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Poetry year 8 question - please help

Discussion in 'English' started by iheartpoetry, Dec 6, 2011.

  1. Hello all,

    I am a PGCE student teaching the John Agard poem, 'Listen Mr. Oxford Don' to a year 8 class. I am planning the final lesson of a three part sequence focusing on the effect on the reader of the performance compared with the use of violent language. Although it is a top set the abilities are immensely diverse and whereas some students have finished all the set tasks, others have barely started. What advice would you give in terms of planning that includes everyone? I need to challenge those of a high ability whilst ensuring that the others are not left behind. The class are somewhat rowdy and if I have them all working on totally different tasks I am worried that I will not be able to keep everyone engaged and learning. Another concern is that most of the students have not grasped (my fault) the overall concept which is that John Agard is not a violent man, he just wants to speak his own kind of English. Would you start afresh and have everyone go back over everything to get everyone on the same level or push on and give the more able students an extension activity to work on?

    Many many thanks!
     
  2. Hello all,

    I am a PGCE student teaching the John Agard poem, 'Listen Mr. Oxford Don' to a year 8 class. I am planning the final lesson of a three part sequence focusing on the effect on the reader of the performance compared with the use of violent language. Although it is a top set the abilities are immensely diverse and whereas some students have finished all the set tasks, others have barely started. What advice would you give in terms of planning that includes everyone? I need to challenge those of a high ability whilst ensuring that the others are not left behind. The class are somewhat rowdy and if I have them all working on totally different tasks I am worried that I will not be able to keep everyone engaged and learning. Another concern is that most of the students have not grasped (my fault) the overall concept which is that John Agard is not a violent man, he just wants to speak his own kind of English. Would you start afresh and have everyone go back over everything to get everyone on the same level or push on and give the more able students an extension activity to work on?

    Many many thanks!
     
  3. roamingteacher

    roamingteacher Occasional commenter Forum guide

    Why not put them into mixed ability groups and let them support each other? The challenge for the higher ability will no doubt be ensuring that all the group is together in their understanding. What's the learning intention as everything should follow from that? I don't understand 'the effect on the reader of the performance compared with the use of violent language.' Can you make this clearer?

    By the way, there's a fair bit of vocabulary in there that might need to be dealt with before exploring the poem...
     
  4. Spassky

    Spassky New commenter

    Make the work for each pupil appropriate to their target level - differentiate the objectives. The tasks can then possibly be fairly similar.
     
  5. Spassky

    Spassky New commenter

    I do this poem starting off by playing excerpts and displaying the relevant sections of the lyrics to the Bob Marley songs alluded to in the poem - 'Hammer' and 'Small Axe'. Then we talk about Caribbean history, oppression, the metaphors in the song, cultural pride etc. They get all this as either they know about Bob Marley's ideas or find them nice and accessible. Which leads them into the poem.
     
  6. Spassky

    Spassky New commenter

    They also discuss statements relating to ideas and attitudes relevant to the poem before they read it."Literature should be written in Standard English" "Strong accents are for thick people" "The beliefs of well educated people are more valid than other people's" etc
     

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