplings to cook - big fluffy ones with sage added.
    Serve with jacket potatoes.
     
  11. ROSIEGIRL

    ROSIEGIRL Senior commenter

    Spoilt for choice now. Will have to decide soon - thank you!
     
  12. nick909

    nick909 Star commenter

    Pork chops are delicious. Anyone who doesn't believe so hasn't had them cooked properly or hasn't eaten good quality pork chops from a rare breed pig with layers of fat running through (forget supermarket chops - generally very sad things) or is a veggie/lunatic.
    Cook them gently. Fry them by using tongs to hold them sideways so the fat crisps first, then gently does it on each side. Pork can be eaten a little on the pink side these days (not rare, mind) and this is infinitely preferable to dried out and tasteless.
    Dip two sage leaves in oil and then flour and stick to each side of a chop before cooking - lovely.
    Make a pocket inside the chop by cutting horizontally into it and stuffing it with a flavoured butter - a good one is butter, garlic, dried apricot, parma ham and a little fresh sage or rosemary. Either bake or fry.
    Bake in the oven with par-boiled potatoes, garlic, rosemary and chopped apples or pears.
    Poor pork chops.

     
  13. nick, I bloody love your posts!
     
  14. ROSIEGIRL

    ROSIEGIRL Senior commenter

    Sounds delicious nick.
    So in the end I cooked them in mustard and cider and onions and garlic. Served with apple sauce and roasties and veg. They were better than I anticipated and were well received by the family - more positive than I expected.
    Thanks for all the ideas - I'll keep them for future reference!
    Happy New Year!
     
  15. inky

    inky Lead commenter

    What's wrong with chops? I always thought they were amonsgt the least controversial meat cuts. One of you suggests boning them. Why? Half the fun of a chop is picking it up and searching for the last few bits of flesh.
    Long live chops and glad to hear that you enjoyed yours, Rosie. As fo rare breeds, they cost a bit and I'm usually happy with plain outdoor reared.

    I also often go down the cream and cider route with pork. It's a tasty and useful standby and doesn't take much effort.
     
  16. inky

    inky Lead commenter

    True, but loin steaks will do welll for that, without the waste. I've been trying to decide on schnitzels recently and have discovered that I like pork loin ones as much as veal.. Mr inky's mother would turn in her grave to hear me say that but I know for a fact that she has eaten and enjoyed the pork variety many times, even though she'd blanch at the thought of cooking them!

     
  17. lapinrose

    lapinrose Lead commenter

    I was just trying to find a way of cooking pork chops that someone who claimed not to like them would enjoy. I use pork for schnitzels or escalopes as I can't find any veal easily.
     
  18. nick909

    nick909 Star commenter

    As do I love yours, Manny.
    Re the expense of rare breed - not necessarily. Relatively 'common' rare breeds (if you'll excuse the oxymoron) might be Hampshire pigs, which are available in Waitrose at least (try to get their rack chops from the butcher counter - wonderful) and not that expensive, at around £2 a chop. You can get rarer breeds such as the Old Spot and Middle White from good butchers and farm shops for not much more than a couple of quid a chop. Not cheap by any means, but hardly breaking the bank. Lovely, dark, textured meat, with a strong flavour and plenty of flavoursome fat to baste the meat.
    Anything but the lowly but ubiquitous Large White, bred for its size, quick growth and lack of fat, the latter wrongly perceived by many to be a priority in terms of porky requirements. Fat is even more essential in pork than other meats, prone as it is to drying out, and with the fat growing in seams rather than marbling through the meat, and a pig with no fat is a pig with no flavour at all.
    I do agree with Inky though. Outdoor-reared is essential, and these are easily obtainable in most supermarkets. Better tasting pork of course, but more importantly, a better quality of life for the poor piggies, whose intelligence and emotional capacities have been likened to that of dogs. Intensively farmed pigs, with the possible exception of battery chickens, are typically the most appallingly reared of all domestic wildstock. I'll take a pricier, well-reared pork chop over a cheap, intensively-reared option anyday, even if it means eating them far less frequently.
     
  19. inky

    inky Lead commenter

    That's the thing - eating them far less frequently. We've had an absolute fleshfest this Christmas but we'll be soaking them thar beans in penance this new year!
     
  20. Crowbob

    Crowbob Senior commenter

    You are wrong. They are viiiilllleeeeeee.......
    What's right with them!?
    Bleh [​IMG]
     

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